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Lack of knowledge about immigrant and minority students’ learning outside school has contributed to the difficulties educators encounter when trying to embrace cultural diversity. Many educators do not have the knowledge base about immigrant and minority children’s culturallyspecific ways of learning in nonschool settings. Given the changing cultural landscapes in today’s schools, we have an imperative to develop more situated understandings of immigrant and minority children’s literacy learning experiences embedded in the social and cultural fabrics of their everyday lives outside school. This volume of research meets this important need in the field. It not only focuses on the complexity of literacy learning in diverse home contexts, but also examines how literacy is practiced and lived in multiple ways within families of various backgrounds including those of Asian, African and AfricanAmerican, Hispanic, White European and mixed heritages. In addition, it explores how these various culturally embedded home practices will inform school education and policy making in a larger sociopolitical context. The book makes an original and significant contribution to the fields of literacy education and school, home, and community partnerships. Since immigrant and minority families’ literacy activities and the cultural contexts of their practices at home are not readily accessible to school personnel, program developers, policy makers or even researchers and educators, this book will serve as an important resource for teachers, practitioners, undergraduate and graduate students, teacher educators, and university researchers who are in the fields of literacy education, family literacy and new literacy studies, minority and/or immigrant education, and second language education.
No less than other minorities, Asian women scholars are confronted with racial discrimination and stereotyping as well as disrespect for their research, teaching, and leadership, and are underrepresented in academia.

In the face of such barriers, many Asian female scholars have developed strategies to survive and thrive. This book is among the first to examine their lived experience in Western academic discourses. It addresses the socio-cultural, political, academic, and personal issues that Asian female scholars encounter in higher education.

The contributors to this book include first- and second-generation immigrants who are teachers and researchers in higher education and who come from a wide range of Asian nations and backgrounds. They here combine new research and personal narratives to explore the intersecting layers of relationships that impact their lives--language, culture, academic discourses, gender, class, generation, and race. The book is replete with the richness and complexity of these scholars' struggles and triumphs in their professional and personal realms.

This powerful and engaging volume:
* Examines and celebrates the struggles and triumphs that Asian female scholars experience as they try to "make it" in academic environments that may differ sharply from the culture of their countries of origin;
* Highlights the unique contributions the authors have made to research, theory, and the profession;
* Establishes the authors' claim to visibility and a voice for themselves and more generally for Asian women in the academy;
* Opens a dialogue on these critical issues by sharing the academic and personal experiences of senior and junior scholars alike; and
* Contributes to the on-going discussion on issues pertinent to the status of minority female scholars in higher education.
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