This carefully crafted ebook: “IMMANUEL KANT Premium Collection: Complete Critiques, Philosophical Works and Essays (Including Kant’s Inaugural Dissertation)” is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. Table of Contents: Introduction: IMMANUEL KANT by Robert Adamson KANT’S INAUGURAL DISSERTATION OF 1770 Three Critiques: THE CRITIQUE OF PURE REASON THE CRITIQUE OF PRACTICAL REASON THE CRITIQUE OF JUDGMENT Critical Works: PRELOGOMENA TO ANY FUTURE METAPHYSICS FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES OF THE METAPHYSIC OF MORALS THE METAPHYSICS OF MORALS Philosophy of Law; or, The Science of Right The Metaphysical Elements of Ethics Pre-Critical Works and Essays: DREAMS OF A SPIRIT-SEER IDEA OF A UNIVERSAL HISTORY ON A COSMOPOLITICAL PLAN Preface to THE METAPHYSICAL FOUNDATIONS OF NATURAL SCIENCE PERPETUAL PEACE: A Philosophical Essay OF THE INJUSTICE OF COUNTERFEITING BOOKS Criticism: CRITICISM OF THE KANTIAN PHILOSOPHY by Arthur Schopenhauer Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) was a German philosopher, who, according to the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy is "the central figure of modern philosophy." Kant argued that fundamental concepts of the human mind structure human experience, that reason is the source of morality, that aesthetics arises from a faculty of disinterested judgment, that space and time are forms of our understanding, and that the world as it is "in-itself" is unknowable. Kant took himself to have effected a Copernican revolution in philosophy, akin to Copernicus' reversal of the age-old belief that the sun revolved around the earth.
 Regarded as the central figure of modern philosophy, Immanuel Kant produced comprehensive and systematic work in the theory of knowledge, ethics and aesthetics, which greatly influenced all subsequent philosophy. In his major work, ‘The Critique of Pure Reason’, Kant analyses the relationship between reason and human experience, moving beyond the failures of traditional philosophy and metaphysics. This comprehensive eBook presents Kant’s collected works, with numerous illustrations, rare texts appearing in digital print for the first time, informative introductions and the usual Delphi bonus material. (Version 1)


* Beautifully illustrated with images relating to Kant’s life and works

* Concise introductions to the essays

* All the major works, with individual contents tables

* Includes rare texts appearing for the first time in digital publishing

* Images of how the books were first published, giving your eReader a taste of the original texts

* Excellent formatting of the texts

* Special criticism section, with 8 essays and books evaluating Kant’s contribution to philosophy

* Features two biographies - discover Kant’s literary life

* Scholarly ordering of texts into chronological order and literary genres


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CONTENTS:


The Books

UNIVERSAL NATURAL HISTORY AND THEORY OF HEAVEN

DREAMS OF A SPIRIT-SEER

DISSERTATION ON THE FORM AND PRINCIPLES OF THE SENSIBLE AND THE INTELLIGIBLE WORLD: INAUGURAL DISSERTATION 1770

THE CRITIQUE OF PURE REASON

PROLEGOMENA TO ANY FUTURE METAPHYSICS THAT WILL BE ABLE TO PRESENT ITSELF AS A SCIENCE

AN ANSWER TO THE QUESTION: “WHAT IS ENLIGHTENMENT?"

IDEA FOR A UNIVERSAL HISTORY WITH A COSMOPOLITAN PURPOSE

FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES OF THE METAPHYSIC OF MORALS

METAPHYSICAL FOUNDATIONS OF NATURAL SCIENCE

CRITIQUE OF PRACTICAL REASON

CRITIQUE OF JUDGEMENT

RELIGION WITHIN THE BOUNDS OF BARE REASON

PERPETUAL PEACE

METAPHYSICS OF MORALS: THE PHILOSOPHY OF LAW

OF THE INJUSTICE OF COUNTERFEITING BOOKS

ON EDUCATION


The Criticism

A COMMENTARY TO KANT’S ‘CRITIQUE OF PURE REASON’ by Norman Kemp Smith

SCIENCE AND RELIGION — KANT, LAMBERT, LAPLACE, SIR WILLIAM HERSCHEL by Walter Libby

THE PHILOSOPHY OF IMMANUEL KANT by A. D. Lindsay

IMMANUEL KANT by Elbert Hubbard

THE LAST DAYS OF IMMANUEL KANT by Thomas De Quincey

AN OUTLINE OF THE HISTORY OF CHRISTIAN THOUGHT SINCE KANT by Edward Caldwell Moore

