The Internet and smartphone are just the latest in a 250-year- long cycle of disruption that has continuously changed the way we live, the way we work and the way we interact. The coming Augmented Age, however, promises a level of disruption, behavioural shifts and changes that are unparalleled. While consumers today are camping outside of an Apple store waiting to be one of the first to score a new Apple Watch or iPhone, the next generation of wearables will be able to predict if we’re likely to have a heart attack and recommend a course of action. We watch news of Google’s self-driving cars, but don’t likely realise this means progressive cities will have to ban human drivers in the next decade because us humans are too risky.

Following on from the Industrial or machine age, the space age and the digital age, the Augmented Age will be based on four key disruptive themes—Artificial Intelligence, Experience Design, Smart Infrastructure, and HealthTech. Historically the previous ‘ages’ bought significant disruption and changes, but on a net basis jobs were created, wealth was enhanced, and the health and security of society improved. What will the Augmented Age bring? Will robots take our jobs, and AI’s subsume us as inferior intelligences, or will this usher in a new age of abundance?

Augmented is a book on future history, but more than that, it is a story about how you will live your life in a world that will change more in the next 20 years than it has in the last 250 years. Are you ready to adapt? Because if history proves anything, you don't have much of a choice.
The future of banking is already here — are you ready?

Bank 4.0 explores the radical transformation already taking place in banking, and follows it to its logical conclusion. What will banking look like in 30 years? 50 years? The world’s best banks have been forced to adapt to changing consumer behaviors; regulators are rethinking friction, licensing and regulation; Fintech start-ups and tech giants are redefining how banking fits in the daily life of consumers. To survive, banks are having to develop new capabilities, new jobs and new skills. The future of banking is not just about new thinking around value stores, payment and credit utility — it’s embedded in voice-based smart assistants like Alexa and Siri and soon smart glasses which will guide you on daily spending and money decisions. The coming Bank 4.0 era is one where either your bank is embedded in your world via tech, or it no longer exists.

In this final volume in Brett King’s BANK series, we explore the future of banks amidst the evolution of technology and discover a revolution already at work. From re-engineered banking systems, to selfie-pay and self-driving cars, Bank 4.0 proves that we’re not on Wall Street anymore. Bank 4.0 will help you:

Understand the historical precedents that flag a fundamental rethinking in banking Discover low-friction, technology experiences that undermine the products we sell today Think through the evolution of identity, value and assets as cash and cards become obsolete Learn how Fintech and tech “disruptors” are using behaviour, psychology and technology to reshape the economics of banking Examine the ways in which blockchain, A.I., augmented reality and other leading-edge tech are the real building blocks of the future of banking systems

If you look at individual technologies or startups disrupting the space, you might miss the biggest signposts to the future and you might also miss that most of we’ve learned about banking the last 700 years just isn’t useful.

When the biggest bank in the world isn’t any of the names you’d expect, when branch networks are a burden not an asset, and when advice is the domain of Artificial Intelligence, we may very well have to start from scratch. Bank 4.0 takes you to a world where banking will be instant, smart and ubiquitous, and where you’ll have to adapt faster than ever before just to survive. Welcome to the future.

Use IBM WebSphere sMash to Rapidly Deliver Scalable, Flexible Web 2.0 Applications

With the radically new IBM WebSphere sMash and the Project Zero platform, it’s far easier to develop, assemble, and run applications and mashups that align tightly with SOA enterprise infrastructures. Getting Started with IBM WebSphere sMash covers all aspects of architecting, designing, and developing solutions with these breakthrough technologies.

Authored by three IBM leading sMash experts, this practical tutorial shows how to create state-of-the-art web applications far more rapidly than you ever could with traditional Java or .NET enterprise platforms.

As you walk through sample projects based on real-life scenarios, you’ll master both basic and advanced sMash features, ranging from request handling to event processing, database access to security. You’ll also learn agile best practices for consistently writing better web applications, delivering them sooner, and getting more value from them.

Coverage includes

Installing and configuring IBM WebSphere sMash, and choosing your development environment Creating handlers to efficiently service all types of requests Understanding sMash’s “convention over configuration” approach, and knowing when to override convention Rendering responses that include visual content, data, and other resources Connecting with databases via Project Zero’s powerful data access API Using sMash’s security model to protect inbound and outbound connections Building more flexible applications with sMash’s sophisticated event processing Extending sMash development to non-programmers with Assemble Flow Programming client-side code with the Dojo Toolkit Taking advantage of sMash’s PHP support
The ideas of Max Wertheimer (1880-1943), a founder of Gestalt theory, are discussed in almost all general books on the history of psychology, and in most introductory textbooks on psychology. This intellectual biography of Wertheimer is the first book-length treatment of a scholar whose ideas are recognized as of central importance to fields as varied as social psychology, cognitive neuroscience, problem solving, art, and visual neuroscience.

