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 This handbook provides reliable guidance on what to do next and offers practical, no-frills advice about what to do to counter the day-to-day challenges and outright calamities that make up the first-line leader’s work life.  Perhaps even more important, it offers time-proven recommendations on how to prevent a bothersome situation from escalating into crisis proportions in the first place. It will prove equally useful to the veteran, novice or future law enforcement supervisor. Its sound advice will help him retain his emotional as well as physical and moral health in a real-world environment that seems to become more challenging every day.  It will help him to lead and bring his people to share his practices and beliefs in doing a very critical job the right way. Just as it should be, the handbook is short on theory and long on “how to” advice.  It is literally a resource that the supervisor can tuck into an equipment bag or otherwise keep close at hand. It likewise will aid him in carrying out the very practical tasks of communicating effectively; evaluating employee performance, correcting inappropriate behavior and helping his officers survive both on the street and in the police organization. Meanwhile, the handbook will assist the law enforcement leader in working well with his own boss and planning his own career. There is no job description in the world quite like that of first-line law enforcement boss.  The job is as unique as it is difficult and vital to the success of any successful police organization.  This book will help them become even better at their very important job.
Revised, updated, and expanded, this practical hands-on book is packed full of step-by-step guidelines and suggestions for carrying out a multitude of leadership tasks and responsibilities focused on  a changing work force that serves an equally changing and complex society. While emphasizing the real value of common sense in good leadership practices, the author furnishes the aspiring novice or veteran police supervisor with specific advice on how to train, counsel, inspect, discipline, and assess the performance of his or her subordinates. He strives to help the supervisor with the vital obligations of being a planner, a problem resolution officer, and effective communicator within as well as outside the law enforcement organization. Major topics include: (1) what supervision means and what you need to know; (2) supervisory ethics, professional responsibilities as a teacher, inspector, advocate, and role model; (3) the key qualities of true leadership; (4) the vital job as an evaluator of employee performance, discipline in the correction process, oral and written communication skills; (5) the skills needed when dealing with the news media; (6) assistance in planning a career as a first-line leader in supervision; (7) the skills necessary for effective counseling; (8) managing external and internal complaints; (9) an effective role in community policing and customer service; and (10) effective leadership of different generations. Each chapter concludes with a brief “Points to Remember” that provides a quickly-read and easily remembered checklist of the chapter’s salient points. The sixth edition furnishes many more practical, helpful, and real-life examples pertaining to leadership issues. It offers  a realistic approach to the challenging task of providing strong, effective leadership  to front-line employees in a dynamic, demanding profession.
 In this exceptional new third edition, the author has retained much of the practical "everyone goes home" approach as in previous editions, but adds depth and potentially lifesaving information to keep the police officer safe and secure. The book provides a general orientation for survival, and details the specifics the intelligent police professional must master in order to survive the many types of risky situations he will be exposed to over a career. The book is painstakingly thorough in its approach to officer survival in an era where peacekeepers are required to be highly transparent and accountable in all of their actions. Every use of force by a law enforcement officer will be closely scrutinized. This is one reason why it is important that today's officer has access to every viable tactic and technique that may prevent the need for force in the first place. The book details everything from searching an arrested individual to searching a building; arresting a 300-pound outlaw biker to a surly teenager. Techniques and strategies discussed in the book include personal preparation for risk reduction, vehicle stops and contacts, defusing disturbances, domestic violence, burglaries and structure searches, barricades and hostage-takers, vehicle pursuits, ambush attacks, emotionally disturbed and mentally ill persons, prisoner control and transport, terrorist threats, off-duty confrontations, and reducing the emotional risks involved. At the end of each vital chapter, a quick and concise "Risk Reduction Checklist" is presented. These chapter summaries are excellent for review and merit rereading by the police professional intent on surviving to a healthy retirement. An Appendix has been included containing informative accounts of police deaths, culled from the "Law Enforcement Officers Killed and Assaulted Report" put together by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Other accounts are also found at the end of each chapter. Each one makes a point by way of grim example, yet every tragedy described can help save the life of an alert police officer who might otherwise become one more statistic. This unique and comprehensive text will be invaluable to all law enforcement professionals, investigators, policymakers, and police academics.
This book provides a general orientation for survival, using the author’s “everyone goes home” approach as in previous editions, to keep the police officer safe and secure. It details the specifics the intelligent police professional must master in order to survive the many types of risky situations he will be exposed to over a career. The book is painstakingly thorough in its approach to officer survival in an era where peacekeepers are required to be highly transparent and accountable in all their actions. Every use of force by a law enforcement officer will be closely scrutinized. This is one reason why it is important that today’s officer has access to every viable tactic and technique that may prevent the need for force in the first place. The book details everything from searching an arrested individual to searching a building; arresting a 300-pound outlaw biker to a surly teenager. Techniques and strategies discussed in the book include personal preparation for risk reduction, vehicle stops and contacts, defusing disturbances, domestic violence, burglaries and structure searching, barricades and hostage-takers, vehicle pursuits, ambush attacks, emotionally disturbed and mentally ill persons, prisoner control and transport, terrorist threats, off-duty confrontations, and reducing the emotional risks involved. At the end of each vital chapter, a quick and concise “Risk Reduction Checklist” is presented. These chapter summaries are excellent for review and merit rereading by the police professional intent on surviving to a healthy retirement. An Appendix has been included containing informative accounts of police deaths, culled from the “Law Enforcement Officers Killed and Assaulted Report” put together by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Other accounts are also found at the end of each chapter. Each one makes a point by way of grim example, yet every tragedy described can help save the life of an alert police officer who might otherwise become one more statistic. This unique and comprehensive text will be invaluable to all law enforcement professionals, investigators, policymakers, and police academics.
