Technical Drawing 101 covers topics ranging from the most basic, such as making freehand, multiview sketches of machine parts, to the advanced—creating an AutoCAD dimension style containing the style settings defined by the ASME Y14.5-2009 Dimensioning and Tolerancing standard. But unlike the massive technical drawing reference texts on the market, Technical Drawing 101 aims to present just the right mix of information and projects that can be reasonably covered by faculty, and assimilated by students, in one semester. Both mechanical and architectural projects are introduced to capture the interest of more students and to offer a broader appeal.

The authors have also created extensive video training (120 videos, 15 hours total) that is included with every copy of the book. In these videos the authors start off by getting students comfortable with the user interface and demonstrating how to use many of AutoCAD's commands and features. The videos progress to more advanced topics where the authors walk students through completing several of the projects in the book.

The CAD portion of the text incorporates drafting theory whenever possible and covers the basics of drawing setup (units, limits, and layers), the tools of the Draw, Modify, and Dimension toolbars, and the fundamentals of 3D modeling. By focusing on the fundamental building blocks of CAD, Technical Drawing 101 provides a solid foundation for students going on to learn advanced CAD concepts and techniques (paper space, viewports, xrefs, annotative scaling, etc.) in intermediate CAD courses.

In recognition of the diverse career interests of our students, Technical Drawing 101 includes projects in which students create working drawings for a mechanical assembly as well as for an architectural project. We include architectural drawing because our experience has shown that many (if not most) first-semester drafting students are interested in careers in the architectural design field, and that a traditional technical drawing text, which focuses solely on mechanical drawing projects, holds little interest for these students. The multidisciplinary approach of this text and its supporting materials are intended to broaden the appeal of the curriculum and increase student interest and, it is hoped, future enrollments.

 Technical Drawing 101 covers topics ranging from the most basic, such as making freehand, multiview sketches of machine parts, to the advanced—creating an AutoCAD dimension style containing the style settings defined by the ASME Y14.5-2009 Dimensioning and Tolerancing standard. But unlike the massive technical drawing reference texts on the market, Technical Drawing 101 aims to present just the right mix of information and projects that can be reasonably covered by faculty, and assimilated by students, in one semester. Both mechanical and architectural projects are introduced to capture the interest of more students and to offer a broader appeal.

The authors have also created extensive video training (120 videos, 15 hours total) that is included with every copy of the book. In these videos the authors start off by getting students comfortable with the user interface and demonstrating how to use many of AutoCAD's commands and features. The videos progress to more advanced topics where the authors walk students through completing several of the projects in the book.

The CAD portion of the text incorporates drafting theory whenever possible and covers the basics of drawing setup (units, limits, and layers), the tools of the Draw, Modify, and Dimension toolbars, and the fundamentals of 3D modeling. By focusing on the fundamental building blocks of CAD, Technical Drawing 101 provides a solid foundation for students going on to learn advanced CAD concepts and techniques (paper space, viewports, xrefs, annotative scaling, etc.) in intermediate CAD courses.

In recognition of the diverse career interests of our students, Technical Drawing 101 includes projects in which students create working drawings for a mechanical assembly as well as for an architectural project. We include architectural drawing because our experience has shown that many (if not most) first-semester drafting students are interested in careers in the architectural design field, and that a traditional technical drawing text, which focuses solely on mechanical drawing projects, holds little interest for these students. The multidisciplinary approach of this text and its supporting materials are intended to broaden the appeal of the curriculum and increase student interest and, it is hoped, future enrollments.

 Technical Drawing 101 covers topics ranging from the most basic, such as making freehand, multiview sketches of machine parts, to the advanced—creating an AutoCAD dimension style containing the style settings defined by the ASME Y14.5-2009 Dimensioning and Tolerancing standard. But un-like the massive technical drawing reference texts on the market, Technical Drawing 101 aims to present just the right mix of information and projects that can be reasonably covered by faculty, and assimilated by students, in one semester. Both mechanical and architectural projects are introduced to capture the interest of more students and to offer a broader appeal.

