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With over 400 types of psychotherapy available, ranging from the highly effective to the highly questionable to the downright fraudulent, the task of choosing a therapist can be daunting. Now, Am I Crazy Or Is My Shrink? gives you all the information you need to get the most effective help and to know when your therapy is working--or when it's time for a change. Drawing on years of practical experience and the most up-to-date research, the authors give you expert guidance on all the issues you should consider, whether you're seeking therapy or uncertain about the therapy you're receiving: What questions should I ask my therapist about a recommended treatment? What personal qualities and professional qualifications should I look for in a therapist? What do research studies say about the effectiveness of a particular therapy? How do I recognize when a therapist is not right for me? How can I tell when my therapist's behavior is unethical or unprofessional? What strategies can I use to evaluate my progress? The authors also provide an overview of the main branches of psychotherapy and suggest which approaches are best suited to the most commonly occurring problems, such as depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorders, eating disorders, relationship and sexual difficulties, and many others. Finally, the authors stress that because therapies don't come with warning labels, and because a therapist will typically apply his or her theory to whoever walks through the door, regardless of their unique symptoms and circumstances, it is essential to choose your therapist wisely, with as much forethought as possible. Am I Crazy Or Is My Shrink? empowers you to make that choice with confidence and to be a knowledgeable participant in your own treatment.
This completely updated second edition of Comprehensive Textbook of Psychotherapy discusses the contemporary landscape of psychotherapy, honors its complexities, and focuses on history, theory, science, practice, and diversity. The book is divided into three parts: (1) Models of Psychotherapy; (2) Psychotherapy by Modalities and Populations, and (3) Research Methods and Randomized Clinical Trials, Professional Issues, and New Directions in Psychotherapy. Part 1 has been expanded to include two chapters on Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT). This section now details the similarities and differences that exist across models, in an effort to articulate overarching principles of human change and stability processes that are advanced through professional practice. Chapters in Part 1 are organized into sets of two; each set has a theory chapter covering one of the six psychotherapy models discussed, followed by a practice chapter that conveys and illustrates the use of the model in a specific application, including a detailed case example. Part 2 addresses modalities of psychotherapy such as group, family, and electronic-based approaches, as well as psychotherapy with specific populations such as children and adolescents, older adults, and women. This section, too, has been expanded to include treatment of people in the schizophrenia spectrum, a chapter on treatment of immigrants and refugees, and another on working with men. There are also new chapters on working with military personnel and veterans, and a chapter on treating survivors of trauma, specifically on those exposed to mass trauma. Still another new chapter is included on working with psychological emergencies. Part 3 covers research methods and randomized clinical trials, the training of psychotherapists, ethics and legal matters, and the future of psychotherapy. Research and diversity are emphasized in each chapter and throughout the book. This new edition of a classic textbook will be valuable to instructors and students, psychotherapists-in-training, practitioners, and supervisors alike.
During the past decade, we have witnessed a dramatic transformation in the nature and uses of terrorism. In the 70s, it was often repeated that terrorists "want a lot of people watching, not a lot of people dead"; today, it is more accurate to say that terrorists want a lot of people dead, and even more people crippled by fear and grief. A major strategic intent of modern terrorists is to use larger scale physical attacks to cause stress in the general population. These changes in terrorist strategy have made it clear that we need better psychological and social responses to terrorism and man-made disasters. The psychological science needed to provide proper and effective treatment for victims of horrendous events, such as September 11th, and future potential terrorist acts, simply does not exist, so military, medical, and psychological experts must work together to improve their understanding of mass casualty terrorism. In Psychology of Terrorism leading national and international experts present the first results of this effort, including the newest findings on treatment of and clinical responses to terrorism along with their respective underlying theories. They address the history of terrorism; types and effects of weapons of mass destruction or disruption; the role of the military, government agencies, and volunteer groups in responding to terrorist threats; psychological consequences of terrorism; and treatment of special populations such as children and older adults. This volume will be an ideal text for both academic and professional courses as well as a comprehensive resource for mental health clinicians and researchers, medical care providers, educators, public health specialists, government employees, police and fire departments, and non-profit agencies that provide services and craft policy.
High profile media reports of young people committing suicide after experiencing bullying have propelled a national conversation about the nature and scope of this problem and the means to address it. Specialists have long known that involvement in bullying in any capacity (as the victim or as the perpetrator) is associated with higher rates of suicidal ideation and behaviors, but evidence about which bullying subtype is at greatest risk is more mixed. For instance, some studies have shown that the association between suicidal ideation and bullying is stronger for targets of bullying than perpetrators. However, another study found that after controlling for depression, the association was strongest for perpetrators. Similar disagreement persists with regard to gender disparities relating to bullying and self-harm, for instance. Youth Suicide and Bullying presents an authoritative review of the science demonstrating the links between these two major public health concerns alongside informed discussion and evidence-based recommendations. The volume provides sound, scientifically grounded, and effective advice about bullying and suicide at every level: national, state, and community. Chapters provide details on models of interpersonal aggression; groups at risk for both bullying and suicide (such as sexual minorities); the role of stigma; family, school, and community-based youth bullying and suicide prevention programs, and more. Each chapter concludes with recommendations for mental health providers, educators, and policymakers. Compiling knowledge from the most informed experts and providing authoritative research-based information, this volume supports efforts to better understand and thereby reduce the prevalence of victimization and suicide.
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