KANT’S THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE by H. A. Prichard

INTRODUCTION TO KANT by Ralph Barton Perry


The Biographies

MEMOIR OF KANT by Thomas Kingsmill Abbott

IMMANUEL KANT by Robert Adamson

The Delphi Classics Catalogue


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Musaicum Books presents to you this carefully created volume of "The Greatest Works of Immanuel Kant". This ebook has been designed and formatted to the highest digital standards and adjusted for readability on all devices. Contents: Introduction: IMMANUEL KANT by Robert Adamson KANT'S INAUGURAL DISSERTATION OF 1770 Three Critiques: THE CRITIQUE OF PURE REASON THE CRITIQUE OF PRACTICAL REASON THE CRITIQUE OF JUDGMENT Critical Works: PRELOGOMENA TO ANY FUTURE METAPHYSICS FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES OF THE METAPHYSIC OF MORALS THE METAPHYSICS OF MORALS Philosophy of Law; or, The Science of Right The Metaphysical Elements of Ethics Pre-Critical Works and Essays: DREAMS OF A SPIRIT-SEER IDEA OF A UNIVERSAL HISTORY ON A COSMOPOLITICAL PLAN Preface to THE METAPHYSICAL FOUNDATIONS OF NATURAL SCIENCE PERPETUAL PEACE: A Philosophical Essay OF THE INJUSTICE OF COUNTERFEITING BOOKS Criticism: CRITICISM OF THE KANTIAN PHILOSOPHY by Arthur Schopenhauer Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) was a German philosopher, who, according to the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy is "the central figure of modern philosophy." Kant argued that fundamental concepts of the human mind structure human experience, that reason is the source of morality, that aesthetics arises from a faculty of disinterested judgment, that space and time are forms of our understanding, and that the world as it is "in-itself" is unknowable. Kant took himself to have effected a Copernican revolution in philosophy, akin to Copernicus' reversal of the age-old belief that the sun revolved around the earth.
'beauty has purport and significance only for human beings, for beings at once animal and rational' In the Critique of Judgement (1790) Kant offers a penetrating analysis of our experience of the beautiful and the sublime, discussing the objectivity of taste, aesthetic disinterestedness, the relation of art and nature, the role of imagination, genius and originality, the limits of representation and the connection between morality and the aesthetic. He also investigates the validity of our judgements concerning the apparent purposiveness of nature with respect to the highest interests of reason and enlightenment. The work profoundly influenced the artists and writers of the classical and romantic period and the philosophy of Hegel and Schelling. It has remained a central point of reference from Schopenhauer and Nietzsche through to phenomenology, hermeneutics, the Frankfurt School, analytical aesthetics and contemporary critical theory. J. C. Meredith's classic translation has been revised in accordance with standard modern renderings and provided with a bilingual glossary. This edition also includes the important 'First Introduction' that Kant originally composed for the work. ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.
Originally published in 1929. PREFACE: THE present translation was begun in 1913, when I was completing my Commentary to Kants Critique of Pure Reason Owing, however, to various causes, I was unable at that time to do more than prepare a rough translation of about a third of the whole and it was not until 1927 that I found leisure to revise and continue it. In this task I have greatly profited by the work of my two predecessors, J. M. D. Meiklejohn and Max Muller. Meiklejohn's work, a translation of the second edition of the Critique was published in 1855. Max Mullers translation, which is based on the first edition of the Critique, with the second edition passages in appendices, was published in 1881. Meiklejohn has a happy gift which only those who attempt to follow in his steps can, I think, fully appreciate of making Kant speak in language that reasonably approximates to English idiom. Max Mullers main merit, as he has very justly claimed, is his greater accuracy in rendering passages in which a specially exact appreciation of the niceties of German idiom happens to be important for the sense. Both Meiklejohn and Max Muller laboured, however, under the disadvantage of not having made any very thorough study of the Critical Philosophy and the shortcomings in their translations can usually be traced to this cause. In the past fifty years, also, much has been done in the study and interpretation of the text. In particular, my task has been facilitated by the quite invaluable edition of the Critique edited by Dr. Raymund Schmidt. Indeed, the appearance of this edition in 1926 was the immediate occasion of my resuming the work of translation. Dr. Schmidts restoration of the original texts of the first and second editions of the Critique, and especially of Kants own punctuation so very helpful in many difficult and doubtful passages and his citation of alternative readings, have largely relieved me of the time-consuming task of collating texts, and of assembling the emendations suggested by Kantian scholars in their editions of the Critique or in their writings