The authors have also created extensive video training (101 videos, nearly 11 hours total) that is included with every copy of the book. In these videos the authors start of by getting students comfortable with the user interface and demonstrating how to use many of AutoCAD's tools and commands. The videos progress to more advanced topics where the authors walk students through completing several of the projects in the book.

The CAD portion of the text incorporates drafting theory whenever possible and covers the basics of drawing setup (units, limits, and layers), the tools of the Draw, Modify, and Dimension toolbars, and the fundamentals of 3D modeling. By focusing on the fundamental building blocks of CAD, Technical Drawing 101 provides a solid foundation for students going on to learn advanced CAD concepts and techniques (paper space, viewports, xrefs, annotative scaling, etc.) in intermediate CAD courses.

In recognition of the diverse career interests of our students, Technical Drawing 101 includes projects in which students create working drawings for a mechanical assembly as well as for an architectural project. We include architectural drawing because our experience has shown that many (if not most) first-semester drafting students are interested in careers in the architectural design field, and that a traditional technical drawing text, which focuses solely on mechanical drawing projects, holds little interest for these students. The multidisciplinary approach of this text and its supporting materials is intended to broaden the appeal of the curriculum and increase student interest and, it is hoped, future enrollments.

 Technical Drawing 101 covers topics ranging from the most basic, such as making freehand, multiview sketches of machine parts, to the advanced—creating an AutoCAD dimension style containing the style settings defined by the ASME Y14.5-2009 Dimensioning and Tolerancing standard. But unlike the massive technical drawing reference texts on the market, Technical Drawing 101 aims to present just the right mix of information and projects that can be reasonably covered by faculty, and assimilated by students, in one semester. Both mechanical and architectural projects are introduced to capture the interest of more students and to offer a broader appeal.

The authors have also created extensive video training (120 videos, 15 hours total) that is included with every copy of the book. In these videos the authors start off by getting students comfortable with the user interface and demonstrating how to use many of AutoCAD's commands and features. The videos progress to more advanced topics where the authors walk students through completing several of the projects in the book.

The CAD portion of the text incorporates drafting theory whenever possible and covers the basics of drawing setup (units, limits, and layers), the tools of the Draw, Modify, and Dimension toolbars, and the fundamentals of 3D modeling. By focusing on the fundamental building blocks of CAD, Technical Drawing 101 provides a solid foundation for students going on to learn advanced CAD concepts and techniques (paper space, viewports, xrefs, annotative scaling, etc.) in intermediate CAD courses.

In recognition of the diverse career interests of our students, Technical Drawing 101 includes projects in which students create working drawings for a mechanical assembly as well as for an architectural project. We include architectural drawing because our experience has shown that many (if not most) first-semester drafting students are interested in careers in the architectural design field, and that a traditional technical drawing text, which focuses solely on mechanical drawing projects, holds little interest for these students. The multidisciplinary approach of this text and its supporting materials are intended to broaden the appeal of the curriculum and increase student interest and, it is hoped, future enrollments.

 Technical Drawing 101 covers topics ranging from the most basic, such as making freehand, multiview sketches of machine parts, to the advanced—creating an AutoCAD dimension style containing the style settings defined by the ASME Y14.5-2009 Dimensioning and Tolerancing standard. But unlike the massive technical drawing reference texts on the market, Technical Drawing 101 aims to present just the right mix of information and projects that can be reasonably covered by faculty, and assimilated by students, in one semester. Both mechanical and architectural projects are introduced to capture the interest of more students and to offer a broader appeal.

The authors have also created extensive video training (120 videos, 15 hours total) that is included with every copy of the book. In these videos the authors start off by getting students comfortable with the user interface and demonstrating how to use many of AutoCAD's commands and features. The videos progress to more advanced topics where the authors walk students through completing several of the projects in the book.

The CAD portion of the text incorporates drafting theory whenever possible and covers the basics of drawing setup (units, limits, and layers), the tools of the Draw, Modify, and Dimension toolbars, and the fundamentals of 3D modeling. By focusing on the fundamental building blocks of CAD, Technical Drawing 101 provides a solid foundation for students going on to learn advanced CAD concepts and techniques (paper space, viewports, xrefs, annotative scaling, etc.) in intermediate CAD courses.

