Medical Apartheid: The Dark History of Medical Experimentation on Black Americans from Colonial Times to the Present

Tantor Media Inc

Narrated by Ron Butler

19 hr 3 min
4

Medical Apartheid is the first and only comprehensive history of medical experimentation on African Americans. Starting with the earliest encounters between black Americans and Western medical researchers and the racist pseudoscience that resulted, it details the ways both slaves and freedmen were used in hospitals for experiments conducted without their knowledge-a tradition that continues today within some black populations. It reveals how blacks have historically been prey to grave-robbing as well as unauthorized autopsies and dissections. Moving into the twentieth century, it shows how the pseudoscience of eugenics and social Darwinism were used to justify experimental exploitation and shoddy medical treatment of blacks. The product of years of prodigious research into medical journals and experimental reports long undisturbed, Medical Apartheid reveals the hidden underbelly of scientific research and makes possible, for the first time, an understanding of the roots of the African American health deficit.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Tantor Media Inc
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Published on
Mar 8, 2016
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Duration
19h 3m 0s
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ISBN
9781515972969
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Language
English
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Genres
History / African American
History / General
History / United States / General
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Export option
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Eligible for Family Library

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