upon it. The text which I have followed is that of the second edition (1787) and I have in all cases indicated any departure from it. I have also given a translation of all first edition passages which in the second edition have been either altered or omitted. Wherever possible, this original first edition text is given in the lower part of the page. In the two sections, however, which Kant completely recast in the second edition The Transcendental Deduction of the Categories and The Paralogisms of Pure Reason this cannot conveniently be done and I have therefore given the two versions in immediate succession, in the main text. For this somewhat unusual procedure there is a twofold justification first, that the Critique is already, in itself, a composite work, the different parts of which record the successive stages in the development of Kants views and secondly, that the first edition versions are, as a matter of fact, indispensable for an adequate under standing of the versions which were substituted for them. The paging's of both the first and the second edition are given throughout, on the margins the first edition being referred to as A, the second edition as B.
This carefully crafted ebook: “THE THREE CRITIQUES: The Critique of Pure Reason, The Critique of Practical Reason & The Critique of Judgment” is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. The Critique of Pure Reason is one of the most influential works in the history of philosophy. Kant here explains what he means by a critique of pure reason: "I do not mean by this a critique of books and systems, but of the faculty of reason in general, in respect of all knowledge after which it may strive independently of all experience." The Critique of Practical Reason is the second of Immanuel Kant's three critiques and it deals with his moral philosophy. The second Critique exercised a decisive influence over the subsequent development of the field of ethics and moral philosophy, beginning with Johann Gottlieb Fichte's Doctrine of Science. The Critique of Judgment, also translated as the Critique of the Power of Judgment completes the Critical project begun in the Critique of Pure Reason. The book is divided into two main sections: the Critique of Aesthetic Judgment and the Critique of Teleological Judgment, and also includes a large overview of the entirety of Kant's Critical system, arranged in its final form. Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) was a German philosopher, who, according to the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy is "the central figure of modern philosophy." Kant argued that fundamental concepts of the human mind structure human experience, that reason is the source of morality, that aesthetics arises from a faculty of disinterested judgment, that space and time are forms of our understanding, and that the world as it is "in-itself" is unknowable. Kant took himself to have effected a Copernican revolution in philosophy, akin to Copernicus' reversal of the age-old belief that the sun revolved around the earth. Table of Contents: THE CRITIQUE OF PURE REASON THE CRITIQUE OF PRACTICAL REASON THE CRITIQUE OF JUDGMENT
01. F.Scott Fitzgerald - The Curious Case of Benjamin Button 02. O.Henry - The Gift of the Magi 03. Mark Twain - On The Decay of the Art of Lying 04. Sun Tzu - The Art of War 05. E.A. Poe - The Raven 06. Kahlil Gibran - The Madman 07. W.W. Jacobs - The Monkey's Paw 08. Anonymous - Aladdin 09. The Founding Fathers - The Declaration of Independence 10. Plato - The Apology of Socrates 11. Lord Alfred Tennyson - Charge of the Light Brigade 12. T.S. Eliot - The Waste Land 13. William Dean Howells - Wild Flowers of the Asphalt 14. Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels - The Communist Manifesto 15. E.A. Poe - The Pit and the Pendulum 16. F. Scott Fitzgerald - The Offshore Pirate 17. Leo Tolstoy - A Letter to a Hindu 18. Washington Irving - The Legend of Sleepy Hollow 19. Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Kubla Khan 20. F. Scott Fitzgerald - Camel's Back 21. Bram Stoker - The Judge's House 22. Lao Tzu - Tao Te Ching 23. Plato - The Allegory of the Cave 24. Oscar Wilde - The Happy Prince 25. Oscar Wilde - The Nightingale and the Rose 26. William Blake - Songs of Innocence 27. Patrick Henry - Give Me Liberty 28. H.G. Wells - The Magic Shop 29. Saki - The Music on the Hill 30. Herman Melville - Bartleby the scrivener 31. Mark Twain - The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County 32. Clement Clarke Moore - Twas the Night Before Christmas 33. Bret Harte - The Luck of Roaring Camp 34. O.Henry - The Caballero's Way 35. T.S. Eliot - The Love Song of J. Alfred Profrock 36. Immanuel Kant - Answering the Question: What is Enlightenment? 37. Jack London - To Build a Fire 38. Edgar Allan Poe - The Fall of the House of Usher 39. Henry Ford - The Terror of the Machine 40. G.K. Chesterton - The Blue Cross 41. Charles Perrault - Cinderella 42. Anton Chekhov - Difficult People 43. D.H. Lawrence - The Prussian Officer 44. Fyodor Dostoevsky - The Dream of A Ridiculous Man 45. Franz Kafka - The Judgement 46. James Joyce - The Dead 47. Saki - The Unrest Cure 48. John Muir - Steep Trails 49. Anton Chekhov - Lady with a Dog 50. Anton Chekhov - The Wife

