Ebooks

CANNABIS FOR SENIORS is written for independent seniors - as well as for family members and caretakers seeking ways to manage their everyday health concerns without resorting to powerful, habit-forming, potentially dangerous medications.

CANNABIS FOR SENIORS reviews the latest scientific research regarding the health effects of marijuana and the effectiveness of various cannabis strains for managing specific health conditions.

It also presents anecdotal reports on cannabis use by seniors – so readers can learn about people “just like them” who have tried medical marijuana and had good results.

It addresses the myths and worries that many seniors have about marijuana use showing which concerns are founded in fact and which are simply based on inadequate or partial information.

CANNABIS FOR SENIORS discusses various methods of administering medical marijuana, explaining which conditions are best handled by smoking, eating, or using skin patches containing active medicinal cannabis components.

It deals in detail with the major conditions that cannabis can help:
• Sleep issues
• Depression
• Alzheimer’s disease
• Chronic pain
• Anxiety
• Digestive disorders
• Cancer
• Glaucoma
• Multiple sclerosis
• Parkinson’s disease
• Concussions
• Stroke
• …….and many more

For each condition, CANNABIS FOR SENIORS explains the scientific research and personal anecdotes supporting use of medical marijuana; helping seniors decide for themselves, or with the help of a caregiver, how best to cope with their personal health situations.

CANNABIS FOR SENIORS also discusses social elements of life that are facilitated by marijuana. Research shows that seniors who remain connected to friends, family members and community live longer, happier and healthier lives. The book shows how medical marijuana can help with these important social connections.
What Are Terpenes?

Terpenes (pronounced tur-peens), or terpenoids, are aromatic metabolites found in the oils of all plants. Terpenes are chemical oils produced by plants that create the unique flavor, scent and effect of herbs, fruit and flowers. When smelling a flower or herb, your nose actually registers the unique terpene profile of the plant. More than 30,000 unique terpenes have been identified in plants, animals, microbes, and fungi, which create aromas and flavors. Terpenes help carry out biological functions, can serve as vitamins, pheromones, and hormones as well as influence the immune system. When combined, terpenes produce complex profiles. For example, the herb lavender smells pleasant, tastes slightly sweet and floral, and has a relaxing effect.

Terpenes are secreted along with cannabinoids in the flower’s sticky resin glands. They are responsible for cannabis’ smell, flavor and contribute to its overall sensory effect. Terpenes give the Blueberry cannabis strain its berry smell, Sour Diesel its skunky smell, and Lavender its floral aroma. Over 100 different terpenes have been identified in the cannabis plant, and every strain tends toward a unique terpene type and composition. Terpenes play a key role in differentiating the effects of various cannabis strains. Terpenoid production evolved over time in plants, including cannabis, to attract pollinators and to act as defense compounds. Female cannabis plants produce glandular trichomes, which are glands that look like small hairs or growths that protrude from the flowers and leaves. Trichomes house crucial compounds, including cannabinoids (such as THC and CBD), flavonoids, and terpenes.

Terpenes and cannabinoids interact synergistically to promote relaxation and stress-relief, while others promote focus and acuity. The effect profile of a given terpene can change when combined with other terpenes and cannabinoids in a phenomenon known as the entourage effect. Research suggests that terpenes offer medicinal value as they mediate our body’s interaction with therapeutic cannabinoids.

Technology has developed a method of distilling terpenes into highly concentrated forms that can be used individually or in conjunction with other terpenes. Terpene isolates are commonly used in cosmetic products, incense, food flavorings, perfumes, natural medicines and a wide variety of everyday products.

Pure, isolated terpenes are highly concentrated and may pose health risks if consumed or applied to the skin with out proper dilution. Working with terpenes is shaman-like, calling on an understanding the terpene to safely unlocking their amazing potential. For instance, certain varietals are more potent than others, meaning that one dilution method cannot be applied to every type of terpene. Achieving balance can be tricky but well worth the personal learning needed. -- Beverly Potter
We have freedom of speech but we’re afraid to speak. Our lives have become subjected to PC tyranny—a constant fear of “offending” someone. We think that we are independent and that it is the other guy who is influenced, brainwashed, duped, persuaded. We feel like we think for ourselves. How can we “feel” otherwise? There’s no way to know because countless influences and interactions have molded us.

