Ebooks

The fully updated second edition of Teaching History Creatively introduces teachers to the wealth of available approaches to historical enquiry, ensuring creative, effective learning. This book clearly sets out the processes of historical enquiry, demonstrating how these are integrally linked with key criteria of creativity and helps readers to employ those features of creativity in the classroom. Underpinned by theory and research, it offers informed and practical support and is illustrated throughout with examples of children’s work. Key themes addressed include: investigating sources using archives in your own research project becoming historical agents and history detectives drama for exploring events myths and legends communicating historical understanding creatively.

With brand new chapters from the Stone Ages to the Iron Age, using prehistoric sources; The withdrawal of the Romans and the conquest and settlement of Britain by the Anglo-Saxons, in addition to many new case studies, this exciting edition puts an emphasis on accessible, recent research, new evidence and interpretations and encourages the creative dynamism of the study of history. Teaching History Creatively provides vivid and rich examples of the creative use of sources, of approaches to understanding chronology and concepts of time and of strategies to create interpretations. It is an essential purchase for any teacher or educator who wishes to embed creative approaches to teaching history in their classroom.

Writing History 7-11 supports students and primary teachers helping them to explore ways in which activities involving the talk that underpins historical enquiry can be developed into reading and exciting, extended, reflective writing.

The step that teachers and pupils take from ‘talk for learning’ to ‘talk for writing’ is a vital one. In this book the authors argue that all aspects of historical enquiry leading to writing involve discussion and dialogue which permeate every aspect of ‘doing history’. From this perspective they set out a theoretical framework for understanding the role of talk and reading in developing pupils’ critical thinking and confident reflective writing, then demonstrate through a series of case studies, in which teachers, university lecturers and pupils work together, how the theory is put into practice in the classroom.

Themes include:

How to support children in writing in a variety of interesting genres

How to make links between the National Curriculum (2013) for History and for English

How to plan for breadth and depth studies in the new National Curriculum

How activities in History 5 – 11 can be developed into exciting extended writing

The second half of the book draws upon case studies from a number of real primary classrooms with children of different ages. Each case study shows how teaching was planned to develop children’s confidence and enjoyment in discussion and to scaffold reasoned, written explanation and argument. Topics presented are all relevant to the new curriculum framework and include talking and reading about:

Time, change and significance over 6000 years - writing a television script

Celtic Britain and the Roman Army - writing a travel brochure about Celtic Britain

The destruction of Roman towns - writing a Saxon poem

An archaeological investigation of a body in a Danish peat bog - writing a newspaper report

Did any countries benefit from WW11? - writing an argued viewpoint

The expansion westwards of European settlers - writing a flap book exploring different perspectives.

This indispensable book provides not only sources for pupils to use in their writing, but also models and exemplars of different styles and voices to draw upon.

History Education is a politically contested subject. It can be used to both promote xenophobia and to develop critical thinking, multiple perspectives, and tolerance. Accordingly, this book critically examines complex issues and constructivist approaches that make history relevant to students’ understanding of the modern world. As such, it has global appeal especially in North and South America, Canada, Europe and Asia.

The book’s authors address the major challenges that History Education faces in an era of globalisation, digital revolution and international terror, nationalism and sectarian and religious conflict and warfare. Central to this volume are controversial issues, trauma, and questions of personal and national identity from a wide range of international settings and perspectives.

The research in this book was undertaken by leading history educators from every continent. Their interdisciplinary research represents an important contribution to the teaching of social sciences, social psychology, civic education programmes, history and history education in schools, colleges and universities.

The book offers new approaches to history educators at all levels. In addition, the chapters offer potential as required reading for students to both develop an international perspective and to compare and contrast their own situations with those that the book covers.

Section I considers issues related to identity; how can history education promote social coherence in multicultural societies, in societies divided by sectarianism, or countries adapting to regime changes, whether Communist or Fascist, including, for example, South Africa, previously Communist countries of Eastern Europe, and previous dictatorships in South America and Western Europe. It discusses such questions as: How important is it that students learn the content of history through the processes of historical enquiry? What should that content be and who should decide it, educators or politicians? What is the role of textbooks and who should write and select them? Should history be taught as a discrete discipline or as part of a citizenship or social sciences curriculum?

Sections II and III explore ways in which memory of sensitive issues related to the past, to war, or to massacres may be addressed. Are there new methodologies or approaches which make this possible? How can students understand situations involving intolerance and injustice?

The fully updated second edition of Teaching History Creatively introduces teachers to the wealth of available approaches to historical enquiry, ensuring creative, effective learning. This book clearly sets out the processes of historical enquiry, demonstrating how these are integrally linked with key criteria of creativity and helps readers to employ those features of creativity in the classroom. Underpinned by theory and research, it offers informed and practical support and is illustrated throughout with examples of children’s work. Key themes addressed include: investigating sources using archives in your own research project becoming historical agents and history detectives drama for exploring events myths and legends communicating historical understanding creatively.

With brand new chapters from the Stone Ages to the Iron Age, using prehistoric sources; The withdrawal of the Romans and the conquest and settlement of Britain by the Anglo-Saxons, in addition to many new case studies, this exciting edition puts an emphasis on accessible, recent research, new evidence and interpretations and encourages the creative dynamism of the study of history. Teaching History Creatively provides vivid and rich examples of the creative use of sources, of approaches to understanding chronology and concepts of time and of strategies to create interpretations. It is an essential purchase for any teacher or educator who wishes to embed creative approaches to teaching history in their classroom.

Writing History 7-11 supports students and primary teachers helping them to explore ways in which activities involving the talk that underpins historical enquiry can be developed into reading and exciting, extended, reflective writing.

The step that teachers and pupils take from ‘talk for learning’ to ‘talk for writing’ is a vital one. In this book the authors argue that all aspects of historical enquiry leading to writing involve discussion and dialogue which permeate every aspect of ‘doing history’. From this perspective they set out a theoretical framework for understanding the role of talk and reading in developing pupils’ critical thinking and confident reflective writing, then demonstrate through a series of case studies, in which teachers, university lecturers and pupils work together, how the theory is put into practice in the classroom.

Themes include:

How to support children in writing in a variety of interesting genres

How to make links between the National Curriculum (2013) for History and for English

How to plan for breadth and depth studies in the new National Curriculum

How activities in History 5 – 11 can be developed into exciting extended writing

The second half of the book draws upon case studies from a number of real primary classrooms with children of different ages. Each case study shows how teaching was planned to develop children’s confidence and enjoyment in discussion and to scaffold reasoned, written explanation and argument. Topics presented are all relevant to the new curriculum framework and include talking and reading about:

Time, change and significance over 6000 years - writing a television script

Celtic Britain and the Roman Army - writing a travel brochure about Celtic Britain

The destruction of Roman towns - writing a Saxon poem

An archaeological investigation of a body in a Danish peat bog - writing a newspaper report

Did any countries benefit from WW11? - writing an argued viewpoint

The expansion westwards of European settlers - writing a flap book exploring different perspectives.

This indispensable book provides not only sources for pupils to use in their writing, but also models and exemplars of different styles and voices to draw upon.

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