These works articulate the most fundamental principles of Kant’s ethical and political world-view. “What is Enlightenment?” (1784) and Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysics of Morals (1785) were written in the period between the American Revolution and the French Revolution.

Taken together they challenge all free people to think about the requirements for self-determination both in our individual lives and in our public and private institutions.

Kant’s Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysics of Morals is dedicated to the proposition that all people can know what we need to know to be honest, good, wise, and virtuous.

The purpose of Kant’s moral philosophy is to help us become aware of the principles that are already contained within us. Innocence and dependence must be replaced with wisdom and good will if we are to avoid being vulnerable and misguided. According to Kant, freedom of thought leads naturally to freedom of action. When that happens, governments begin to treat human beings, not as machines, but as persons with dignity.

Immanuel Kant begins "Toward Lasting Peace" by contrasting the realism of practical politicians with the high-minded theories of philosophers who “dream their sweet dreams.” His opening line provides a grim reminder that the only alternative to finding a way to avoid the war of each against all is the lasting peace of the graveyard. The advent of total war and the development of nuclear weapons in the twentieth century give Kant’s reflections an urgency he could not have anticipated.

Kant published this work in 1795, during the aftermath of the American Revolution and the French Revolution. The high hopes of the European Enlightenment had been dampened by the Reign of Terror in which tens of thousands of people died, and the perpetual cycle of war and temporary armistice seemed to be inescapable. Kant’s essay is best known as an early articulation of the idea of a league of nations that could bring “an end to all hostilities.” Today The United Nations continues to pursue that dream, but lasting peace still seems to be wishful thinking.

These works articulate the most fundamental principles of Kant's ethical and political worldview. What Is Enlightenment? (1784) and Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysics of Morals (1785) were written in the period between the American Revolution and the French Revolution. Taken together, they challenge all free people to think about the requirements for self-determination both in our individual lives and in our public and private institutions.


Kant's Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysics of Morals is dedicated to the proposition that all people can know what we need to know to be honest, good, wise, and virtuous. The purpose of Kant's moral philosophy is to help us become aware of the principles that are already contained within us. Innocence and dependence must be replaced with wisdom and goodwill if we are to avoid being vulnerable and misguided.


According to Kant, freedom of thought leads naturally to freedom of action. When that happens, governments begin to treat human beings not as machines but as persons with dignity. Immanuel Kant begins Toward Lasting Peace by contrasting the realism of practical politicians with the high-minded theories of philosophers who dream their sweet dreams. His opening line provides a grim reminder that the only alternative to finding a way to avoid the war of each against all is the lasting peace of the graveyard. The advent of total war and the development of nuclear weapons in the 20th century give Kant's reflections an urgency he could not have anticipated.


Kant published this work in 1795, during the aftermath of the American Revolution and the French Revolution. The high hopes of the European Enlightenment had been dampened by the Reign of Terror in which tens of thousands of people died, and the perpetual cycle of war and temporary armistice seemed to be inescapable. Kant's essay is best known as an early articulation of the idea of a league of nations that could bring an end to all hostilities. Today, the United Nations continues to pursue that dream, but lasting peace still seems to be wishful thinking.


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