The Third Ghost Story Megapack selects 26 more choice hauntings for your reading pleasure. Included this time are:

THE DEAD AND THE COUNTESS, by Gertrude Atherton
THE CEDAR CLOSET, by Lafcadio Hearn
THE WRAITH OF BARNJUM, by F. Anstey
THE JOLLY CORNER, by Henry James
THE ROLL-CALL OF THE REEF, by A. T. Quiller-Couch
THE BOWMEN, by Arthur Machen
OMAN, By Leopold Kompert
THE MIDDLE TOE OF THE RIGHT FOOT, by Ambrose Bierce
THE TOLL-HOUSE, by W.W. Jacobs
THE HAUNTED COVE, by Sir George Douglas
THE GHOST OF LORD CLARENCEUX, by Arnold Bennett
THE HAUNTED AUTOMATON, by W. C. Morrow
THE GHOSTS AT GRANTLEY, by Leonard Kip
THE SPECTRE COOK OF BANGLETOP, by John Kendrick Bangs
THE SUPERSTITIOUS MAN’S STORY, by Thomas Hardy
THE SPECTRE BRIDEGROOM, by William Hunt
THE SPECTRE IN THE CART, by Thomas Nelson Page
THE TALE OF THE PORCELAIN-GOD, by Lafcadio Hearn
THE BELL IN THE FOG, by Gertrude Atherton
THE HAUNTING OF WHITE GATES, by G. M. Robins
THE SHADOW ON THE BLIND, by Mrs. Alfred (Louisa) Baldwin
NO. 5 BRANCH LINE: THE ENGINEER, by Amelia Ann Blanford Edwards
THE SHADOW IN THE CORNER, by Mary Elizabeth Braddon
THE SECRET CHAMBER, by Margaret Oliphant
THE UPPER BERTH, by F. Marion Crawford
MR. GRAY'S STRANGE STORY, by Louisa Murray

And don't forget to search this ebook store for "Wildside Megapack" for more entries in this and other series, covering everything from science fiction and fantasy to classic literature and pulp fiction, from mysteries and westerns to children's literature -- and much, much more!

The Fifth Ghost Story MEGAPACKTM presents a great collection of 25 more classic ghost stories from 19th and 20th century masters (plus a new introduction by editor Shawn M. Garrett). Included are:

A TALE OF A GAS-LIT GHOST, by Anonymous
DOG OR DEMON? by Theo Gift
THE STORY OF MEDHANS LEA, by E. Heron & H. Heron
HOW FEAR DEPARTED FROM THE LONG GALLERY, by E. F. Benson
ON THE BRIGHTON ROAD, by Richard Middleton
THE NEW PASS, by Amelia B. Edwards
THE VIOLET CAR, by E. Nesbit
KENTUCKY'S GHOST, by Elizabeth Stuart Phelps Ward
THE SHIP THAT SAW A GHOST, by Frank Norris
CHRISTMAS EVE ON A HAUNTED HULK, by Frank Cowper
YUKI-ONNA, by Lafcadio Hearn
THE ADVENTURE OF THE GERMAN STUDENT, by Washington Irving
FULLCIRCLE, by John Buchan
THE GHOST IN THE CAP’N BROWN HOUSE, by Harriet Beecher Stowe
THE STRANGER, by Ambrose Bierce
THE SOUTHWEST CHAMBER, by Mary E. Wilkins Freeman
THE READJUSTMENT, by Mary Austin
EVELINE’S VISITANT, by Mary Elizabeth Braddon
SIR EDMUND ORME, by Henry James
THE HAUNTED DRAGOON, by Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch
THE PICTURE ON THE WALL, by Katharine Tynan
THE BANSHEE'S WARNING, by Charlotte Riddell
THE SERPENT'S HEAD, by Lady Dilke
THE DEAD MAN OF VARLEY GRANGE, by Anonymous
THE SCREAMING SKULL, by F. Marion Crawford

If you enjoy this book, search your favorite ebook store for "Wildside Press Megapack" to see the more than 180 other entries in the series, covering science fiction, modern authors, mysteries, westerns, classics, adventure stories, and much, much more!

