Shortlisted for the 2016 Man Booker Prize and chosen by David Sedaris as his recommended book for his Fall 2016 tour. 

So here we are. My name was Eileen Dunlop. Now you know me. I was twenty-four years old then, and had a job that paid fifty-seven dollars a week as a kind of secretary at a private juvenile correctional facility for teenage boys. I think of it now as what it really was for all intents and purposes—a prison for boys. I will call it Moorehead. Delvin Moorehead was a terrible landlord I had years later, and so to use his name for such a place feels appropriate. In a week, I would run away from home and never go back.

This is the story of how I disappeared.

The Christmas season offers little cheer for Eileen Dunlop, an unassuming yet disturbed young woman trapped between her role as her alcoholic father’s caretaker in a home whose squalor is the talk of the neighborhood and a day job as a secretary at the boys’ prison, filled with its own quotidian horrors. Consumed by resentment and self-loathing, Eileen tempers her dreary days with perverse fantasies and dreams of escaping to the big city. In the meantime, she fills her nights and weekends with shoplifting, stalking a buff prison guard named Randy, and cleaning up her increasingly deranged father’s messes. When the bright, beautiful, and cheery Rebecca Saint John arrives on the scene as the new counselor at Moorehead, Eileen is enchanted and proves unable to resist what appears at first to be a miraculously budding friendship. In a Hitchcockian twist, her affection for Rebecca ultimately pulls her into complicity in a crime that surpasses her wildest imaginings.

Played out against the snowy landscape of coastal New England in the days leading up to Christmas, young Eileen’s story is told from the gimlet-eyed perspective of the now much older narrator. Creepy, mesmerizing, and sublimely funny, in the tradition of Shirley Jackson and early Vladimir Nabokov, this powerful debut novel enthralls and shocks, and introduces one of the most original new voices in contemporary literature.
From one of our most ceaselessly provocative literary talents, a novel of haunting metaphysical suspense about an elderly widow whose life is upturned when she finds a cryptic note on a walk in the woods that ultimately makes her question everything about her new home

While on her normal daily walk with her dog in the nearby forest woods, our protagonist comes across a note, handwritten and carefully pinned to the ground with a frame of stones. Her name was Magda. Nobody will ever know who killed her. It wasn't me. Here is her dead body. Our narrator is deeply shaken; she has no idea what to make of this. She is new to this area, having moved here from her longtime home after the death of her husband, and she knows very few people. And she's a little shaky even on her best days. Her brooding about this note quickly grows into a full-blown obsession, and she begins to devote herself to exploring the possibilities of her conjectures about who this woman was and how she met her fate. Her suppositions begin to find echoes in the real world, and with mounting excitement and dread, the fog of mystery starts to form into a concrete and menacing shape. But as we follow her in her investigation, strange dissonances start to accrue, and our faith in her grip on reality weakens, until finally, just as she seems to be facing some of the darkness in her own past with her late husband, we are forced to face the prospect that there is either a more innocent explanation for all this or a much more sinister one--one that strikes closer to home.

A triumphant blend of horror, suspense, and pitch-black comedy, Death in Her Hands asks us to consider how the stories we tell ourselves both guide us closer to the truth and keep us at bay from it. Once again, we are in the hands of a narrator whose unreliability is well earned, only this time the stakes have never been higher.
A New York Times Book Review Notable Book of 2017

An electrifying first collection from one of the most exciting short story writers of our time

"I can’t recall the last time I laughed this hard at a book. Simultaneously, I’m shocked and scandalized. She’s brilliant, this young woman."—David Sedaris

Ottessa Moshfegh's debut novel Eileen was one of the literary events of 2015. Garlanded with critical acclaim, it was named a book of the year by The Washington Post and the San Francisco Chronicle, nominated for a National Book Critics Circle Award, short-listed for the Man Booker Prize, and won the PEN/Hemingway Award for debut fiction. But as many critics noted, Moshfegh is particularly held in awe for her short stories. Homesick for Another World is the rare case where an author's short story collection is if anything more anticipated than her novel.

