"It's not that we're dumb. We're wired to avoid pain and pursue pleasure and security. It feels right to sell when everyone around us is scared and buy when everyone feels great. It may feel right-but it's not rational."
-From The Behavior Gap

 


Why do we lose money? It's easy to blame the economy or the financial markets-but the real trouble lies in the decisions we make.

As a financial planner, Carl Richards grew frustrated watching people he cared about make the same mistakes over and over. They were letting emotion get in the way of smart financial decisions. He named this phenomenon-the distance between what we should do and what we actually do-"the behavior gap." Using simple drawings to explain the gap, he found that once people understood it, they started doing much better.

Richards's way with words and images has attracted a loyal following to his blog posts for The New York Times, appearances on National Public Radio, and his columns and lectures. His book will teach you how to rethink all kinds of situations where your perfectly natural instincts (for safety or success) can cost you money and peace of mind.

He'll help you to:



   • Avoid the tendency to buy high and sell low;
   • Avoid the pitfalls of generic financial advice;
   • Invest all of your assets-time and energy as well as savings-more wisely;
   • Quit spending money and time on things that don't matter;
   • Identify your real financial goals;
   • Start meaningful conversations about money;
   • Simplify your financial life;
   • Stop losing money!

 

It's never too late to make a fresh financial start. As Richards writes: "We've all made mistakes, but now it's time to give yourself permission to review those mistakes, identify your personal behavior gaps, and make a plan to avoid them in the future. The goal isn't to make the 'perfect' decision about money every time, but to do the best we can and move forward. Most of the time, that's enough."

Whenever I tell people about my job as a financial advisor, the conversation inevitably turns to how hopeless they feel when it comes to dealing with money. More than once, they’ve begged, “Just tell me what to do.”

It’s no surprise that even my most successful friends feel confused or paralyzed. Even if they have a shelfful of personal finance books, they don’t have time to make sense of all the information available. They don’t just want good advice, they want the best advice—so rather than do the “wrong thing,” they do nothing. Their 401(k) and bank statements pile up, unexamined or maybe even unopened.

What they don’t realize is that bad calls about money aren’t failures; they’re just what happens when emotional creatures have to make decisions about the future with limited information. What I tell them is that we need to scrap striving for perfection and instead commit to a process of guessing and making adjustments when things go off track. Of course we’re going to make the best guesses we can—but we’re not going to obsess over getting them exactly right.

The fact is, in a single page you can prioritize what you really want in life and figure out how to get there. That’s because a great financial plan has nothing to do with what the markets are doing, what your real estate agent is pitching, or the hot stock your brother-in-law told you about. It has everything to do with what’s most important to you.

By now you may be wondering, “What about the details? How much do I need to invest each year, and how do I allocate it? How much life insurance do I need?” Don’t worry: I’ll cover those topics and many more, sharing strategies that will take the complexity out of them.

The most important thing is getting clarity about the big picture so you can cope with the unexpected. Maybe you’ll lose the job you thought was secure; you’ll take a financial risk that doesn’t pan out; you’ll have twins when you were only budgeting for one. In other words: Life will happen.

But no matter what happens, this book will help you bridge the gap between where you are now and where you want to go.

When it was originally published in 1971, Selective Trout was universally acclaimed as the most revolutionary approach to aquatic insect imitation in the twentieth century. Using common sense, science, and imagination, authors Doug Swisher and Carl Richards developed a wide array of new patterns that were in sharp contrast to those offerings used by American fly fishermen up to that time. Their radical no-hackle dry fly, in particular, proved to be a more convincing, natural silhouette than anything anglers had ever seen before. With hatch charts covering different regions of the country, and featuring detailed tying instructions for flies that could be used in those regions, all liberally illustrated, the book provided anglers with a new arsenal of deadly fly patterns. Thirty years later, and after more than 200,000 copies of the first edition had been sold, a Thirtieth Anniversary Edition was brought out. Updated and revised by the authors, with new observations on trout behavior as well as detailed instructions on how to keep useful fishing logs, the book also featured detailed appendices on terrestrials, mayflies, caddisflies, and stoneflies. Not only that, but the new edition included hundreds of color illustrations by the renowned artist and fly-fishing innovator Dave Whitlock. It’s hard to imagine how anything could top that. In this new paperback edition of Selective Trout we know that we can’t top what’s been done previously. But we do know that this deserves to stay in print, because it’s the type of book that every fly fisherman should own and read. To add a new twist to this new edition, what we have done is added a new introduction by Doug Swisher (Carl Richards passed away in 2006), plus a new foreword by Nick Lyons, the book publisher who had the foresight to get behind the book in the first place.
?你是不是覺得理財很困難?

