This comprehensive eBook presents the complete fictional works of Henry Fielding, with numerous illustrations, informative introductions and the usual Delphi bonus material. (Version 1)

* Beautifully illustrated with images relating to Fielding's life and works
* Concise introductions to the novels and other texts
* ALL the novels, with individual contents tables
* Images of how the books were first printed, giving your eReader a taste of the original texts
* The complete 26 extant plays, for the first time in digital publishing history
* Excellent formatting of the texts
* Famous works such as TOM JONES are illustrated with their original artwork
* Special chronological and alphabetical contents tables for the poetry
* Includes a thorough selection of Fielding's non-fiction
* Features two biographies, including Sir Walter's Scott's scarce study of the author's life - explore Fielding's literary world
* Scholarly ordering of texts into chronological order and literary genres

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Contents:

The Novels
An Apology for the Life of Mrs Shamela Andrews
The History of the Adventures of Joseph Andrews
The Life of Mr Jonathan Wild the Great.
The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling
The History of Amelia

The Plays
Love in Several Masques
The Temple Beau
The Author's Farce; And the Pleasures of the Town
Tom Thumb: A Tragedy
Rape Upon Rape
The Letter-Writers
The Grub Street Opera
The Lottery
The Modern Husband
The Covent-Garden Tragedy
The Old Debauchees
The Mock Doctor
The Miser
The Intriguing Chambermaid
Don Quixote in England
An Old Man Taught Wisdom
The Universal Gallant, or the Different Husbands
Pasquin, a Dramatick Satire on the Times
Tumble-down Dick
Eurydice, a Farce
The Historical Register for the Year 1736
Eurydice Hiss'd
Miss Lucy in Town
Plutus, the God of Riches
The Wedding-Day
The Fathers, or the Good-Natur'd Man

The Poems
List of Poems in Chronological Order
List of Poems in Alphabetical Order

The Non-Fiction
The Journal of a Voyage to Lisbon
A Journey from This World to the Next
An Essay on Conversation.
An Essay on the Knowledge of the Characters of Men
An Essay on Nothing
The Opposition: A Vision
The True Patriot
A Selection from the Covent-Garden Journal
The Female Husband
Familiar Letters.

The Biographies
The Life of Henry Fielding by Sir Walter Scott
Fielding by Austin Dobson

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Notwithstanding your constant refusal, when I have asked leave to prefix your name to this dedication, I must still insist on my right to desire your protection of this work.

To you, Sir, it is owing that this history was ever begun. It was by your desire that I first thought of such a composition. So many years have since past, that you may have, perhaps, forgotten this circumstance: but your desires are to me in the nature of commands; and the impression of them is never to be erased from my memory.

Again, Sir, without your assistance this history had never been completed. Be not startled at the assertion. I do not intend to draw on you the suspicion of being a romance writer. I mean no more than that I partly owe to you my existence during great part of the time which I have employed in composing it: another matter which it may be necessary to remind you of; since there are certain actions of which you are apt to be extremely forgetful; but of these I hope I shall always have a better memory than yourself.

Lastly, It is owing to you that the history appears what it now is. If there be in this work, as some have been pleased to say, a stronger picture of a truly benevolent mind than is to be found in any other, who that knows you, and a particular acquaintance of yours, will doubt whence that benevolence hath been copied? The world will not, I believe, make me the compliment of thinking I took it from myself. I care not: this they shall own, that the two persons from whom I have taken it, that is to say, two of the best and worthiest men in the world, are strongly and zealously my friends. I might be contented with this, and yet my vanity will add a third to the number; and him one of the greatest and noblest, not only in his rank, but in every public and private virtue. But here, whilst my gratitude for the princely benefactions of the Duke of Bedford bursts from my heart, you must forgive my reminding you that it was you who first recommended me to the notice of my benefactor.

 Herewith I transmit you a Copy of sweet, dear, pretty Pamela, a little Book which this Winter hath produced, of which, I make no doubt, you have already heard mention from some of your Neighbouring Clergy; for we have made it our common Business here, not only to cry it up, but to preach it up likewise: The Pulpit, as well as the Coffee-house, hath resounded with its Praise, and it is expected shortly, that his L—p will recommend it in a —— Letter to our whole Body.

And this Example, I am confident, will be imitated by all our Cloth in the Country: For besides speaking well of a Brother, in the Character of the Reverend Mr. Williams, the useful and truly religious Doctrine of Grace is every where inculcated.

This Book is the “Soul of Religion, Good-Breeding, Discretion, Good-Nature, Wit, Fancy, Fine Thought, and Morality. There is an Ease, a natural Air, a dignified Simplicity, and Measured Fullnessin it, that resembling Life, out-glows it. The Author hath reconciled the pleasing to the proper; the Thought is every where exactly cloathed by the Expression; and becomes its Dress as roundly and as close as Pamela her Country Habit; or as she doth her no Habit, when modest Beauty seeks to hide itself, by casting off the Pride of Ornament, and displays itself without any Covering;” which it frequently doth in this admirable Work, and presents Images to the Reader, which the coldest Zealot cannot read without Emotion.

