The Radium Girls: The Dark Story of America’s Shining Women

Highbridge Audio

Narrated by Angela Brazil

15 hr 52 min
10

1917. As a war raged across the world, young American women flocked to work, painting watches, clocks and military dials with a special luminous substance made from radium. It was a fun job, lucrative and glamorous-the girls themselves shone brightly in the dark, covered head to toe in the dust from the paint. They were the radium girls. As the years passed, the women began to suffer from mysterious and crippling illnesses. The very thing that had made them feel alive-their work-was in fact slowly killing them: they had been poisoned by the radium paint. Yet their employers denied all responsibility. And so, in the face of unimaginable suffering-in the face of death-these courageous women refused to accept their fate quietly, and instead became determined to fight for justice. Drawing on previously unpublished sources-including diaries, letters, and court transcripts, as well as original interviews with the women's relatives-The Radium Girls is an intimate narrative account of an unforgettable true story. It is the powerful tale of a group of ordinary women from the Roaring Twenties, who themselves learned how to roar.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Highbridge Audio
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Published on
May 2, 2017
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Duration
15h 52m 40s
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ISBN
9781681684222
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Language
English
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Genres
Health & Fitness / General
Health & Fitness / Work-Related Health
History / General
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Eligible for Family Library

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