The Digital Banking Revolution: How financial technology companies are rapidly transforming the traditional retail banking industry through disruptive innovation.

Luigi Wewege

Narrated by Jim Cassidy

3 hr 16 min
1

Over the past decade financial service innovations have contributed to a completely new way in which customers can bank, threatening the status quo of traditional retail banks, and redefining a banking model which has been in place for generations. These new technological advancements have facilitated the rapid emergence of digital banking firms and FinTech companies, leading to established banks being forced to swiftly increase their pace of digital adoption to stay relevant and stop mass client attrition to these agile financial start-ups. These threats come at an inopportune time for banks due to mature markets currently experiencing stagnant growth. This coupled with decreasing profit margins due to the competitive pricing of new entrants, and financial customer loyalty becoming ever increasingly more tenuous.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Luigi Wewege
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Published on
Sep 1, 2017
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Duration
3h 16m 18s
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ISBN
9781509471690
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Banks & Banking
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Eligible for Family Library

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From the Hardcover edition.
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