For my own Part (and, I believe, I may say the same of all the Clergy of my Acquaintance) “I have done nothing but read it to others, and hear others again read it to me, ever since it came into my Hands; and I find I am like to do nothing else, for I know not how long yet to come: because if I lay the Book down it comes after me. When it has dwelt all Day long upon the Ear, it takes Possession all Night of the Fancy. It hath Witchcraft in every Page of it.——Oh! I feel an Emotion even while I am relating this: Methinks I see Pamela at this Instant, with all the Pride of Ornament cast off.

“Little Book, charming Pamela, get thee gone; face the World, in which thou wilt find nothing like thyself.” Happy would it be for Mankind, if all other Books were burnt, that we might do nothing but read thee all Day, and dream of thee all Night. Thou alone art sufficient to teach us as much Morality as we want. Dost thou not teach us to pray, to sing Psalms, and to honour the Clergy? Are not these the whole Duty of Man? Forgive me, O Author of Pamela, mentioning the Name of a Book so unequal to thine: But, now I think of it, who is the Author, where is he, what is he, that hath hitherto been able to hide such an encircling, all-mastering Spirit, “he possesses every Quality that Art could have charm'd by: yet hath lent it to and concealed it in Nature. The Comprehensiveness of his Imagination must be truly prodigious! It has stretched out this diminutive mere Grain of Mustard-seed (a poor Girl's little,&c.) into a Resemblance of that Heaven, which the best of good Books has compared it to.”

