Three Short Stories and Ten Poems

The Bookquarium

Narrated by Frank Marcopolos

59 min

Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961) was one of the most influential writers of all time. The American author, a newspaper journalist in his twenties, crafted a unique, terse style later emulated by many writers. He called this the "Iceberg Theory" because much of any given story exists below the surface. Hemingway's adventurous lifestyle and larger-than-life persona brought admiration from future generations.


Frank Marcopolos (1972-) founded "The Whirligig" literary magazine in 1999, which has been called "a landmark, demonstrating the power of the literary underground." One reviewer said that "you get this true lion-roaring sense that Editor Frank Marcopolos knows what he likes, and how to read, and how to publish, and he has guts, and eats insects on Wheaties with bleach." Frank's long-form fiction has been reviewed with such praise as "thorough-goingly entertaining" and "highly readable...recalls the style of Michael Chabon or John Irving. A literary gem that should not be missed." A broadcasting-school graduate, Frank's unique literary-audio work has been featured in movie trailers, scholastic environments, underground mixtapes, and on YouTube, with one of his audiobooks achieving over 100,000 "views" there. He lives in Pittsburgh, and records at The Bookquarium Recording Studio. Praise from listeners:

"The vocals on this are fabulous. I loved listening and you will too! Great voice on this guy." - Scribd review

"Thee perfect voice for audiobooks! It is so listenable!" -YouTube comment


Three Stories: /


  1. Up In Michigan /
  2. Out Of Season /
  3. My Old Man /

Ten Poems: /


  1. Mitraigliatrice /
  2. Oklahoma /
  3. Oily Weather /
  4. Roosevelt /
  5. Captives /
  6. Champs D'Honneur /
  7. Riparto D'Assalto /
  8. Montparnasse /
  9. Along With Youth /
  10. Chapter Heading
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Additional Information

Publisher
The Bookquarium
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Published on
Jan 26, 2019
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Duration
59m 45s
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ISBN
9781733664608
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / Literary
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Export option
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Eligible for Family Library

Listening information

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The fourth in the series of new annotated editions of Ernest Hemingway’s work, edited by the author’s grandson Seán and introduced by his son Patrick, this “illuminating” (The Washington Post) collection includes the best of the well-known classics as well as unpublished stories, early drafts, and notes that “offer insight into the mind and methods of one of the greatest practitioners of the story form” (Kirkus Reviews).

Ernest Hemingway is a cultural icon—an archetype of rugged masculinity, a romantic ideal of the intellectual in perpetual exile—but, to his countless readers, Hemingway remains a literary force much greater than his image. Of all of Hemingway’s canonical fictions, perhaps none demonstrate so forcefully the power of the author’s revolutionary style as his short stories. In classics like “Hills like White Elephants,” “The Butterfly in the Tank,” and “The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber,” Hemingway shows us great literature compressed to its most potent essentials. We also see, in Hemingway’s short fiction, the tales that created the legend: these are stories of men and women in love and in war and on the hunt, stories of a lost generation born into a fractured time.

The Short Stories of Ernest Hemingway presents many of Hemingway’s most famous classics alongside rare and unpublished material: Hemingway’s early drafts and correspondence, his dazzling out-of-print essay on the art of the short story, and two marvelous examples of his earliest work--his first published story, “The Judgment of Manitou,” which Hemingway wrote when still a high school student, and a never-before-published story, written when the author was recovering from a war injury in Milan after WWI. This work offers vital insight into the artistic development of one of the twentieth century’s greatest writers. It is a perfect introduction for a new generation of Hemingway readers, and it belongs in the collection of any true Hemingway fan.
A LATER CLASSIC FROM AMERICA'S PREMIER FICTION WRITER

First published in 1970, nine years after Hemingway's death, this is the story of an artist and adventurer -- a man much like Hemingway himself. Beginning in the 1930s, Islands in the Stream follows the fortunes of Thomas Hudson, from his experiences as a painter on the Gulf Stream island of Bimini through his antisubmarine activities off the coast of Cuba during World War II. Hemingway is at his mature best in this beguiling tale.

