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Bred for loyalty, strength and endurance, the easy-going and sociable Siberian Husky is a very pure and ancient breed, dating back 4,000 years or more. First bred by the Chukchis, a semi-nomadic people of northeastern Siberia, to hunt reindeer and pull sleds, the Siberian is an active breed that loves the outdoors. Prized for their great beauty, intelligence, wonderful way with children and lack of “dog smell,” they are also more free-spirited (and free-ranging) than many other popular breeds, and have a reputation for stubbornness and relentlessness in pursuit of a goal.

Is this breed right for you and your family? Siberian Huskies For Dummies answers this and all your questions about getting, caring for and living with a Husky. Siberian devotee—she has eight of her own—Diane Morgan gets you up and running with what you need to know to:

Find and deal with reputable breeders Choose the right Husky for you Hou sebreak and socialize your new puppy Educate yourself and your dog Handle behavioral problems Participate in competitions

In friendly, down-to-earth language, Diane provides insights into the Siberian Husky temperament and loads of sensible, easy-to-follow advice on everything a Husky owner should know—along with fun facts and Husky trivia, amusing and informative anecdotes, and tips on how to have a great time with your Husky. Topics covered include:

Understanding what makes the Siberian different from every other breed Deciding whether a male or female is right for you Understanding how to communicate with your Siberian Husky Training your Siberian Husky Grooming your Siberian Finding and establishing a good relationship with a veterinarian Breaking bad habits in your Husky Feeding and exercising your Siberian Husky Recognizing, preventing and treating common health problems Getting your Husky into sledding

The indispensable guide for you and your Siberian Husky, Siberian Huskies For Dummies is the only book you’ll need to help you have the best possible experience with this very ancient and venerable breed of dog.

The complete, dramatic story of Union Terrace Gardens has never before been told in one volume. Now, in her eleventh book on Aberdeen, Diane Morgan presents the complete history of these iconic gardens on the west side of the Denburn Valley. From the early days as the Denburn Meadows, where sheep were corralled at the time of the nearby Woolmanhill sales, to the transformation of the meadows into the Great Bleachery which played a crucial role in Aberdeen's Industrial Revolution, this site has been central to the history and development of the city. And above the meadows rose the wooded Corbie Heugh - the crow cliff - where Johnnie Cope and his redcoats were encamped in 1745, prior to their disaster at Prestonpans. By the 1860s the area was in decline and being taken over by housing when the architect and future provost, James Matthews, overcame the faintheartedness and intransigence of his fellow councillors and, from the Heugh and the meadows below, created the Union Terrace Gardens we know today. Since then, Union Terrace Gardens has survived various attempts to raise and convert it, all of which have failed, including Sir Ian Wood's City Garden Project (2008-2012), which caused immense controversy in Aberdeen. This latest dramatic episode and the bitter and divisive struggle it created is described and reviewed in full. Along with an in-depth look at the handsome architecture of Union Terrace, and at the east side of the Denburn Valley, where the fate of Archibald Simpson's Triple Kirks has been sealed, Aberdeen's Union Terrace Gardens , with its authoritative text (including a crucial chapter from Mike Shepherd), and superb photography, is both a fascinating account of this important space and an indispensable addition to the written history of the city.
This book introduces architects to a philosopher, Immanuel Kant, whose work was constantly informed by a concern for the world as an evolving whole. According to Kant, in this interconnected and dynamic world, humans should act as mutually dependent and responsible subjects. Given his future-oriented and ethico-politically concerned thinking, Kant is a thinker who clearly speaks to architects. This introduction demonstrates how his ideas bear pertinently and creatively upon the world in which we live now and for which we should care thoughtfully.

Kant grounded his enlightened vision of philosophy’s mission using an architectural metaphor: of the modest 'dwelling-house'. Far from constructing speculative 'castles in the sky' or vertiginous 'towers which reach to the heavens', he tells us that his humble aim is rather to build a 'secure home for ourselves', one which appropriately corresponds at once to the limited material resources available on our planet, and to our need for firm and solid principles to live by. This book also explores Kant's notions of cosmopolitics, which attempts to think politics from a global perspective by taking into account the geographical fact that the earth is a sphere with limited land mass and natural resources. Given the urgent topicality of sustainable development, these Kantian texts are of particular interest for architects of today.

Students of architecture, who are necessarily trained in negotiating between theory and practice, gain much from considering Kant, whose critical project also consisted of testing and exploring the viability of ideas, so as to ascertain to what extent, and crucially, how ideas can have a constructive effect on the whole world, and on us as active agents therein.

The snake is one of humankind's most powerful and ambiguous symbols: it has at various times represented immortality and death, male and female, deity and demon, circle and line, killer and healer, the highest wisdom and the deepest subconscious. By virtue of its mysterious movement, potent poison, fearful grip, unblinking gaze and lightning quick strike, the power and image of the snake has wound its way into every culture. Whether snakes are worshipped as gods, feared as devils, or handled in religious ceremonies to test faith, snakes have played a critical role in the human heritage. This book explores the cult of the snake in world history, religion, and folklore.

Fascination with snakes has been around since the dawn of time. Even today, images of snakes attract attention, fear, disgust, or admiration. Morgan examines that obsession with this mysterious creature, covering in vivid details such topics as mythical snakes like the Plumed Serpent, serpent iconography, tall tales, as well as the psychological symbolism that has attached itself to snakes. Cultures as diverse as pre-Columbian America, India, Egypt, China, sub-Saharan Africa, Celtic Europe, and the United States have all accorded the serpent a special place in their culture--apparently regardless of whether or not real snakes play an important part in the life of the people. Here, the mysterious nature of the snake unfolds, enchanting readers with a colorful and lively discussion of its place in our history, stories, religions, and cultures.

The snake is one of humankind's most powerful and ambiguous symbols: it has at various times represented immortality and death, male and female, deity and demon, circle and line, killer and healer, the highest wisdom and the deepest subconscious. By virtue of its mysterious movement, potent poison, fearful grip, unblinking gaze and lightning quick strike, the power and image of the snake has wound its way into every culture. Whether snakes are worshipped as gods, feared as devils, or handled in religious ceremonies to test faith, snakes have played a critical role in the human heritage. This book explores the cult of the snake in world history, religion, and folklore.

Fascination with snakes has been around since the dawn of time. Even today, images of snakes attract attention, fear, disgust, or admiration. Morgan examines that obsession with this mysterious creature, covering in vivid details such topics as mythical snakes like the Plumed Serpent, serpent iconography, tall tales, as well as the psychological symbolism that has attached itself to snakes. Cultures as diverse as pre-Columbian America, India, Egypt, China, sub-Saharan Africa, Celtic Europe, and the United States have all accorded the serpent a special place in their culture—apparently regardless of whether or not real snakes play an important part in the life of the people. Here, the mysterious nature of the snake unfolds, enchanting readers with a colorful and lively discussion of its place in our history, stories, religions, and cultures.

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