These “superbly crafted tales” showcase the World Fantasy Award–winning author’s “beautifully nuanced, often disquieting style” (Booklist).

America boasts no finer, more acclaimed or accomplished literary fantasist than Elizabeth Hand. Poetry, magic, and love intermingle as she tears down the walls that separate the mundane from faerie and fancy. In this stunning collection of eight “strange stories,” the multiple Nebula Award– and World Fantasy Award–winning author weaves spells that enrapture her readers, ranging freely from Greek mythology to the contemporary nightmares of AIDS and 9/11.

The celebrated chiller “Cleopatra Brimstone” chronicles the aftermath of a brutal rape and the bizarre transformation of a young entomology student into a vengeful angel of death. An emotionally unmoored tattoo artist discovers an unusual deck of tarot cards that enables her to profoundly alter bare skin and her personal reality in the mind-expanding masterwork “The Least Trumps.” An artist attempts to capture her wayward modern-day Odysseus in oils and otherwise; a woman tragically in love isolates herself from a catastrophe-prone world; the death of a dear friend inspires profound personal reflections and strange pagan rituals; and in the brilliant concluding story, an artifact from a lost world reveals the inescapable vulnerability of our own. Odd and touching, provocative and disturbing, the selections in this magnificent collection showcase a master of the fantastic at the very peak of her storytelling powers.
Groundbreaking, provocative novels that challenge gender assumptions—in stories of aliens and humans, women and men, and the shifting nature of identity.
 
The James Tiptree, Jr. Award was established to acknowledge works of science fiction or fantasy that expand or explore our understanding of gender. The three novels in this collection each embody that continually evolving challenge in boldly original and highly imaginative ways.
 
A Woman of the Iron People: The inaugural winner of the Tiptree Award in 1991, this “excellent, anthropologically oriented SF tale” (Publishers Weekly) examines the fear and fascination on both sides when a group of human scientists discovers an advanced yet seemingly primitive alien culture.
 
“Fascinating . . . Very wise and funny . . . Full of complicated and irresistible people, some of them human.” —Ursula K. Le Guin
 
Waking the Moon: Nebula Award–winning author Elizabeth Hand serves up a seductive, post-feminist thriller in which a college freshman accidentally discovers the existence of the Benandanti, a clandestine order devoted to suppressing the powerful Moon Goddess and secretly manipulating the world’s governments and institutions.
 
“A potent socio-erotic ghost story.” —William Gibson
 
Larque on the Wing: A middle-aged housewife’s thoughts become reality when her rebellious inner child takes control, and she transforms herself into a fearless gay man. This is a moving, funny, surprising, and transcendent tale of one woman’s unusual quest to come to terms with who she truly is.
 
“Springer effectively uses fantasy to evoke midlife soul-searching. . . . An engrossing novel about gender and self-formation.” —Publishers Weekly
“Delightful . . . A treat for dictionary hounds and vocabulary-challenged word lovers everywhere.”—Booklist

For most of us, these prizewinning spelling bee words would be difficult to pronounce, let alone spell. We asked twenty-one of today’s most talented and inventive writers to go even further and pen an original tale inspired by one of dozens of obscure and fascinating championship words. The result is Logorrhea—a veritable dictionary of the weird, the fantastic, the haunting, and the indefinable that will have you spellbound from the very first page.

Including twenty-one stories and the inscrutable words that inspired them:

Chiaroscuro: “The Chiaroscurist” by Hal Duncan
Lyceum: “Lyceum” by Liz Williams
Vivisepulture: “Vivisepulture” by David Prill
Eczema: “Eczema” by Clare Dudman
Sacrilege, Semaphore: “Semaphore” by Alex Irvine
Smaragdine: “The Smaragdine Knot” by Marly Youmans
Insouciant: “A Portrait in Ivory” by Michael Moorcock
Cambist: “The Cambist and Lord Iron: A Fairy Tale of Economics” by Daniel Abraham
Logorrhea: “Logorrhea” by Michelle Richmond
Pococurante: “Pococurante” by Anna Tambour
Autochthonous: “From Around Here” by Tim Pratt
Vignette: “Vignette” by Elizabeth Hand
Sycophant: “Plight of the Sycophant” by Alan DeNiro
Elegiacal: “The Last Elegy” by Matthew Cheney
Eudaemonic: “Eudaemonic” by Jay Caselberg
Macerate: “Softer” by Paolo Bacigalupi
Transept: “Crossing the Seven” by Jay Lake
Psoriasis: “Tsuris” by Leslie What
Euonym: “The Euonymist” by Neil Williamson
Dulcimer: “Singing of Mount Abora” by Theodora Goss
Appoggiatura: “Appoggiatura” by Jeff VanderMeer

“This book is a logophile’s dream—a left-field collection of stories inspired by winning words from the Scripps National Spelling Bee. Anyone who has ever spent an hour or two happily browsing the pages of a dictionary will find something to love here.”—Kevin Brockmeier, author of A Brief History of the Dead
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