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Ever since the first contacts between Europe and Africa, African people have been confined to the fringes of Eurocentric experience in the Western mind. Much of what we have studied in African history and culture, or literature and linguistics, or politics and economics, has been orchestrated from the standpoint of Europe's interests. Whether it is a matter of economics, history, politics, geographical concepts, or art, Africans have been seen as peripheral. This volume reviews the past in order to evaluate the present and move ahead with appropriate policies for the future. The authors focus on issues of affirmative action, legal culture, theories of black culture, and methodologies of scholarly work in Africana studies. Contents include: Cecil Blake, "The Culture Nexus Construct in Africana Studies," Ronald Turner, "On Palatable, Palliative, and Paralytic Affirmative Action, Grutter-Style," Winston A. Van Horne, "Three Concepts of Legitimacy," Robert E. Weems, Jr., "Africana Studies and the Quest for Black Economic Empowerment: What Can be Done," Ula Y. Taylor, "Elijah Muhammad's Nation of Islam: Separatism, Regendering, and a Secular Approach to Black Power after Malcolm X," Lewis R. Gordon, "Must Revolutionaries Sing the Blues? Thinking through Fanon and the Leitmotif of the Black Arts Movement," Delores P. Aldridge, "Race, Gender, and Africana Theorizing," and James L. Conyers, "Biography and Africology: Method and Interpretation." The volume concludes with reviews of significant recent scholarship on black history and culture. Law, Culture, and Africana Studies will have particular interest for scholars in the fields of American and European studies, cultural studies, history, sociology, and specialists in African-American studies.
Ever since the first contacts between Europe and Africa, African people have operated from the fringes of Eurocentric experience in the Western mind. Much of what we have studied in African history and culture, or literature and linguistics, or politics and economics, has been orchestrated from the standpoint of Europe's interests. Whether it is a matter of economics, history, politics, geographical concepts, or art, Africans have been seen as peripheral. This volume reviews the past in order to evaluate the present and move ahead with appropriate policies for the future. The articles in this volume, the first in a new serial publication in Africana studies, cover a broad range of subject matter and methodology. Topics range from the W.E.B. DuBois-Booker T. Washington schism that led to the formation of the Niagara movement, to the popular dissemination of black hip-hop culture. It opens with a description of Afrocentricity by Molefi K. Asante. Kobi K.K. Kambon and Reginald Rackley discuss the construct, that produces European cultural "misidentification" among Africans. Nell Irvin Painter, in discussing the Shoah and Southern history, parallels the rhetoric of hate that permeated the late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century German diatribes against Jews with that of the Southern white supremacists against blacks. Anthony B. Pinn notes similarities that tie together slavery and colonialism in a bond of existential and ontological destruction. Anthony J. Lemelle, Jr., examines critical issues about black masculinity. James B. Stewart elaborates on the development of Africana studies. Julius E. Thompson explores the historical importance of the African-American writer in Mississippi history. Cary DeCordova Wintz the basis of the conflict between W.E.B. DuBois and Booker T. Washington in an effort to expose its underlying causes. James L. Conyers, Jr. summarizes social and cultural movements, in particular the popular black hip-hop culture. Rounding out the presentations, Lea Redmond and Charles P. Henry trace the roots of black studies in the United States. Afrocentric Traditions will have particular interest for scholars in the fields of American studies, cultural studies, historians, sociologists, and specialists in African-American studies. James L. Conyers, Jr., is a University Professor of African American Studies and director, African American studies program, University of Houston.
African American Consciousness focuses on ideas of culture, race, and class within the interdisciplinary matrix of Africana Studies. Even more important, it uses a methodology that emphasizes interpretation and the necessity of interdisciplinary research and writing in a global society. Worldview, culture, analytic thinking, and historiography can all be used as tools of analysis, and in the process of discovery, use pedagogy, and survey research of Africana history. Advancing the idea of Africana Studies, mixed methodology, and triangulation, the contributors provide alternative approaches toward examining this phenomena, with regard to place, space, and time. The essays in this volume include Reynaldo Anderson, “Black History dot.com”; Greg Carr, “Black Consciousness, Pan-Africanism and the African World History Project”; Karanja Carroll, “A Genealogical Review of the Worldview Concept and Framework in Africana Studies”; Denise Martin, “Reflections on African Celestial Culture”; Serie McDougal “Teaching Black Males”; Demetrius Pearson, “Cowboys of Color”; Pamela Reed, “Heirs to Disparity”; and Andrew Smallwood, “Malcolm X’s Leadership and Legacy.” The researchers in this volume investigate, explore, and review patterns of functional, normative, and expressive behavior. The past and present of Africana culture is represented, showing how reflexivity can be an adjustable concept to organize, process, and interpret data. Moreover, humanism and social science demonstrate how researchers establish, extract, and identify the limitations and alternative approaches to research of the historic conditions of black Americans.
Africana Theory, Policy, and Leadership is an eclectic work that examines Africana issues from multiple angles, including literature, ethnography, gender, aesthetics, and diversity. The contributors to this volume add unique and insightful works to the collection of research and writing documenting the pan-African experience. Conyers offers the reader an interdisciplinary approach to the study of people of African descent with special emphasis on the black population of the United States. This collection addresses a wide range of topics. “Africana Literature as Social Science” reviews the scholarship of August Wilson and Suzan Lori-Parks. “How Homeland Eritrea Monitors Its American Diaspora” analyzes Eritrean government-diaspora tensions. “Toward Theorizing Gender without Feminism” and “Are Black Women the New Mules of the Prison Industrial Complex?” illustrates the double burden of race and gender borne by black women. “Africana Aesthetics” documents black life in post-Civil War Texas with photos. “Africana Studies and Diversity” explores the struggle to maintain athletic programs at historically black colleges. “The Africana Idea in Leadership Studies” offers an Afrocentric approach to the study of critical theory in leadership. This volume presents examples of Africana scholarship in major areas of work, including literature, politics, feminist studies, criminology, history, and sports studies, and is the most recent volume in Transaction’s Africana Studies series.
This is a must read book for anyone interested in the areas of racial theory and racial relations, multicultural and polarized religions, and the making of African personality and culture. In keeping with earlier volumes in the series, it emphasizes the cross-fertilization of Africa and the world. In "Binga Bank: Th e Development of the Black Metropolis" Beth Johnson gives an historic look at the opening of the Binga Bank, its founder, and how the bank helped stimulate the black metropolis in Chicago. "Black on the Block" takes a look at life in the community of North Kenwood-Oakland, California. Mark Christian describes what it is like to be a member in the African diaspora in the United States and United Kingdom. In the racial theory and racial relations area, Clarence Tally's "The æRace' Concept and Racial Structure" argues that the study of race has become dominated by the idea that race is socially constructed. Reiland Rabaka analyzes discourse on the process of awarding reparations to people of African origin. Paula A. Moore explains why people of African descent with mental health problems do not receive treatment. "Patriot Day" focuses on the emergence and growth of Islam in America and its struggle to connect with America's cultural heritage. "Edward Wilmot Blyden and the African Personality," by James Conyers, reviews Blyden's ideas and beliefs challenging the European worldview. "Cultural Helix Th eory" examines the most fundamental component of African culture, language and how it aff ects the black community. "Black in the Saddle" by Demetrius W. Pearson chronicles the professional and personal experiences of Willie Thomas, an African American cowboy.
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