And for good reason. There's something eerily unsettling about Ottessa Moshfegh's stories, something almost dangerous, while also being delightful, and even laugh-out-loud funny. Her characters  are all unsteady on their feet in one way or another; they all yearn for connection and betterment, though each in very different ways, but they are often tripped up by their own baser impulses and existential insecurities. Homesick for Another World is a master class in the varieties of self-deception across the gamut of individuals representing the human condition. But part of the unique quality of her voice, the echt Moshfeghian experience, is the way the grotesque and the outrageous are infused with tenderness and compassion.  Moshfegh is our Flannery O'Connor, and Homesick for Another World is her Everything That Rises Must Converge or A Good Man is Hard to Find. The flesh is weak; the timber is crooked; people are cruel to each other, and stupid, and hurtful. But beauty comes from strange sources. And the dark energy surging through these stories is powerfully invigorating. We're in the hands of an author with a big mind, a big heart, blazing chops, and a political acuity that is needle-sharp. The needle hits the vein before we even feel the prick.
Un thriller espeluznante, hipnótico y divertido. Una primera novela poderosa, que cautiva y perturba al lector. La voz de Ottessa Moshfegh irrumpe con fuerza en las letras norteamericanas.

Recuerda este nombre: Eileen.

La Navidad ofrece muy poco a Eileen Dunlop, una chica modesta y perturbada atrapada entre su papel de cuidadora de un padre alcohólico y su empleo administrativo en Moorehead, un correccional de menores cargado de horrores cotidianos. Eileen templa sus tristes días con fantasías perversas y sueña con huir a una gran ciudad. Mientras tanto, llena sus noches con pequeños hurtos en la tienda local, espiando a Randy, un ingenuo y musculoso guardia del reformatorio, y limpiando los desastres que su padre deja en casa.

Cuando la brillante, guapa y alegre Rebecca Saint John hace su aparición como nueva directora educativa de Moorehead, Eileen es incapaz de resistirse a esa milagrosa e incipiente amistad. Pero en un giro digno de Hitchcock, el cariño de Eileen por Rebecca la convierte en cómplice de un crimen.

* Ganadora del prestigioso Premio PEN/Hemingway al mejor debut literario, nominado al Man Booker Prize 2016 y uno de los mejores libros del año.

* Elegida como una de las mejores novelistas jóvenes de Estados Unidos por la revista Granta.

Críticas:
«Si Jim Thompson se casara con Patricia Highsmith (imaginen el hogar) podrían haber conspirado juntos para imaginar algo como Eileen. Es más negra que el negro y fría como un témpano. Una narración brillante y terriblemente divertida.»
John Banville

«Una de las nuevas voces más virtuosas de los últimos años. Su prosa es asombrosa, ingeniosa y electrizante.»
Bustle

«Eileen es una obra extraordinaria, siempre oscura y sorprendente, por momentos desagradable y en ocasiones hilarante. Confíen en mí: nunca han leído algo remotamente parecido.»
Patrick Anderson, Washington Post

«Su protagonista es todo menos común: es vivaz y humana. Una novela cautivadora. Moshfegh escribe frases hermosas. Una tras otra se despliegan, juguetonas, escandalosas, inteligentes, morbosas, ingeniosas y mordaces.»
Lily King, New York Times Book Review

«Moshfegh trabaja como una maga que insta a la expectativa.»
Kevin Rabalais, The Sydney Morning Herald

«Eileen enciende la relación simbiótica entre el amor y el odio, la esperanza y el engaño, y, para el lector, entre la repulsión y el enganche absoluto.»
Boris Kachka, New York Magazine

«Una descendiente de Nathaniel Hawthorne y Raymond Carver, Moshfegh transforma el veneno en algo embriagador.»
Rivka Galchen

«Una novela de debut con un propósito macabro. Hay un radicalismo punk en su representación de una joven mujer tímida y, al mismo tiempo, grotesca y perversa.»
The New Yorker

«Una joven escritora que ya posee una visión muy perspicaz de los callejones más oscuros de la psique humana.»
Sam Sacks, Wall Street Journal

«La heroína de Moshfegh posee el fraseo hipnótico del Humbert Humbert de Lolita y la mirada sin párpados del Hannibal Lecter de El silencio de los corderos... Otessa Moshfegh es ya la next great thing de la literatura norteamericana. ¿Contrapartes en español? Sara Mesa, Mariana Enríquez o Elvira Navarro. Todas descendientes de hembras extrañas como Silvina Ocampo, Joy Williams y Sylvia Plath.»
Rodrigo Fresán, Vanity Fair

«Una primera novela oscuramente divertida. No te olvidarás fácilmente de Eileen, palabra de lector.»
Toni Hill, Librotea (El País)

El libro del que todo el mundo habla en Estados Unidos.
Una novela sobre la falta de ganas de levantarse de la cama.