King and Wertheimer trace the origins of Gestalt thought, demonstrating its continuing importance in fifteen chapters and several supplements to these chapters. They begin by reviewing Wertheimer's ancestry, family, and childhood in central Europe, and his formal education. They elaborate on his activities during the period in which he developed the ideas that were later to become central to Gestalt psychology, documenting the formal emergence of this school of thought and tracing its development during World War I. The maturation of the Gestalt school at the University of Berlin during 1922-29 is discussed in detail.

Wertheimer's everyday life in America during his last decade is well documented, based in part on his son's recollections. The early reception of Gestalt theory in the United States is examined, with extensive references to articles in professional journals and periodicals. Wertheimer's relationships and interaction with three prominent psychologists of the time, Edwin Boring, Clark Hull, and Alexander Luria, are discussed, based on previosly unpublished correspondence. The final chapters discuss Wertheimer's essays on democracy, freedom, ethics, and truth, detail personal challenges Wertheimer faced during his last years. His major work, published after his death, is Productive Thinking. Its reception is examined, and a concluding chapter considers recent responses to Max Wertheimer and Gestalt theory.

This intellectual biography will be of interest to psychologists and readers interested in science, modern European history, and the Holocaust.

D. Brett King is senior instructor of psychology, Department of Psychology, University of Colorado at Boulder.

Michael Wertheimer is Professor Emeritus of Psychology, University of Colorado at Boulder.
The future of banking is already here — are you ready?

Bank 4.0 explores the radical transformation already taking place in banking, and follows it to its logical conclusion. What will banking look like in 30 years? 50 years? The world’s best banks have been forced to adapt to changing consumer behaviors; regulators are rethinking friction, licensing and regulation; Fintech start-ups and tech giants are redefining how banking fits in the daily life of consumers. To survive, banks are having to develop new capabilities, new jobs and new skills. The future of banking is not just about new thinking around value stores, payment and credit utility — it’s embedded in voice-based smart assistants like Alexa and Siri and soon smart glasses which will guide you on daily spending and money decisions. The coming Bank 4.0 era is one where either your bank is embedded in your world via tech, or it no longer exists.

In this final volume in Brett King’s BANK series, we explore the future of banks amidst the evolution of technology and discover a revolution already at work. From re-engineered banking systems, to selfie-pay and self-driving cars, Bank 4.0 proves that we’re not on Wall Street anymore. Bank 4.0 will help you:

Understand the historical precedents that flag a fundamental rethinking in banking Discover low-friction, technology experiences that undermine the products we sell today Think through the evolution of identity, value and assets as cash and cards become obsolete Learn how Fintech and tech “disruptors” are using behaviour, psychology and technology to reshape the economics of banking Examine the ways in which blockchain, A.I., augmented reality and other leading-edge tech are the real building blocks of the future of banking systems

If you look at individual technologies or startups disrupting the space, you might miss the biggest signposts to the future and you might also miss that most of we’ve learned about banking the last 700 years just isn’t useful.

When the biggest bank in the world isn’t any of the names you’d expect, when branch networks are a burden not an asset, and when advice is the domain of Artificial Intelligence, we may very well have to start from scratch. Bank 4.0 takes you to a world where banking will be instant, smart and ubiquitous, and where you’ll have to adapt faster than ever before just to survive. Welcome to the future.

The Internet and smartphone are just the latest in a 250-year-long cycle of disruption that has continuously changed the way we live, the way we work, and the way we interact. The coming Augmented Age, however, promises a level of disruption, behavioral shifts, and changes that are unparalleled. While consumers today are camping outside of an Apple store waiting to be one of the first to score a new Apple Watch or iPhone, the next generation of wearables will be able to predict if we're likely to have a heart attack and recommend a course of action. We watch news of Google's self-driving cars, but don't likely realize this means progressive cities will have to ban human drives in the next decade because us humans are too risky. Following on from the Industrial or Machine Age, the Space Age and the Digital Age, the Augmented Age will be based on four key disruptive themes-Artificial Intelligence, Experience Design, Smart Infrastructure, and HealthTech. Historically the previous "ages" bought significant disruption and changes, but on a net basis jobs were created, wealth was enhanced, and the health and security of society improved. What will the Augmented Age bring? Will robots take our jobs, and AI's subsume us as inferior intelligences, or will this usher in a new age of abundance? Augmented is a book on future history, but more than that, it is a story about how you will live your life in a world that will change more in the next twenty years than it has in the last 250 years. Are you ready to adapt? Because if history proves anything, you don't have much of a choice.
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