看了很多理財書,卻仍不知道從何開始?

本書用最簡單的方法,助你解決最困難的金錢問題,

不論景氣好壞,不管股市漲跌,都不用再為錢煩惱!

釐清觀念,一張 A4 搞定理財規劃!


大部分的理財書籍、雜誌及網站都提供讀者太多選擇,反而讓人感到更困惑。不只是你,許多在商業、科學或藝術界的傑出人士,都放棄理財,因為他們跟你一樣,根本不知道該從何開始。


事實上,用一張紙就可以做好理財規劃。一個很棒的理財規劃和市場如何表現無關,和跟你推銷房屋的仲介無關,也和你姊夫告訴你哪支明牌股票無關。理財規劃跟「對你而言最重要的事」息息相關,本書會引領你找出自己的答案,做出真正屬於自己的理財規劃(而且很簡單)!


最簡單的理財方法!


本書只教你最簡單的理財方法: 60/40 法則。先鋒集團(Vanguard Group)的創辦人約翰.柏格(John Bogle)曾說:「也許有比 60/40 法則更好的投資方法,但是比這個原則糟的卻多到數不清。」也就是說,一定會有其他更好的投資方法,不過 60/40 法則就能讓你的理財規劃勝過大部分的人。


這本書請你買兩本,一本給自己,一本給你的理專!


當你尋求理財顧問或理專的意見(或是他們尋求你聆聽他們的意見)時,他們會給你一條「任何人都適用的」理財公式,卻和你的財務狀況完全無關。


就像你去看醫生,醫生一見到你就說:「今天我看的病人都是感冒,所以我現在就開感冒藥給你。」就這樣,你瞬間得到了感冒藥的解方,醫生已經走遠,卻還來不及說你是因為過敏來就醫。


本書會告訴你四條判斷標準,教你如何找到「真正對你好的理專」。


這是一本指引人生的書,讀過後你一輩子都會銘記在心!


理財最重要的是你要明確知道完整的目標與方向,當你遇到意外狀況時才曉得該如何處理。你可能會失去你認為很安穩的工作;你可能會承擔沒有想到的財務風險;你也可能在只有撫育一位小孩的預算下卻意外生了雙胞胎。人生無常,什麼都有可能發生。


不過,無論發生什麼事情,這本書會幫助你在現況和目標間搭起橋梁,讓你更快達到你的理財目標、人生目標。


【名家推薦】

這不是一本關於錢的書,而是一本指引人生的書。讀過後你一輩子都會銘記在心。

——賽斯.高汀(Seth Godin),《紫牛》(Purple Cow)作者


財務建議在當今的世界中,通常都被(故意)弄得很複雜而且充滿許多術語,本書作者卻用易懂且有趣的方式把財務規劃呈現給大家。最厲害的書就是內容無論是給專業人士或是門外漢閱讀都一樣輕鬆易懂,而本書就是如此。請你買兩本,一本給你自己,一本給你身邊的顧問。

——摩根.豪斯(Morgan Housel),華爾街日報( Wall Street Journal)專欄作家


很少有財務作家比本書作者更有影響力。在美國,沒人能比上理查茲做出簡化投資過程的貢獻。他的書是集結機制與智慧,使本書成為財務界的經典。在你做投資前,請先好好閱讀本書吧。