«Puede que esta sea la mejor novela existencial escrita por un autor no francés.»
Kirkus

En Mi año de descanso y relajación, Ottessa Moshfegh hace de Manhattan el epicentro de una civilización, la del año 2000, dominada por la apatía. Como una oscura bella durmiente, la narradora de esta novela decide encerrarse durante un año en su piso de una de las zonas más exclusivas de Nueva York, asistida por una herencia ingente y por una gran cantidad de fármacos, para dedicarse a dormir y ver películas de Whoopi Goldberg y Harrison Ford. El inicio de un siglo supuestamente trepidante encuentra a nuestra protagonista durmiendo en el sofá con la tele encendida. Con mucho cinismo, series, películas comerciales y narcóticos, y a costa de cortar todo vínculo humano, cualquiera puede sobrellevar esta vida. Ahora bien, ¿lo que queremos es sobrellevarla?

«Como esta es una novela escrita por Moshfegh, que va sobrada de talento, sabemos de antemano que va a ser una novela original y extraña. [...] Sus frases son penetrantes y viperinas.[...]Escribe con tal serenidad misantrópica que leerla siempre resulta un placer.»
The New York Times

La crítica ha dicho...
«En ocasiones es mejor dormir que vivir porque ¿quién es feliz realmente? Absolutamente nadie. Ottessa Moshfeg se ha enterado de todo y te ha escrito el mejor libro del año.»
Isa Calderón

«Uno de los mejores [libros] que hemos leído este año: irónico, divertido y en ocasiones doloroso, con una de las mejores últimas páginas jamás escritas. Moshfegh reflexiona sobre el sentido de la vida, la apatía y la amistad de una forma perversa. Pero es ante todo una novela sobre las preguntas de nuestro presente. ¿Es el pereza la única respuesta lógica al imperativo de productividad del capitalismo tardío? ¿Es la fatiga la figura fundamental de la condición millenial? Sí y sí, contesta Ottessa».
Directoras de la Fronde

«Tan refinado como perverso. [...] Un libro absorbente.»
The New Yorker

«Cuando nos recomiendan un libro normalmente preguntamos: "¿De qué trata?". Pero con este libro preguntamos: "¿De qué no trata?". Esta novela trata sobre el odio a una misma, el feminismo, la sexualidad, la salud mental, la familia, la industria farmacéutica... y ADEMÁS es la h*stia de divertida.»
Lena Dunham

«Ottessa Moshfegh es, posiblemente, la escritora americana actual más interesante a la hora de escribir sobre el asunto de estar vivo cuando estar vivo es una sensación terrible.»
The New Yorker

«Moshfegh deslumbra a la hora de crear ficción [...], como si fuera una maga haciendo sus mejores trucos sin atrezo ninguno.»
Literary Review

«Ingeniosa, oscura,cómica [...]. La novela se acelera hasta llegar a la que es probablemente la mejor última página que he leído nunca [...]. Mi año de descanso y relajación podría tornarse fácilmente en un thriller que te trastoca la memoria, o en una oscura odisea a través de los peligros de la industria farmacéutica, pero, sin embargo, Moshfegh se aferra a la premisa de una chica que está simple y llanamente perdida; un retrato perfecto de alguien que desea con desesperación echarse a dormir para, así, finalmente, sentirse despierta.»
Vice

«Electrizante [...].Moshfegh es una experta en la construcción de personajes femeninos cautivadores que transgreden las normas de la feminidad. [...] La protagonista es una revolucionaria inaudita.»
Vanity Fair

«Llenas de bravuconería y, aun así, siempre afiladas e irónicas, estas frases se acumulan con firmeza para construir el paisaje interior de esta novela. Todo esto es intencionadamente cómico (vaya que si lo es), pero no exactamente alegre, aunque por supuesto nos riamos.»
The Guardian