In recognition of the diverse career interests of our students, Technical Drawing 101 includes projects in which students create working drawings for a mechanical assembly as well as for an architectural project. We include architectural drawing because our experience has shown that many (if not most) first-semester drafting students are interested in careers in the architectural design field, and that a traditional technical drawing text, which focuses solely on mechanical drawing projects, holds little interest for these students. The multidisciplinary approach of this text and its supporting materials are intended to broaden the appeal of the curriculum and increase student interest and, it is hoped, future enrollments.

Technical Drawing 101 covers topics ranging from the most basic, such as making freehand, multiview sketches of machine parts, to the advanced—creating an AutoCAD dimension style containing the style settings defined by the ASME Y14.5-2009 Dimensioning and Tolerancing standard. But unlike the massive technical drawing reference texts on the market, Technical Drawing 101 aims to present just the right mix of information and projects that can be reasonably covered by faculty, and assimilated by students, in one semester. Both mechanical and architectural projects are introduced to capture the interest of more students and to offer a broader appeal.


The authors have also created extensive video training (120 videos, 17 hours total) that is included with every copy of the book. In these videos the authors start off by getting students comfortable with the user interface and demonstrating how to use many of AutoCAD's commands and features. The videos progress to more advanced topics where the authors walk students through completing several of the projects in the book.


The CAD portion of the text incorporates drafting theory whenever possible and covers the basics of drawing setup (units, limits, and layers), the tools of the Draw, Modify, and Dimension toolbars, and the fundamentals of 3D modeling. By focusing on the fundamental building blocks of CAD, Technical Drawing 101 provides a solid foundation for students going on to learn advanced CAD concepts and techniques (paper space, viewports, xrefs, annotative scaling, etc.) in intermediate CAD courses.


In recognition of the diverse career interests of our students, Technical Drawing 101 includes projects in which students create working drawings for a mechanical assembly as well as for an architectural project. We include architectural drawing because our experience has shown that many (if not most) first-semester drafting students are interested in careers in the architectural design field, and that a traditional technical drawing text, which focuses solely on mechanical drawing projects, holds little interest for these students. The multidisciplinary approach of this text and its supporting materials are intended to broaden the appeal of the curriculum and increase student interest and, it is hoped, future enrollments.

Winner of the Henry Adams Prize from the Society for History in the Federal Government
A Washington Post Notable Work of Nonfiction
A Slate Best Book of 2014

The inside story of the Supreme Court decisions that brought true democracy to the United States

As chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, Earl Warren is most often remembered for landmark rulings in favor of desegregation and the rights of the accused. But Warren himself identified a lesser known group of cases—Baker v. Carr, Reynolds v. Sims, and their companions—as his most important work. J. Douglas Smith's On Democracy's Doorstep masterfully recounts the tumultuous and often overlooked events that established the principle of "one person, one vote" in the United States.

Before the Warren Court acted, American democracy was in poor order. As citizens migrated to urban areas, legislative boundaries remained the same, giving rural lawmakers from sparsely populated districts disproportionate political power—a power they often used on behalf of influential business interests. Smith shows how activists ranging from city boosters in Tennessee to the League of Women Voters worked to end malapportionment, incurring the wrath of chambers of commerce and southern segregationists as they did so. Despite a conspiracy of legislative inaction and a 1946 Supreme Court decision that instructed the judiciary not to enter the "political thicket," advocates did not lose hope. As Smith shows, they skillfully used the Fourteenth Amendment's Equal Protection Clause to argue for radical judicial intervention. Smith vividly depicts the unfolding drama as Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy pressed for change, Solicitor General Archibald Cox cautiously held back, young clerks pushed the justices toward ever-bolder reform, and the powerful Senate Minority Leader Everett Dirksen obsessively sought to reverse the judicial revolution that had upended state governments from California to Virginia.

Today, following the Court's recent controversial decisions on voting rights and campaign finance, the battles described in On Democracy's Doorstep have increasing relevance. With erudition and verve, Smith illuminates this neglected episode of American political history and confronts its profound consequences.

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