——約書亞.布朗(Joshua M. Brown),里薩茲財富管理公司(Ritholtz Wealth Management)執行長、《華爾街後台》(Backstage Wall Street) 作者


在金融界,沒人像本書作者表達能力如此超群,從書中就可以窺見。如果你懷疑財務計劃是否可以真的縮減成一頁,我建議你閱讀本書並按照理查茲的建議試試看。我敢說你會像我一樣,閱讀本書及製作財務報表的時間絕對會讓你有所回報。

——提姆.毛雷爾(Tim Maurer),白金漢資產管理公司(Buckingham Asset Management)財富顧問、《富比士》(Forbes)雜誌撰稿人


對你的財務狀況感到灰心嗎?現在就閱讀本書吧!這本書會幫助你釐清最想要的目標,讓你清楚知道自己現在的財務定位,並且提供要達到目標該採取的行動,讓你縮短達到目標的距離。

——米妮夏.沙克(Manisha Thakor),白金漢資產管理公司以及BAM聯盟(BAM ALLIANCE)婦女財務策略總監


出版社 商周出版(城邦)

Whenever I tell people about my job as a financial advisor, the conversation inevitably turns to how hopeless they feel when it comes to dealing with money. More than once, they've begged, “Just tell me what to do.” It's no surprise that even my most successful friends feel confused or paralyzed. Even if they have a shelfful of personal finance books, they don't have time to make sense of all the information available. They don't just want good advice, they want the best advice-so rather than do the “wrong thing,” they do nothing. Their 401(k) and bank statements pile up, unexamined or maybe even unopened. What they don't realize is that bad calls about money aren't failures; they're just what happens when emotional creatures have to make decisions about the future with limited information. What I tell them is that we need to scrap striving for perfection and instead commit to a process of guessing and making adjustments when things go off track. Of course we're going to make the best guesses we can-but we're not going to obsess over getting them exactly right. The fact is, in a single page you can prioritize what you really want in life and figure out how to get there. That's because a great financial plan has nothing to do with what the markets are doing, what your real estate agent is pitching, or the hot stock your brother-in-law told you about. It has everything to do with what's most important to you. By now you may be wondering, “What about the details? How much do I need to invest each year, and how do I allocate it? How much life insurance do I need?” Don't worry: I'll cover those topics and many more, sharing strategies that will take the complexity out of them. The most important thing is getting clarity about the big picture so you can cope with the unexpected. Maybe you'll lose the job you thought was secure; you'll take a financial risk that doesn't pan out; you'll have twins when you were only budgeting for one. In other words: Life will happen. But no matter what happens, this audiobook will help you bridge the gap between where you are now and where you want to go.
"It's not that we're dumb. We're wired to avoid pain and pursue pleasure and security. It feels right to sell when everyone around us is scared and buy when everyone feels great. It may feel right-but it's not rational." -From The Behavior Gap Why do we lose money? It's easy to blame the economy or the financial markets-but the real trouble lies in the decisions we make. As a financial planner, Carl Richards grew frustrated watching people he cared about make the same mistakes over and over. They were letting emotion get in the way of smart financial decisions. He named this phenomenon-the distance between what we should do and what we actually do-"the behavior gap." Using simple drawings to explain the gap, he found that once people understood it, they started doing much better. Richards's way with words and images has attracted a loyal following to his blog posts for The New York Times, appearances on National Public Radio, and his columns and lectures. His audiobook will teach you how to rethink all kinds of situations where your perfectly natural instincts (for safety or success) can cost you money and peace of mind. He'll help you to: avoid the tendency to buy high and sell low avoid the pitfalls of generic financial advice invest all of your assets-time and energy as well as savings-more wisely quit spending money and time on things that don't matter identify your real financial goals start meaningful conversations about money simplify your financial life stop losing money! It's never too late to make a fresh financial start. As Richards writes: "We've all made mistakes, but now it's time to give yourself permission to review those mistakes, identify your personal behavior gaps, and make a plan to avoid them in the future. The goal isn't to make the 'perfect' decision about money every time, but to do the best we can and move forward. Most of the time, that's enough."
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