Big Data: A Revolution That Will Transform How We Live, Work, and Think

Recorded Books

Narrated by Jonathan Hogan

8 hr 36 min
2

Oxford professor and author Viktor Mayer-SchOnberger joins Economist data editor and commentator Kenneth Cukier to deliver insight into the hottest trend in technology. "Big data" makes it possible to instantly analyze and draw conclusions from vast stores of information, enabling revolutionary breakthroughs in business, health, politics and education. But big data also raises troubling social and privacy concerns sure to be a major talking point in the years ahead.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Recorded Books
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Published on
Jun 7, 2013
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Duration
8h 36m 40s
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ISBN
9781470370428
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Industries / Computers & Information Technology
Business & Economics / Information Management
Business & Economics / Management Science
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Eligible for Family Library

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Award-winning | Used by over 30 universities | Translated into 9 languages An introduction for everyone. In this rich, fascinating - surprisingly accessible - introduction, leading expert Eric Siegel reveals how predictive analytics works, and how it affects everyone every day. Rather than a “how to” for hands-on techies, the book serves lay readers and experts alike by covering new case studies and the latest state-of-the-art techniques. Prediction is booming. It reinvents industries and runs the world. Companies, governments, law enforcement, hospitals, and universities are seizing upon the power. These institutions predict whether you're going to click, buy, lie, or die. Why? For good reason: predicting human behavior combats risk, boosts sales, fortifies healthcare, streamlines manufacturing, conquers spam, optimizes social networks, toughens crime fighting, and wins elections. How? Prediction is powered by the world's most potent, flourishing unnatural resource: data. Accumulated in large part as the by-product of routine tasks, data is the unsalted, flavorless residue deposited en masse as organizations churn away. Surprise! This heap of refuse is a gold mine. Big data embodies an extraordinary wealth of experience from which to learn. Predictive Analytics unleashes the power of data. With this technology, the computer literally learns from data how to predict the future behavior of individuals. Perfect prediction is not possible, but putting odds on the future drives millions of decisions more effectively, determining whom to call, mail, investigate, incarcerate, set up on a date, or medicate. In this lucid, captivating introduction - now in its Revised and Updated edition - former Columbia University professor and Predictive Analytics World founder Eric Siegel reveals the power and perils of prediction: How does predictive analytics work? This jam-packed audiobook satisfies by demystifying the intriguing science under the hood. For future hands-on practitioners pursuing a career in the field, it sets a strong foundation, delivers the prerequisite knowledge, and whets your appetite for more. A truly omnipresent science, predictive analytics constantly affects our daily lives. Whether you are a consumer of it - or consumed by it - get a handle on the power of Predictive Analytics.
NEW YORK TIMES and WALL STREET JOURNAL BESTSELLER

ONE OF THE WASHINGTON POST'S 10 BEST BOOKS OF 2015


One of the world’s leading authorities on global security, Marc Goodman takes readers deep into the digital underground to expose the alarming ways criminals, corporations, and even countries are using new and emerging technologies against you—and how this makes everyone more vulnerable than ever imagined. 

Technological advances have benefited our world in immeasurable ways, but there is an ominous flip side: our technology can be turned against us. Hackers can activate baby monitors to spy on families, thieves are analyzing social media posts to plot home invasions, and stalkers are exploiting the GPS on smart phones to track their victims’ every move. We all know today’s criminals can steal identities, drain online bank accounts, and wipe out computer servers, but that’s just the beginning. To date, no computer has been created that could not be hacked—a sobering fact given our radical dependence on these machines for everything from our nation’s power grid to air traffic control to financial services. 
     Yet, as ubiquitous as technology seems today, just over the horizon is a tidal wave of scientific progress that will leave our heads spinning. If today’s Internet is the size of a golf ball, tomorrow’s will be the size of the sun. Welcome to the Internet of Things, a living, breathing, global information grid where every physical object will be online. But with greater connections come greater risks. Implantable medical devices such as pacemakers can be hacked to deliver a lethal jolt of electricity and a car’s brakes can be disabled at high speed from miles away. Meanwhile, 3-D printers can produce AK-47s, bioterrorists can download the recipe for Spanish flu, and cartels are using fleets of drones to ferry drugs across borders.
     With explosive insights based upon a career in law enforcement and counterterrorism, Marc Goodman takes readers on a vivid journey through the darkest recesses of the Internet. Reading like science fiction, but based in science fact, Future Crimes explores how bad actors are primed to hijack the technologies of tomorrow, including robotics, synthetic biology, nanotechnology, virtual reality, and artificial intelligence. These fields hold the power to create a world of unprecedented abundance and prosperity. But the technological bedrock upon which we are building our common future is deeply unstable and, like a house of cards, can come crashing down at any moment.
     Future Crimes provides a mind-blowing glimpse into the dark side of technological innovation and the unintended consequences of our connected world. Goodman offers a way out with clear steps we must take to survive the progress unfolding before us. Provocative, thrilling, and ultimately empowering, Future Crimes will serve as an urgent call to action that shows how we can take back control over our own devices and harness technology’s tremendous power for the betterment of humanity—before it’s too late.