Presenting our best ever and biggest ever collection of hand-picked Christmas classics for a wonderful holiday enjoyment. Our editions are meticulously crafted to give the absolute reading pleasure and that happy festive smile. So, what are you waiting for? Just come along... Life and Adventures of Santa Claus (L. Frank Baum) Christmas-Tree Land (Mary Louisa Molesworth) The Little City of Hope (F. Marion Crawford) Peter Pan and Wendy (J. M. Barrie) Little Women (Louisa May Alcott) The Wonderful Wizard of OZ (L. Frank Baum) Little Lord Fauntleroy (Frances Hodgson Burnett) Christmas with Grandma Elsie (Martha Finley) Anne of Green Gables (Lucy Maud Montgomery) The Christmas Angel (Abbie Farwell Brown) At the Back of the North Wind (George MacDonald) Black Beauty (Anna Sewell) The Christmas Child (Hesba Stretton) Granny's Wonderful Chair (Frances Browne) The Romance of a Christmas Card (Kate Douglas Wiggin) Wind in the Willows (Kenneth Grahame) The Birds' Christmas Carol (Kate Douglas Wiggin) The Wonderful Life - Story of the life and death of our Lord (Hesba Stretton) Oliver Twist (Charles Dickens) Happy Hearts (June Isle) The Doctor's Christmas Eve (James Lane Allen) Pollyanna (Eleanor H. Porter) Pollyanna Grows Up (Eleanor H. Porter) Children of the Tenements (Jacob A. Riis) Little Prudy's Sister Susy (Sophie May) Little Peter: A Christmas Morality (Lucas Malet) Snap-Dragons or, Old Father Christmas (Juliana Horatia Ewing) Christmas Holidays at Merryvale (Alice Hale Burnett) The Ice Queen (Ernest Ingersoll) Miss Santa Claus of the Pullman (Annie F. Johnston) The Old Woman Who Lived in a Shoe (Amanda M. Douglas) Little Maid Marian (Amy Ella Blanchard) The Tailor of Gloucester (Beatrix Potter) Santa Claus's Partner (Thomas Nelson Page) The Upas Tree (Florence L. Barclay) A Versailles Christmas-Tide (A. S. Boyd) At the Black Rocks (Edward A. Rand) The Man Who Forgot Christmas (Max Brand)
A late nineteenth century American author, F. Marion Crawford was a prolific novelist and noted writer of classic weird and fantastic stories. Crawford objected to the prevailing taste for realistic fiction and preferred to write gripping romance fiction. His novels are noted for vivid characterisations and their versatile and colourful depictions of European settings. Many of his works are set in Italy, the country he made his long-time home. His most celebrated achievement is the ‘Saracinesca’ trilogy of novels, which explores the effect of recent social changes on the aristocracy at a time when its influence and status were under attack from the emerging forces of modernity. For the first time in publishing history, this edition presents Crawford’s complete fictional works, with numerous illustrations, rare texts, informative introductions and the usual Delphi bonus material. (Version 1)


* Beautifully illustrated with images relating to Crawford’s life and works

* Concise introductions to the novels and other texts

* All 44 novels, with individual contents tables

* Special ‘Saracinesca Series’ contents table to help navigate the novels

* Rare novels appearing for the first time in digital publishing, including ‘With the Immortals’ and Crawford’s last novel, ‘The Undesirable Governess’

* Images of how the books were first published, giving your eReader a taste of the original texts

* Excellent formatting of the texts

* Includes Crawford’s non-fiction works, including his detailed history and travel books

* Scholarly ordering of texts into chronological order and genres


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CONTENTS:


