The British statesman, Benjamin Disraeli, who was twice prime minister, also achieved great fame as a novelist. His early ‘silver fork’ novels, including ‘Vivian Grey’, featured romanticised depictions of aristocratic life, while his celebrated masterpiece, the ‘Young England’ trilogy, is charged with political insight, espousing the belief that England's future as a world power depended not on the complacent ‘old guard’, but on youthful, idealistic politicians. This comprehensive eBook presents Disraeli’s complete fictional works, with numerous illustrations, rare texts appearing in digital print for the first time, informative introductions and the usual Delphi bonus material. (Version 1)


* Beautifully illustrated with images relating to Disraeli’s life and works

* Concise introductions to the novels and other texts

* All 15 novels, with individual contents tables

* Special ‘Young England’ trilogy contents table

* Includes rare novels appearing for the first time in digital publishing, including FALCONET, Disraeli’s unfinished novel

* Images of how the books were first published, giving your eReader a taste of the original texts

* Excellent formatting of the texts

* Famous works such as VIVIAN GREY are fully illustrated with their original artwork

* Includes Disraeli’s rare epic poem and other poetry works – available in no other collection

* Includes Disraeli’s plays - spend hours exploring the author’s diverse works

* Features two biographies - discover Disraeli’s literary life

* Scholarly ordering of texts into chronological order and literary genres


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CONTENTS:


The Young England Trilogy


The Novels

VIVIAN GREY

THE VOYAGE OF CAPTAIN POPANILLA

THE YOUNG DUKE

CONTARINI FLEMING

THE WONDROUS TALE OF ALROY

THE RISE OF ISKANDER

THE INFERNAL MARRIAGE

HENRIETTA TEMPLE

VENETIA

CONINGSBY

SYBIL

TANCRED

LOTHAIR

ENDYMION

FALCONET


The Shorter Fiction

A TRUE STORY

IXION IN HEAVEN

SKETCHES


The Plays

THE SPEAKING HARLEQUIN

THE TRAGEDY OF COUNT ALARCOS


The Poetry

THE REVOLUTIONARY EPICK, AND OTHER POEMS

MISCELLANEOUS POEMS


The Non-Fiction

THE SPIRIT OF WHIGGISM

LORD GEORGE BENTINCK

ON THE LIFE AND WRITINGS OF MR. ISAAC DISRAELI BY HIS SON

SPEECHES

WIT AND WISDOM OF THE EARL OF BEACONSFIELD


The Biographies

BENJAMIN D’ISRAELI by Thomas Edward Kebbel

BENJAMIN DISRAELI, EARL OF BEACONSFIELD by James Bryce


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Lord George Bentinck is an account of Disraeli's relation with his parliamentary colleague and friend. It is not simply an account of the battle over the Corn Laws with Sir Robert Peel, but a most remarkable book, extremely readable, and full of often quoted and apt comments and descriptions. As a vivid story of one of the great parliamentary dramas in British history it is unsurpassed. The portraits of both Bentinck and Peel are both sympathetic and just. The book provides insight into mid-nineteenth century parliamentary life that remains unsurpassed.

It is hard to overstate the bitterness and fury which Peel's decision to repeal the Corn Laws had provoked in British politics. One biographer of Disraeli, Robert Blake, spoke of "Home Rule in 1886 and Munich in 1938 as the nearest parallels". Friendships were sundered, families divided, and the feuds of politics carried into private life to a degree quite unusual in British history. Those who are interested in the details of parliamentary warfare which raged until Peel's fall from power should consult Lord George Bentinck.

But the worth of this book goes beyond constitutional history or even the Irish food famine. Disraeli helps explain the intellectual and ideological grounds of the Young England Movement: a conservative force that aimed at a union of discontented industrial workers with aristocratic landowners and against factious Whigs, selfish factory owners and dissenting shopkeepers. In forging such a policy of principle, the Conservatives, as Disraeli's book well demonstrates, became a minority party but one which carried the full weight of moral politics.