Ernest Hemingway did more to change the style of English prose than any other writer in the twentieth century, and for his efforts he was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature in 1954. Hemingway wrote in short, declarative sentences and was known for his tough, terse prose. Publication of The Sun Also Rises and A Farewell to Arms immediately established Ernest Hemingway as one of the greatest literary lights of the twentieth century. As part of the expatriate community in 1920s Paris, the former journalist and World War I ambulance driver began a career that lead to international fame. Hemingway was an aficionado of bullfighting and big-game hunting, and his main protagonists were always men and women of courage and conviction, who suffered unseen scars, both physical and emotional. He covered the Spanish Civil War, portraying it in fiction in his brilliant novel For Whom the Bell Tolls, and he subsequently covered World War II. His classic novella The Old Man and the Sea won the Pulitzer Prize in 1953. He died in 1961.
The fourth in the series of new annotated editions of Ernest Hemingway’s work, edited by the author’s grandson Seán and introduced by his son Patrick, this “illuminating” (The Washington Post) collection includes the best of the well-known classics as well as unpublished stories, early drafts, and notes that “offer insight into the mind and methods of one of the greatest practitioners of the story form” (Kirkus Reviews).

Ernest Hemingway is a cultural icon—an archetype of rugged masculinity, a romantic ideal of the intellectual in perpetual exile—but, to his countless readers, Hemingway remains a literary force much greater than his image. Of all of Hemingway’s canonical fictions, perhaps none demonstrate so forcefully the power of the author’s revolutionary style as his short stories. In classics like “Hills like White Elephants,” “The Butterfly in the Tank,” and “The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber,” Hemingway shows us great literature compressed to its most potent essentials. We also see, in Hemingway’s short fiction, the tales that created the legend: these are stories of men and women in love and in war and on the hunt, stories of a lost generation born into a fractured time.

The Short Stories of Ernest Hemingway presents many of Hemingway’s most famous classics alongside rare and unpublished material: Hemingway’s early drafts and correspondence, his dazzling out-of-print essay on the art of the short story, and two marvelous examples of his earliest work--his first published story, “The Judgment of Manitou,” which Hemingway wrote when still a high school student, and a never-before-published story, written when the author was recovering from a war injury in Milan after WWI. This work offers vital insight into the artistic development of one of the twentieth century’s greatest writers. It is a perfect introduction for a new generation of Hemingway readers, and it belongs in the collection of any true Hemingway fan.
The fourth in the series of new annotated editions of Ernest Hemingway’s work, edited by the author’s grandson Seán and introduced by his son Patrick, this “illuminating” (The Washington Post) collection includes the best of the well-known classics as well as unpublished stories, early drafts, and notes that “offer insight into the mind and methods of one of the greatest practitioners of the story form” (Kirkus Reviews).

Ernest Hemingway is a cultural icon—an archetype of rugged masculinity, a romantic ideal of the intellectual in perpetual exile—but, to his countless readers, Hemingway remains a literary force much greater than his image. Of all of Hemingway’s canonical fictions, perhaps none demonstrate so forcefully the power of the author’s revolutionary style as his short stories. In classics like “Hills like White Elephants,” “The Butterfly in the Tank,” and “The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber,” Hemingway shows us great literature compressed to its most potent essentials. We also see, in Hemingway’s short fiction, the tales that created the legend: these are stories of men and women in love and in war and on the hunt, stories of a lost generation born into a fractured time.

The Short Stories of Ernest Hemingway presents many of Hemingway’s most famous classics alongside rare and unpublished material: Hemingway’s early drafts and correspondence, his dazzling out-of-print essay on the art of the short story, and two marvelous examples of his earliest work--his first published story, “The Judgment of Manitou,” which Hemingway wrote when still a high school student, and a never-before-published story, written when the author was recovering from a war injury in Milan after WWI. This work offers vital insight into the artistic development of one of the twentieth century’s greatest writers. It is a perfect introduction for a new generation of Hemingway readers, and it belongs in the collection of any true Hemingway fan.
Various Authors

"When you read (or listen to) a short story, you come out a little more aware and a little more in love with the world around you." ~ George Saunders


Here you will find 50 of the greatest public-domain short stories ever written, as curated by the staff of The Bookquarium, all performed by Frank Marcopolos. ("Thee perfect voice for audiobooks--it is so listenable!" said one reviewer.)