 The purpose of this book is to provide the first-line leader with practical, time-proven guidance for making decisions that range from the seemingly mundane to the life-critical. The text emphasizes the importance of common sense applied to sound decision-making, and provides the first-line leader with the insight, experience, talents, and skills to meet specific challenges. The following topics are featured: why decision-making is important; assessing your people; employee grievances and fair decisions; setting a good example; making decisions concerning employee performance; disciplinary decision-making; troubled employees and compassionate decision-making; identifying high-risk behavior; keeping your officers alive; tactical decision-making; decision-making in critical incidents; handling media encounters; how to fix communication breakdowns; surviving the difficult boss and what your supervisor expects; surviving an organization's politics; making decisions when unsure of yourself; and making career plans. The embodiment of the text lies in its ability to involve the reader in tasks that must be accomplished following the use of lethal force by an officer, the leader's key duties and responsibilities to citizenry and his organization, responding effectively to high-risk, on the street scenarios, while simultaneously maintaining true professional calm and even-handedness. This book will be useful as a learning tool for those interested in preparing themselves for law enforcement supervisory or management positions, policymakers, and police academies.  
This book provides time- and experience-proven advice for responding safely and effectively to threats to a law enforcement officerfs safety. It relies on law enforcementfs bloody history to reveal what has gone wrong for a very long time — and how to fix it so that no more cops die needlessly. This book identifies the cop killers and the fatal errors that cops make, and it explores how these incidents happen and why.  Most important of all, the book goes into detail about how to prevent these terminal errors and furnishes to-the-point advice for avoiding them. These tactics and techniques work. It offers the same common sense advice that solid patrol sergeants have been sharing with their briefing room charges for a long while. It has been assembled by a police chief who spent 15 years as a sergeant. WHY COPS DIE can be used in a lot of ways, all of them useful for drastically reducing the number of officers who die on the job every year.  It should be issued to every law enforcement academy recruit. It is aimed across the spectrum of the law enforcement organization from the rookie to the first-line supervisor to the command staff.  Chiefs and sheriffs will find it of value, as will those directly responsible for the training of law enforcement officers.  By applying practical, potentially lifesaving advice to their daily duties law enforcementfs first-line practitioners can sharply reduce the number of peacekeepers who die or are maimed in the future. That effort begins here.
Whether you are just pondering if you should go for the gold or are already radar-locked on getting there, this book, MAKING SERGEANT, is for you. Written by a veteran police chief with over 50 years of law enforcement experience, 15 of them spent as a sergeant, it contains practical advice for (1) deciding on whether you are ready for the job and (2) getting it and succeeding at it if you are. Short on theory and long on pragmatic advice, the text also will help the already-promoted supervisor successfully meet the challenges of this complex but vital position. As most law enforcement agency CEOs will acknowledge, first-line supervisor or sergeant is often the single most important position in the police organization. Without the best efforts of the highly competent man or woman wearing the stripes, the organization is destined to flounder in relative ineffectiveness. In the worst-case scenario, the agency may fail. In other words, the sergeant has got to get it right. This book will help you decide if you want to be that sergeant. If you do, it will help you be him or her. If, at least at this stage of your career, you decide that the answer is no, that’s fine, too. There is not a law enforcement agency anywhere that has enough talented first-line officers. Your goals may change later. But if you choose to go for it, the tips contained in this book will help you get there. If you are already a supervisor, MAKING SERGEANT will help you get better at what you are already doing.
To one extent or another, dealing with the news media is a fact of life for every American law enforcement leader. However, news organizations, although a pain at times, can aid law enforcement in a number of ways. This text avoids theory and the intangible and concentrates on the practicalities by exploring past troubled times and focuses on what cops and reporters have to offer each other. The “news” is defined and broken down into some of its technical, component parts. The secrets for establishing a mutually beneficial relationship with reporters are revealed, including the absolute necessity for credibility on the part of the law enforcement leader. Common sense policies and procedures concerning relations with the news media, and the importance of an effective Public Information Officer (PIO) is explored. The following topics are featured: newspaper journalism; the all-seeing eye called television; a look at what radio has to offer; Internet news; and what the Net can provide the police officer in twenty-first century America. The law enforcement officer will learn how to give an effective interview, produce news releases that will be used by the media, the art of leading a successful news conference, and the dirty tricks used by the occasional, unscrupulous journalist. Solid advice for overcoming this media misbehavior is given, which will prepare the leader for dealing with the media challenges found at the scene of a major crime, disaster, or other high-profile incident. Instructions for the responses required to recover from an episode of bad news is included, aiding the leader in how to inform the public of all good news that the agency generates. Each chapter concludes with a summary of vital points to remember, and a glossary of terms appears at the end of the text. A new chapter has been added on the topic of “fake news.” Law enforcement leaders need to understand what this phenomenon is and how to protect themselves from its negative effects. This how-to-do-it book is a troubleshooting guide that will enable the law enforcement leader to undertake any challenging media situation that is encountered.
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