Musaicum Books presents to you this unique collection, designed and formatted to the highest digital standards and adjusted for readability on all devices. Les Misérables (Victor Hugo) The Call of the Wild (Jack London) Walden (Henry David Thoreau) Anna Karenina (Leo Tolstoy) War and Peace (Leo Tolstoy) Crime and Punishment (Fyodor Dostoevsky) Art of War (Sun Tzu) Dead Souls (Nikolai Gogol) Don Quixote (Miguel de Cervantes) Dona Perfecta (Benito Pérez Galdós) A Doll's House (Henrik Ibsen) Gitanjali (Rabindranath Tagore) The Life of Lazarillo de Tormes (Anonymous) Life is a Dream (Pedro Calderon de la Barca) The Divine Comedy (Dante) Decameron (Giovanni Boccaccio) The Prince (Machiavelli) Arabian Nights Hamlet (Shakespeare) Romeo and Juliet (Shakespeare) Robinson Crusoe (Daniel Defoe) Pride & Prejudice (Jane Austen) Frankenstein (Mary Shelley) Jane Eyre (Charlotte Brontë) Wuthering Heights (Emily Brontë) Great Expectations (Charles Dickens) Ulysses (James Joyce) Pygmalion (George Bernard Shaw) Ivanhoe (Sir Walter Scott) Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (Robert Louis Stevenson) Peter and Wendy (J. M. Barrie) The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Mark Twain) Moby-Dick (Herman Melville) Little Women (Louisa May Alcott) Leaves of Grass (Walt Whitman) The Raven (Edgar Allan Poe) Anne of Green Gables (L. M. Montgomery) Iliad & Odyssey (Homer) The Republic (Plato) Faust, a Tragedy (Johann Wolfgang von Goethe) Siddhartha (Herman Hesse) Thus Spoke Zarathustra (Friedrich Nietzsche) 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (Jules Verne) Journey to the Centre of the Earth (Jules Verne) The Hunchback of Notre Dame (Victor Hugo) The Flowers of Evil (Charles Baudelaire) The Count of Monte Cristo (Alexandre Dumas) The Poison Tree (Bankim Chandra Chatterjee) Shakuntala (Kalidasa) Rámáyan of Válmíki...
When it was determined to extend the present edition of Fielding, not merely by the addition of Jonathan Wild to the three universally popular novels, but by two volumes of Miscellanies, there could be no doubt about at least one of the contents of these latter. The Journal of a Voyage to Lisbon, if it does not rank in my estimation anywhere near to Jonathan Wild as an example of our author’s genius, is an invaluable and delightful document for his character and memory. It is indeed, as has been pointed out in the General Introduction to this series, our main source of indisputable information as to Fielding dans son naturel, and its value, so far as it goes, is of the very highest. The gentle and unaffected stoicism which the author displays under a disease which he knew well was probably, if not certainly, mortal, and which, whether mortal or not, must cause him much actual pain and discomfort of a kind more intolerable than pain itself; his affectionate care for his family; even little personal touches, less admirable, but hardly less pleasant than these, showing an Englishman’s dislike to be “done” and an Englishman’s determination to be treated with proper respect, are scarcely less noticeable and important on the biographical side than the unimpaired brilliancy of his satiric and yet kindly observation of life and character is on the side of literature. Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.
Musaicum Books presents to you this unique collection, designed and formatted to the highest digital standards and adjusted for readability on all devices: Hamlet (Shakespeare) Romeo and Juliet (Shakespeare) Macbeth (Shakespeare) Paradise Lost (John Milton) Gulliver's Travels (Jonathan Swift) Robinson Crusoe (Daniel Defoe) The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling (Henry Fielding) Tristram Shandy (Laurence Sterne) Pride & Prejudice (Jane Austen) Sense and Sensibility (Jane Austen) Vanity Fair (William Makepeace Thackeray) Ode to the West Wind (P. B. Shelley) Frankenstein (Mary Shelley) Odes (John Keats) Jane Eyre (Charlotte Brontë) Wuthering Heights (Emily Brontë) Middlemarch (George Eliot) David Copperfield (Charles Dickens) Great Expectations (Charles Dickens) Tess of the d'Urbervilles (Thomas Hardy) Jude the Obscure (Thomas Hardy) The Enchanted April (Elizabeth von Arnim) Sons and Lovers (D. H. Lawrence) The Mysteries of Udolpho (Ann Ward Radcliffe) Dracula (Bram Stoker) A Study in Scarlet (Arthur Conan Doyle) Heart of Darkness (Joseph Conrad) The Picture of Dorian Gray (Oscar Wilde) Alice in Wonderland (Lewis Carroll) The Secret Garden (Frances Hodgson Burnett) The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe (C. S. Lewis) Diary of a Nobody (George and Weedon Grossmith) The Time Machine (H. G. Wells) The War of the Worlds (H. G. Wells) The Woman in White (Wilkie Collins) The Innocence of Father Brown (G. K. Chesterton) Howards End (E. M. Forster) The Waste Land (T. S. Eliot) Ulysses (James Joyce) Pygmalion (George Bernard Shaw) Arms and the Man (George Bernard Shaw) The Second Coming (W. B. Yeats) Ivanhoe (Sir Walter Scott) Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (Robert Louis Stevenson) The Wind in the Willows (Kenneth Grahame) Phantastes (George MacDonald) Peter and Wendy (J. M. Barrie)
The ÔVoice of the YearÕ competition introduced and sponsored by Naxos AudioBooks and The Times books pages, edited by Erica Wagner, took place in Spring 2004. Readers without any formal drama training or professional acting experience were invited to send in recordings of a short extract of either Dickens, Austen or from The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame and an own choice. The judging panelÊÐ Martin Jarvis, Juliet Stevenson, and Anton Lesser, with John Tydeman, David Timson, and Christina Hardyment (audiobook reviewer for The Times), under the chairmanship of Naxos AudioBooksÕ managing director Nicolas SoamesÊÐ chose the winner and finalists from nearly one thousand entries. First prize was to read a classic for Naxos AudioBooks. The winner was Maurice West, a fifty-five-year-old English teacher from Croydon. His chosen piece was from Tom Jones and he was invited to read an extended abridgementÊÐ 6-CD setÊÐ of the same novel. ÔWe were very impressed by the natural storytelling talent shown by Mr West, with a strong narrative character, a sense of period style as well as a firm grasp of the many characters who appear,Õ said Nicolas Soames. After graduating from Cambridge, Mr West applied to LAMDA on the main acting course and was accepted. Unfortunately, he didnÕt have sufficient funds to take up the offer and had to confine his thespian interests to amateur dramatics. Now, later in life, he has a chance to open a new thread of activity. This 6ÊCD recording of Tom Jones is an important addition to the eighteenth-century audio library on Naxos AudioBooks.
Генри Филдинг (1707 — 1754) — знаменитый английский писатель и драматург XVIII века, известен своим житейским юмором и сатирическим мастерством. Один из основоположников реалистического романа.
Спектакль "Судья в ловушке" - комедия, обличающая несправедливость английского законодательства, продажность политических деятелей, систему подкупов, всяческие мошенничества. Судья Скуизем ради наживы арестовывает по ложному доносу капитана Костанта и моряка Рембла. Но вскоре сам попадает в “ловушку”, пытаясь соблазнить невесту Константа - Иларетту.

Радиопостановка
Московский академический театр сатиры

Действующие лица и исполнители:
Иларетта - Васильева Вера;
Моряки: Рембл - Холодов Р., Сотмор - Денисов Алексей, Констант - Ушаков Владимир;
Скуизем, мировой судья - Ячницкий Апполон;
Миссис Скуизем - Бенгис Е.;
Уорти, королевский судья - Димант Федор;
Изабелла, его сестра - Путяшева З.;
Политик - Кара-Дмитриев Дмитрий;
Стафф, констебль по наблюдению за нравственностью - Папанов Анатолий;
Куил, секретарь Скуизема - Тусузов Георгий; Фейсфул,
слуга в доме Политика - Козубский А.; Клорида,
служанка в доме Политика - Корсакова Е.; Брейзнкорт,
капитан, лжесвидетель - Байков Виктор.
Пояснительный текст - Менглет Георгий.
В массовых сценах заняты артисты театра.

Запись 1954 г.

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