Lord George Bentinck is an account of Disraeli's relation with his parliamentary colleague and friend. It is not simply an account of the battle over the Corn Laws with Sir Robert Peel, but a most remarkable book, extremely readable, and full of often quoted and apt comments and descriptions. As a vivid story of one of the great parliamentary dramas in British history it is unsurpassed. The portraits of both Bentinck and Peel are both sympathetic and just. The book provides insight into mid-nineteenth century parliamentary life that remains unsurpassed.

It is hard to overstate the bitterness and fury which Peel's decision to repeal the Corn Laws had provoked in British politics. One biographer of Disraeli, Robert Blake, spoke of "Home Rule in 1886 and Munich in 1938 as the nearest parallels". Friendships were sundered, families divided, and the feuds of politics carried into private life to a degree quite unusual in British history. Those who are interested in the details of parliamentary warfare which raged until Peel's fall from power should consult Lord George Bentinck.

But the worth of this book goes beyond constitutional history or even the Irish food famine. Disraeli helps explain the intellectual and ideological grounds of the Young England Movement: a conservative force that aimed at a union of discontented industrial workers with aristocratic landowners and against factious Whigs, selfish factory owners and dissenting shopkeepers. In forging such a policy of principle, the Conservatives, as Disraeli's book well demonstrates, became a minority party but one which carried the full weight of moral politics.

Welcome to the 3 Books To Know series, our idea is to help readers learn about fascinating topics through three essential and relevant books. These carefully selected works can be fiction, non-fiction, historical documents or even biographies. We will always select for you three great works to instigate your mind, this time the topic is: Social Novel: Sybil - Benjamin Disraeli Les Misérables - Victor Hugo Germinal - Émile Zola Social novel is a work of fiction in which a social problem is dramatized through its effect on the characters. Usually a social novel limits itself to exposure of a problem. A personal solution may be arrived at by the novel's characters, but the author does not insist that it can be applied universally or that it is the only one. Benjamin Disraeli's Sybil is one of the first social-problem novels. Sibyl deals with the social and economic disparity between the rich and the poor — as a result of the Industrial Revolution. Les Misérables is the magnum opus of the French writer Victor Hugo. It narrates the French political and social situation in the Democratic Uprising. The book draws a critical parallel to the material development of society and the consequent exclusion of poor people. Germinal is Zola's masterpiece and one of the most significant novels in the French tradition. The story takes place in France during a strike caused by the reduction of wages. To compose Germinal, the author spent two months working as a miner in the extraction of coal. Zola describes the principle of the political and trade union organization of the working class, such as the existing divisions between Marxists and anarchists. This is one of many books in the series 3 Books To Know. If you liked this book, look for the other titles in the series, we are sure you will like some of the topics.
The revelation that a long forgotten novel first published anonymously in 1834 is the work of Benjamin Disraeli and his sister Sarah is an exciting literary event. Newly discovered letters between brother and sister prove without doubt that it was written jointly by them. We do not have to look far for the reason for their secrecy. The vividly described election which forms the centrepiece of the story is clearly based on Disraeli's recent experiences as an unsuccessful candidate in two elections at High Wycombe. His political career had a long way to go and the last thing he wanted was to jeopardize it by revealing his motives in the past or his hopes for the future.

The hero, Aubrey Bohun, has, like Disraeli, recently returned from mysterious travels in the East, but unlike him has his own castle and an income of £30,000 a year. Bohun obviously contains an element of wish fulfilment and allows the authors to incorporate in the novel elements of wish fulfilment and allows the authors to incorporate in the novel elements of a popular genre known in its day as 'silver fork' fiction – revelations of high life. Although there is much of this and of melodrama too, there is also some splendid social irony.

Michael Foot says 'the volume is quite fit to takes its place in the true Disraeli canon and contains many gems which add fresh gleams to the portrait of Disraeli himself.'

Two appendixes explain the literary detection that proved the book's authorship and the parallels between the politics of Aubrey Bohun and Disraeli.

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