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Is #Adult #Education Broken? #DianeShaweAuthor explores the main failings in education for an economy—powered by #technology, fueled by #information, driven by #knowledge and becoming #automated affecting the poor.

As Isaac Asimov—a master of science fiction literature—once said:
"No sensible decision can be made any longer without taking into account not only the world as it is but the world as it will be."

What has happened? Why have these large institutions priced education out of some fundamental principles?

How can we make the new economic age enhance, rather than diminish, our quality of learning? How can we make this amazing innovation advance the prospects of all people especially those with experience and not just for the youth?
It is clear that at this moment most educational systems are not keeping pace with changing technology and the ever-evolving world of work.

Not enough people are thinking strategically enough in this area. Fundamentally, we need to change what people learn, how people learn, when people learn, and even why people learn.

We must get beyond the traditional model of students sitting passively in classrooms, following instructions and memorising material that they are tested and scored on which sometimes turn out to be of little use in an every changing economy. It is evident that computers can do that for us!
There has always been a great deal of lip service given to the idea of learning by doing, but not much has been done about it. In fact, John Dewey remarked in 1916, in his book, Democracy, and Education:
"Why is it that, in spite of the fact that teaching by pouring in, learning by passive absorption, are universally condemned, that they are still so entrenched in practice? That education is not an affair of "telling" and being told, but an active constructive process is a principle almost as generally violated in practice as conceded in theory"

“Transformative learning in time of crisis when
Individuals face Collective Challenges”
Diane Shawe M.Ed.

I think it is imperative that this century focuses on Adult Transformation Learning by providing Training On Demand

During the last twenty years, the use of the word “crisis” seems to have increased around the world. Referring to sudden and intensely political, economic, social, psychological, cultural or environmental changes, this term emerges now more frequently in everyday vocabulary.

According to transformative learning theory, the emergence of a crisis represents a potential opportunity for personal and/ or collective transformation, grounded in the capacity of individuals and groups to revisit the perspectives through which they interpret their own experience.

Considering recent history, how does the emergence of social, economic, political, cultural, intellectual or environmental crisis manifest an opportunity, or an expression, of transformative learning?

How does the experience of individual or collective crisis affect the way one learns to critically interpret one's own experiences? an interesting observation indeed
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