Ebooks

Most of the prefatory issues are extensively elaborated upon in the Prolegomenon, which also contains the complete references to the texts and authors discussed below. Nevertheless, the “Preface” would be grossly incomplete without touching on some of these issues, books, and scholars. Too, many of this book’s chapters (e. g. , Mora’s, Marx’s, D. B. Weiner’s) examine and “reference” important earlier, as well as contemporary, general histories of psychiatry and specialized monographs; in German, French, Italian, and Spanish. Also, in his 1968 Short History of Psychiatry, d- cussed below, Ackerknecht (pp. xi–xii) references important nineteenth and earlier-twentieth century psychiatric histories in English, French, and German. Such citations will of course not be repeated here. Finally, thanks to several publishers’re-editions of dozens of classical psychiatric texts; one can consult their bibliographies as well. See “Prolegomenon” for references to these splendid series. In a rough-and-ready sense, medical history began in classical Greece—for example, On Ancient Medicine. While traditionally included in the Hippocratic corpus, this text seems more likely to have been written by a non- or even anti-Hippocratic doctor. Moreover, the Hippocratic and other schools were hardly as secular as we now suppose. On Epilepsy, for example, does not so much declare the prevalent denotation of it as the “sacred disease” erroneous as it does that it is no more nor less sacred than any other disease.
What do the psychoanalyst and the historian have in common? This important question has stimulated a lively debate within the psychoanalytic profession in recent years, bearing as it does on the very nature of the psychoanalytic enterprise. Edwin Wallace, a clinician with training in the history and philosophy of science, brings a ranging scholarly perspective to the debate, mediating between rival perspectives and clarifying the issues at stake in the process of offering his own thoughtful conception of the historical nature of psychoanalysis. For Wallace, the procedures, problems, and interpretive possibilities of psychoanalysis and history are strikingly constant and mutually illuminating. He insists, further, that the fundamentally historical nature of psychoanalysis poses no threat to its scientific dignity.

In arriving at this verdict, Wallace pushes beyond his expansive treatment of the many parallels between history and psychoanalysis to a systematic consideration of the problem of causation in both disciplines. Tracing the historical background of causation in science, philosophy, history, and analysis, he offers a logical analysis of determinism and a critique of causal language in psychoanalysis while adumbrating the historical character of psychoanalytic explanation.

Historiography and Causation in Psychoanalysis is a thought-provoking work that cuts across disciplinary boundaries. It will cultivate the historical sensibilities of all its clinical readers, broadening and deepening the intellectual perspective they bring to the dialogue about the nature of psychoanalytic work. Timely and rewarding reading for analysts, psychiatrists, and clinical psychologists, it will be welcomed by historians and philosophers as well.

©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.