Some of the greatest writers in history are included in this collection--Ernest Hemingway, Ayn Rand, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Jack London, William Faulkner, Kate Chopin, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Kurt Vonnegut, Jr., Stephen Crane, H.P. Lovecraft, Willa Cather, and Edgar Allan Poe among them.


Frank Marcopolos Bio:


Frank Marcopolos founded "The Whirligig" literary magazine in 1999, which has been called "a landmark, demonstrating the power of the literary underground." One reviewer said that "you get this true lion-roaring sense that Editor Frank Marcopolos knows what he likes, and how to read, and how to publish, and he has guts, and eats insects on Wheaties with bleach." Frank's long-form fiction has been reviewed with such praise as "thorough-goingly entertaining" and "highly readable...recalls the style of Michael Chabon or John Irving. A literary gem that should not be missed." A broadcasting-school graduate, Frank's unique literary-audio work has been featured in movie trailers, scholastic environments, underground mixtapes, and on YouTube, with one of his audiobooks achieving over 100,000 "views" there. He lives in Pittsburgh, PA, without a dog, and records at The Bookquarium Recording Studio.


The stories included are as follows:


My Old Man by Ernest HemingwayAnthem by Ayn Rand The Most Dangerous Game by Richard ConnellThe Curious Case of Benjamin Button by F. Scott FitzgeraldAn Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge by Ambrose BierceThe Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins GilmanTo Build a Fire by Jack LondonBartleby, the Scrivener by Herman MelvilleLanding in Luck by William FaulknerThe Fly by Katherine MansfieldThe Kiss by Kate ChopinThe Minister's Black Veil by Nathaniel HawthorneThe Tell-Tale Heart by Edgar Allan PoeThe Lady, or the Tiger? by Frank R. StocktonThe Open Boat by Stephen CraneYoung Goodman Brown by Nathaniel HawthorneThe Gift of the Magi by O. HenryThe Dead by James JoyceThe Gun by Philip K. DickThe Big Trip Up Yonder by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington IrvingThe Purloined Letter by Edgar Allan PoeThe Door in the Wall by H.G. WellsOn the Gull's Road by Willa CatherThe Story of an Hour by Kate ChopinThe Last Leaf by O. Henry2BR02B by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.The Picture in the House by H.P. LovecraftThe Monkey's Paw by W.W. JacobsA Dark Brown Dog by Stephen CraneAraby by James JoyceThe Cask of Amontillado by Edgar Allan PoeThe Luck of Roaring Camp by Bret HarteThe Interlopers by Saki (H.H. Munro)Up in Michigan by Ernest HemingwayWilliam Wilson by Edgar Allan PoeThe Street

Jack London (1876-1916) was an influential American writer, who often chronicled adventures taking place in extremely cold environments. His works were popular in his lifetime, earning him a large fortune.


Frank Marcopolos (1972-) founded "The Whirligig" literary magazine in 1999, which has been called "a landmark, demonstrating the power of the literary underground." One reviewer said that "you get this true lion-roaring sense that Editor Frank Marcopolos knows what he likes, and how to read, and how to publish, and he has guts, and eats insects on Wheaties with bleach." Frank's long-form fiction has been reviewed with such praise as "thorough-goingly entertaining" and "highly readable...recalls the style of Michael Chabon or John Irving. A literary gem that should not be missed." A broadcasting-school graduate, Frank's unique literary-audio work has been featured in movie trailers, scholastic environments, underground mixtapes, and on YouTube, with one of his audiobooks achieving over 100,000 "views" there. He lives in Pittsburgh, PA, without a dog, and records at The Bookquarium Recording Studio.


Praise from listeners:


"The vocals on this are fabulous. I loved listening and you will too! Great voice on this guy." - From a Scribd review


"Thee perfect voice for audiobooks! It is so listenable!" - From a YouTube comment


This audiobook consists of the following eight Jack London short stories:


To Build a Fire (1908 Version)Lost FaceThe Law of LifeLove of LifeAn Adventure in the Upper SeaA Nose for the KingAn Odyssey of the NorthA Thousand Deaths
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