Speccy Spectrum Analyzer

4.5
957 reviews
100K+
Downloads
Content rating
Everyone
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About this app

Turn your phone into a Spectrum Analyzer. Speccy is an Audio Spectrum Analysis tool, which visualizes the spread of frequencies detected by your microphone. It uses an FFT signal processing algorithm and supports the most languages of any similar app. It's also the only app of its kind allowing you to export audio snapshot data to the clipboard, for plotting in Excel, etc.

It has a wide range of uses, such as: assessing environmental noise, tuning speaker systems, identifying audio signals obscured to the human ear by noise or simply testing the microphone on your device. You could use Speccy to compare the quality of different types of headphones, test signal generators or measure audio signals just outside human perception. It apparently has also been used successfully to find gas leaks.

Speccy provides the most 'analysis window functions' (the 13 most popular for audio engineers) and, for your added peace of mind, the only permission Speccy needs is microphone access.
Updated on
Jun 21, 2020

Data safety

Safety starts with understanding how developers collect and share your data. Data privacy and security practices may vary based on your use, region, and age. The developer provided this information and may update it over time.
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No data collected
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4.5
957 reviews
Nicholas Bodley
November 27, 2020
Beautiful piece of work, very configurable. It's a real–time audio spectrum analyzer, I'd say professional grade, although reading exact peak frequencies could be easier, perhaps. Non–technical people might want to learn more; such magic happens when deep understanding gives us such as this. Nevertheless, the essentials should be self–evident.
8 people found this review helpful
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spikything.com
December 31, 2020
Thank you. I'll have a think about the easiest way to enable an exact frequency entry field for the 'inspector line'. Though bear in mind that a Fourier Transform is a mathematical model of the weight within a given frequency band. Setting the highest 'FFT length' of 16384 gives a resolution of around 3Hz. Higher than this might be impractical.
A Google user
September 21, 2019
Couple of small issues but surprisingly accurate. At high resolution, the Max power cursor doesn't seem to track the peak, close but not quite. Using the menu icons also moves the cursor, and it's difficult to set the cursor at a specific frequency. No instructions.
2 people found this review helpful
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spikything.com
September 22, 2019
Thanks for the feedback - really good points, I'll look into this.
A Google user
December 18, 2018
I have no idea what I am doing. Yet. But it's really interesting. Got a link where I can learn the basics? Quality app. Very responsive and more info than I know what to do with atm. Nice layout also👍 EDIT: I am messing with it right now to try and emulate a sonar app I had for an OLD iPhone. I used to use it to find the stairs in the dark...figured maybe if I figured out how to get an alternative app that I can tweak a bit, just maybe, I could get at least a crappy image of my room in the dark. just an idea. would just need to be enough to tell how far away furniture and doors are. Been bugging me I can't find a replacement app....it almost seems like they are prohibited.
4 people found this review helpful
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spikything.com
December 18, 2018
Thanks for the update. As I mentioned, there are so many uses that I'm still learning about new uses myself :) I like the idea of a sonar app, but wonder about its practicality vs low level lighting (I might try it). For now, here are the links I found: https://is.gd/blBZ3k https://is.gd/piwiju https://is.gd/YolpGV https://is.gd/f3WO3h

What's new

• 64-bit support added