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A unique guide, like none other on the market-packed with medical information, practical tips, psychological insight, and coping strategies--to help men help the women they love through this trying time.

When Marc Silver became a breast cancer husband three years ago, he learned firsthand how frightened and helpless the breast cancer husband feels. He searched in vain for a book that would give him the information and advice he so desperately sought. Now this award-winning journalist has compiled just the kind of emotionally supportive and useful resource that he wished he had been able to consult-to give men the tools they need to help their wives, their families, and themselves through this scary, uncertain time.

In his years as a consumer journalist and veteran of the News You Can Use staff at U.S. News & World Report, Marc Silver learned what kind of information and advice on medical crises readers found most valuable. He draws on that experience as he covers in depth all the issues couples coping with breast cancer will have to face during diagnosis, treatment, and beyond. Highlights include:
- The shared experiences of other breast cancer husbands
- Guidance from top cancer doctors in the country
- Advice on when, how, and what to tell your young children
- Tips on coping with radiation and chemotherapy
- A candid discussion of sex and intimacy following breast cancer surgery

More than 200,000 women are diagnosed with cancer each year in the United States. At last, with this book, the men who love them have a road map to help them through a difficult and unprecedented journey.
Academic discourse is the principle means by which knowledge is constituted in the world today and English is the globalized language in and through which such knowledge most often gets constructed and transmitted. Be it in the form of specialized books, disciplinary journals, international congresses or university lectures, the influence and power of such discourse is enormous. Most students and scholars, however, concern themselves almost exclusively with 'what' is written or said within such discourse, ignoring the often more important question of 'how' what is written or said is expressed or received. This book analyzes and contrasts ways in which writers from the disciplines of History and Economics present themselves and their knowledge claims to their readers, in an attempt to understand how common lexico-grammatical and pragmatic elements of texts act to persuade the readers of the knowledge claims being brought forth, as well as to see how the writers position themselves as they are making these claims. The work investigates the way academic writers construct disciplinary identity through display of their ideas or assumptions, the persuasive forms of argumentation they employ and how they represent themselves and others in their texts. In doing so, it aims as well to establish the consistency and the effects of such disciplinary identity by highlighting a few of the ideological and epistemological consequences of the choices made by each of the disciplinary (or discourse) communities.
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