The Saracinesca Series


The Novels

Mr. Isaacs

Doctor Claudius

To Leeward

A Roman Singer

An American Politician

Zoroaster

A Tale of a Lonely Parish

Saracinesca

Marzio’s Crucifix

Paul Patoff

With the Immortals

Greifenstein

Sant’ Ilario

A Cigarette-Maker’s Romance

Khaled

The Witch of Prague

The Three Fates

Don Orsino

The Children of the King

Pietro Ghisleri

Marion Darche

Katharine Lauderdale

Love in Idleness

The Ralstons

Casa Braccio

Adam Johnstone’s Son

Taquisara

A Rose of Yesterday

Corleone

Via Crucis

In the Palace of the King

Marietta

Cecilia

The Heart of Rome

Whosoever Shall Offend

Soprano

A Lady of Rome

Arethusa

The Little City of Hope

The Primadonna

The Diva’s Ruby

The White Sister

Stradella

The Undesirable Governess


The Shorter Fiction

Wandering Ghosts

The King’s Messenger


The Non-Fiction

Our Silver

The Novel: What It Is

Constantinople

Bar Harbor

Ave Roma Immortalis

Rulers of the South


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Example in this ebook
CHAPTER IMaria Montalto was dressed as a Neapolitan Acquaiola and kept the lemonade stall at the Kermess in Villa Borghese. The villa has lately changed its official name, and not for the first time in its history, but it will take as long to accustom Romans to speak of it as Villa Umberto as it once did before they could give up calling it Villa Cenci. For the modern Romans are conservative people, who look with contempt or indifference on the changes of nomenclature which are imposed from time to time by their municipal representatives.
The lady was selling iced lemonade, syrup of almonds, and tamarind to the smart and the vulgar, the just and the unjust alike; and her dress consisted of a crimson silk skirt embroidered with gold lace, a close-fitting low bodice that matched it more or less and confined the fine linen she wore, which was a little open at the throat and was picked up with red ribband at the elbows, besides being embroidered in the old-fashioned Neapolitan way. She had a handsome string of pink corals round her neck, Sicilian gold earrings hung at her ears, and a crimson silk handkerchief was tied over her dark hair with a knot behind her head.
She was very good-looking, and every one said the costume was becoming to her; and as she was not at all vain, she enjoyed her little success of prettiness very much. After all, she was barely seven-and-twenty and had a right to look five years younger in a fancy dress. She was not really a widow, though many of her friends had fallen into the habit of treating her as if she were. It was seven years since Montalto had left her and had gone to live with his mother in Spain.
They had only lived together two years when he had gone away, and observant people said that Maria had not grown a day older since, whereas they had noticed a very great change in her appearance soon after she had been married. It was quite absurd that at twenty she should have had a little patch of grey by her left temple just where the dark hair waved naturally. At that rate we should all be old at thirty.
The observant ones had noticed another odd thing about Maria Montalto. Her girl friends remembered especially a certain fearless look in her eyes, which were not black, though they were almost too dark to be called brown, and used to be most wonderfully full of warm light in her girlhood. But she had not been married many months, perhaps not many weeks, when a great change had come into them, and instead of fearlessness her friends had seen the very opposite in them, a look of continual terror, a haunted look, the look of a woman who lives in perpetual dread of a terrible catastrophe. It had been there before her boy was born, and it was there afterwards; later she had been ill for some time, after which Montalto had gone away, and since that day her eyes had changed again.
There was no terror in them now, but there was the perpetual remembrance of something that had hurt very much. I once knew a man who had been tortured by savages for twenty-four hours, and his eyes had that same expression ever afterwards. In the Middle Ages, when torture was the common instrument of the law, many persons must have gone about with that memory of suffering in their eyes, plain for every one to see. Maria looked as if she had undergone bodily torture, which she remembered, but no longer feared.
After all, her trouble had left no lines in her young features, nor anything but that singular expression of her eyes and that tiny patch of white in her hair. Her face was rather pale, but with that delicious warm pallor which often goes with perfect health in dark people of the more refined type, and the crimson kerchief certainly set it off very well, as the corals did, too, and the queer little Sicilian earrings.
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