Children Want to Write: Donald Graves and the Revolution in Children's Writing

Heinemann

Narrated by Thomas Newkirk, Penny Kittle, and Alan Huisman

Abridged8 hr 13 min

Children Want to Write is a collection of Donald Graves most significant writings paired with video that illuminates his research and his inspiring work with teachers. See the earliest documented use of invented spelling, the earliest attempts to guide young children through a writing process, the earliest conferences.

This collection allows you to see this revolutionary shift in writing instruction-with its emphasis on observation, reflection, and approaching children as writers.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Heinemann
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Published on
Sep 10, 2019
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Duration
8h 13m 33s
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ISBN
9780325118116
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Language
English
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Genres
Education / General
Education / Teaching Methods & Materials / General
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Eligible for Family Library

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What you need to know about grammar and writing as taught widely in colleges, high schools, and grammar schools wherever American English is spoken!
William Strunk, Professor at Cornell, wrote his famous Little Book on good grammar and writing to simplify the subject for students far and wide. His famous motto was, "Omit needless words." This unabridged version follows this motto and can be listened to in just 60 minutes!
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