Behind the bitter rivalry between Apple and Google—and how it's reshaping the way we think about technology

The rise of smartphones and tablets has altered the industry of making computers. At the center of this change are Apple and Google, two companies whose philosophies, leaders, and commercial acumen have steamrolled the competition. In the age of Android and the iPad, these corporations are locked in a feud that will play out not just in the mobile marketplace but in the courts and on screens around the world.
Fred Vogelstein has reported on this rivalry for more than a decade and has rare access to its major players. In Dogfight, he takes us into the offices and board rooms where company dogma translates into ruthless business; behind outsize personalities like Steve Jobs, Apple's now-lionized CEO, and Eric Schmidt, Google's executive chairman; and inside the deals, lawsuits, and allegations that mold the way we communicate. Apple and Google are poaching each other's employees. They bid up the price of each other's acquisitions for spite, and they forge alliances with major players like Facebook and Microsoft in pursuit of market dominance.
Dogfight reads like a novel: vivid nonfiction with never-before-heard details. This is more than a story about what devices will replace our cell phones and laptops. It's about who will control the content on those devices and where that content will come from—about the future of media and the Internet in Silicon Valley, New York, and Hollywood.

Everybody knows that a strong dollar equals a strong economy, bonds are safer than stocks, stocks are more volatile now and stop-losses are a smart, money-saving tactic . . . right? These are just a few widely believed but potentially dangerous market myths New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestselling author Ken Fisher dismantles in this wise, informative, wholly entertaining new book. As a long-term Forbes columnist and CEO of a global money management firm managing tens of billions for high-net-worth individuals and institutions, Ken knows a thing or two about what works and what's bunk when it comes to investing wisdom. Bringing together some of Ken's best myth debunking and market sleuthing of the past twenty-five years, in an easy-to-digest, bite-sized format, The Little Book of Market Myths exposes some of the most common-- and deadly-- myths investors swear by. And he demonstrates why subscribing to the rule-of-thumb approach to investing could prevent you from reaching your long-term investing goals. But this book is more than just a list of myths. One after another, Ken takes each commonly held belief or "surefire" strategy and explains why the myth persists, why it doesn't work and just how damaging it can be to your financial health. And each chapter is a primer on how you can apply the same "debunking" tactics yourself, now and for the rest of your investing time horizon. Whether you're a novice investor or a longtime veteran, this book arms you with priceless insights to help you identify major errors you may be committing and help you see the world clearer-- so you can improve your investing results. Fun, insightful, at times, irreverent, The Little Book of Investing Myths offers vivid proof of the old adage "the truth shall set you free"-- to increase the odds you achieve your long-term investing goals
When columnist Paul Downs was approached by the New York Times to write for their "You're the Boss" blog, he had been running his custom furniture business for 24 years strong-or, mostly strong. Now, he embarks on a book length essay that intends to show a portrait of a real business, with a real boss, a real set of employees, and the real challenges they face, in hopes of promoting a better understanding of the behaviors of small business owners. In 1986, fresh out of college, Paul Downs opened his first and last business, a small company that builds custom furniture. With no idea how to run a business, or how to build custom furniture, Downs spent a year teaching himself the business and in 1987, he hired his first employee. That's when things got complicated. As his business began to grow, he had to learn about management, cash flow, taxes, and so much more. Furthermore, globalization and the arrival of the internet made a big impact on the economy, causing him to have to re-evaluate, restructure, and reinvent. Most important, Downs is keenly aware that every small business, no matter the product it makes or the service it provides, starts with people. He writes with tremendous insight about hiring employees, providing motivation to get the best job out of them and incentive to maintain their loyalty and respect, and the difficult decisions he's made to let some of them go. His insights into each of his employees provides a window into how people work together in any professional situation, and how each of their identities lends to the strength and success of his business, both in daily output and end-of-year dividends. Downs also looks outward to his dealings with vendors, clients old and new, negotiating contracts and providing each client with exemplary customer service along each step of the way, from first sales pitch to final delivery. With honesty and conviction, Downs tells the true story behind building and sustaining a successful company in an ever-evolving economy, often airing his own failures and shortcomings to unveil the difficulties that arise from being a boss and a business person. We've heard countless stories from employees about their managers; Boss Life seeks to tell the other side of that story.
Why we need to think more like economists to successfully combat terrorism If we are to correctly assess the root causes of terrorism and successfully address the threat, we must think more like economists do. This is the argument of Alan Krueger's What Makes a Terrorist, a book that explains why our tactics in the fight against terrorism must be based on more than anecdote, intuition, and speculation. Many popular ideas about terrorists and why they seek to harm us are fueled by falsehoods, misinformation, and fearmongering. Many believe that poverty and lack of education breed terrorism, despite the wealth of evidence showing that most terrorists come from middle-class, and often college-educated, backgrounds. Krueger closely examines the factors that motivate individuals to participate in terrorism, drawing inferences from terrorists' own backgrounds and the economic, social, religious, and political environments in the societies from which they come. He describes which countries are the most likely breeding grounds for terrorists, and which ones are most likely to be their targets. Krueger addresses the economic and psychological consequences of terrorism and puts the threat squarely into perspective, revealing how our nation's sizable economy is diverse and resilient enough to withstand the comparatively limited effects of most terrorist strikes. He also calls on the media to be more responsible in reporting on terrorism. Bringing needed clarity to one of the greatest challenges of our generation, this 10th anniversary edition of What Makes a Terrorist features a new introduction by the author that discusses the lessons learned in the past decade from the rise of ISIS and events like the 2016 Pulse nightclub attack in Orlando, Florida. Author bio: Alan B. Krueger is the Bendheim Professor of Economics and Public Policy at Princeton University, former chairman of President Barack Obama's Council of Economic Advisers, and an adviser to the National Counterterrorism Center. He is the coauthor of Myth and Measurement: The New Economics of the Minimum Wage (Princeton) and Inequality in America. He lives in Princeton, New Jersey.
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