We’re members of various groups—circles of friends, family, professional groups, hobby group, and workplace groups. Groups have a way of developing a view that it imposes with a kind of group-think. We want to belong, to be liked and included so go along and get along. We don’t make waves by questioning. If we have a different view, we keep it to ourselves. Why rock the boat?

Thinking for yourself is not so easy. When encountering an argument to a long held opinion or a wild idea, we use critical thinking to evaluate it, as we were taught to do in school. The problem is that critical thinking is critical. It focuses our thinking on the negative—what doesn’t work, what’s wrong with the idea—and encourages my-side thinking where we evaluate evidence in a way that favors our beliefs and entraps us into closed-mindedness. Thinking for yourself requires open-mindedness. Open-mindedness is being receptive and, when the issue is important, calls for actively searching for evidence against your beliefs.

Thinking is not driven by answers but by questions. Every intellectual field is born out of a cluster of questions to which answers are needed. Had no questions been asked by those who laid the foundation for a field — for example, Physics or Biology — the field would never have been developed.

We define tasks, express problems and delineate issues with questions. Answers signal an end point and stop thought, except when an answer generates a further question.

Timothy Leary said, ”to think for yourself you must question authority”. To think, you must question. To think through or rethink anything, one must ask questions that stimulate thought. The quality of your questions determines the quality of your thinking.

Thinking begins within some content when questions are generated. No questions equals no understanding. To engage in thinking through your content you must stimulate your thinking with questions that lead to further questions.

Our own opinions is one authority we should frequently question. Times change. We change. Perspectives and values change. Book explores how opinions and values we held in the past need periodic evaluation and challenge. Independent thinkers evolve and need to shed the shackles of old views and opinions.

Ridicule is the strongest weapon for pressing us to conform. It is a kind of bait that if you go for it will entrap you in an argument you can’t win and leave you looking ridiculous and deflated. Question Authority; Think for Yourself offers techniques, with examples, of how to deflect attacks, side-tracks, and put-downs.

If you’ve bitten your tongue and later wished you’d spoken up and not been cowed into silence by a mocking co-worker when you revealed a “politically incorrect” viewpoint, you’ll find much of interest in Question Authority; Think for Yourself .
Dogs are wo-man’s best friend. Dogs are family. We love them and they loves us back—unconditionally. Like we humans, dogs get ailments.

They may experience anxieties and stress. As they age, dogs suffer aches and pains, just like we do. So we take our canine friend to the local veterinarian to tend to their ailment. Often, the Vet prescribes medication—a powerful pharmaceutical, which is usually effective, although not always. Pharmaceuticals, like opioids, can be addictive and have other worrisome side-effects. Now a safer alternative is emerging—cannabis for canines.

Administration of cannabis and cannabis-based extracts to benefit over-all health and well-being are used by humans to treat an array of ailments. There is much to suggest that cannabis may benefit dogs as well. Many dog-moms and dads are giving cannabis potions to their pooches—with good results.

The problem is that as a result of cannabis being classified as a Schedule 1 Drug by federal law since the 1930s, there has been little research. Veterinarian have no training in cannabis therapeutics and risk “losing their license” if they recommend it. And, until recently, cannabis was not readily available to the law-abiding dog owner.

CANNABIS FOR CANINES explains cannabis therapeutics: how they can soothe many physical and psychological conditions and be used in conjunction with pharmaceutical medications, as well as preventatively. CANNABIS FOR CANINES describes cannabinoids, which are chemicals in the plant, and how they interact with a dog’s endocannabinoid system to soothe their distress. Readers learn the importance of close observation and how to track conditions as a way to check for effectiveness of the treatment and the importance of keeping their Vet in the loop, especially if the dog is taking a pharmaceutical. Precautions are included. CANNABIS FOR CANINES is a fun, informative read of interest to dog owners and canine professionals.
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