Less cost! More features! Bragging rights!

Let's face it: Woodworking isn't cheap. Wood and materials alone can cost a small fortune. And well-designed commercial woodworking machines are often so expensive that they are beyond the reach of many home woodworkers. So what's a woodworker to do? Do what Stumpy Nubs does and build your own!

In The Homemade Woodshop, James Hamilton, creator of the popular Stumpy Nubs website, shows you how to build woodworking machines for a fraction of the cost of store-bought models--and with more features to boot! You'll discover 12 detailed projects for building precise, durable shop-made machines including:

   • Sliding-top router table that makes joinery safe and easy
   • Multi-function downdraft table that combines dust collection with countless workholding applications
   • Sliding crosscut table that gives your table saw the precision and convenience of a high-end European saw
   • 24" band saw that offers all of the throat capacity of an industrial model in a size that will fit on a benchtop
   • Crosscut "super-sled" that allows you to create box joints, splined miters, tenons and more
   • Table saw workstation that affords you a complete workshop in a 4' x 8' footprint
   • And 7 more!
The projects in this book not only save you money, but they allow you to add more features and, ultimately, greater precision and more versatility to the machines in your shop. And let's face it: Having a shop outfitted with machines that you built yourself is just cool.
1961. A squadron of Vulcan aircraft, Britain's most lethal nuclear bomber, flies towards the east coast of the United States. Highly manoeuvrable, the great delta-winged machines are also equipped with state of the art electronic warfare devices that jam American radar systems. Evading the fighters scrambled to intercept them, the British aircraft target Washington and New York, reducing them to smoking ruins.

They would have done, at least, if this were not an exercise. This extraordinary raid (which actually took place) opens James Hamilton-Paterson's remarkable novel about the lives of British pilots at the height of the Cold War, when aircrew had to be on call 24 hours a day to fly their nuclear-armed V-bombers to the Western USSR and devastate the lives of millions.

This is the story of Squadron-Leader Amos McKenna, a Vulcan pilot who is suffering from desires and frustrations that are tearing his marriage apart and making him question his ultimate loyalties. Relations with the American cousins are tense; the future of the RAF bomber fleet is in doubt. And there is a spy at RAF Wearsby, who is selling secrets to his Russian handlers in seedy East Anglian cafes.

A macabre Christmas banquet at which aircrew under intolerable pressures go crazy, with tragic consequences, and a dramatic and disastrous encounter with the Americans in the Libyan desert, are among the high points of a novel that surely conveys the beauty and danger of flying better than any other in recent English literature.

J.M.W. Turner was a painter whose treatment of light put him squarely in the pantheon of the world’s preeminent artists, but his character was a tangle of fascinating contradictions. While he could be coarse and rude, manipulative, ill-mannered, and inarticulate, he was also generous, questioning, and humane, and he displayed through his work a hitherto unrecognized optimism about the course of human progress. With two illegitimate daughters and several mistresses whom Turner made a career of not including in his public life, the painter was also known for his entrepreneurial cunning, demanding and receiving the highest prices for his work.

Over the course of sixty years, Turner traveled thousands of miles to seek out the landscapes of England and Europe. He was drawn overwhelmingly to coasts, to the electrifying rub of the land with the sea, and he regularly observed their union from the cliff, the beach, the pier, or from a small boat. Fueled by his prodigious talent, Turner revealed to himself and others the personality of the British and European landscapes and the moods of the surrounding seas. He kept no diary, but his many sketchbooks are intensely autobiographical, giving clues to his techniques, his itineraries, his income and expenditures, and his struggle to master the theories of perspective.

In Turner, James Hamilton takes advantage of new material discovered since the 1975 bicentennial celebration of the artist’s birth, paying particular attention to the diary of sketches with which Turner narrated his life. Hamilton’s textured portrait is fully complemented by a sixteen-page illustrations insert, including many color reproductions of Turner’s most famous landscape paintings. Seamlessly blending vibrant biography with astute art criticism, Hamilton writes with energy, style, and erudition to address the contradictions of this great artist.
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