«El oído de Moshfegh sigue siendo tan despiadado como siempre. Como si de un Flaubert tardío se tratara, se recrea en la vanidad y la mediocridad y en las cimas absurdistas que ambas pueden alcanzar cuando la ocasión requiere de unas palabras sinceras.»
Harper ́s Magazine

«Puede que esta sea la mejor novela existencial no escrita por un autor francés [...]. Un relato abrumador sobre una rebelión moderna que no teme volverse oscuro o hallar humor en la oscuridad.»
Kirkus

«De esta novela oscura y desternillante no vas a salir necesariamente descansado ni relajado, pero sí con una mayor sintonía con lo delicada y frágil que puede ser la condición humana.»
Marie Claire

«Moshfegh oculta un tenue brillo de humanidad genuina bajo una gruesa capa de humor negro y cinismo de primer nivel [...]. Unos diálogos que son de los más divertidos que he leído en mucho tiempo y unas descripciones de personajes tan brutales y precisas que en realidad resultan encantadoras.»
The Stranger

«Divertida y despiadada, astuta, inteligente, muestra cómo muchos de nosotros llevamos vidas indolentes y alienadas aunque no nos hayamos convertido en reclusos narcotizados.»
Red

«Esta perspicaz nueva novela de Moshfegh es [...] un extraño y conmovedor relato sobre la angustia existencial.»
Mail on Sunday

«Puede que esta sea la mejor novela existencial no escrita por un autor francés [...]. Un relato abrumador sobre una rebelión moderna que no teme volverse oscuro o hallar humor en la oscuridad.»
Kirkus

»Ottessa Moshfegh är utan jämförelse vår tids mest intressanta amerikanska författare.« The New Yorker

Hon har allt. Hon är ung, snygg, smal, hon är nyutexaminerad från Columbia, lever på ett stort arv och har en lägenhet på Manhattan. I New York år 2000 står den moderna världen på sin absoluta topp, allt är tillgängligt, och det gäller att utnyttja dygnets timmar till max. Att sova, i stället för att arbeta eller njuta, betraktas som svaghet. Men samtidigt skrivs sömntabletter ut som godis.
Då bestämmer hon sig - efter att ha fått sparken för sina timslånga tupplurar på jobbet - för att sova bort ett helt år. Kanske är kemisk dvala den enda utvägen ur en speedad samtid? En sak är säker: hennes psykiatriker hjälper gärna till.
Ett år av vila & avkoppling är en skruvad sedeskildring, en undersökning av dygd och och moral i en tid när allt är tillåtet men ingen frihet finns.

OTTESSA MOSHFEGH är en amerikansk författare från New England. Hennes första roman, Eileen, hyllades unisont i pressen, vann en PEN Hemingway Award i kategorin »Bästa debutroman« och nominerades till både Man Booker Prize och National Book Critics Circle Award. Ett år av vila & avkoppling [My Year of Rest & Relaxation, 2018] - Ottessa Moshfeghs senaste roman - valdes till en av årets bästa böcker av New York Times.

»Ottessa Moshfegh visar på två motstridiga rörelser: livets fula tristess och de drastiska försöken att undkomma den. Och den gnistrande litteratur som kan uppstå där emellan.« Johanna Frid, Dagens Nyheter
»Originell, modig, mästerlig.« | The Guardian

Nominerad till 2016 års Man Booker Prize!

Det är inte mycket med julen som gör Eileen Dunlop särskilt glad. Hon är en försynt men djupt bekymrad ung kvinna fångad mellan rollen som sin alkoholiserade pappas vårdare och ett dagjobb som sekreterare på Moorehead, ett ungdomsfängelse för pojkar, fullt av sina egna vardagliga fasor.
Eileen håller på att förtäras av bitterhet och självförakt, och kompenserar sina dystra dagar med perversa fantasier och drömmar om att fly till storstaden. Samtidigt fyller hon sina nätter och helger med snattande och med att förfölja en fängelsevakt vid namn Randy.
När den smarta, snygga och gladlynta Rebecca Saint John dyker upp som Mooreheads nya kurator blir Eileen hänförd och lyckas inte motstå det som till en början framstår som en mirakulös, knoppande vänskap. I en Hitchcockartad vändning drar hennes tillgivenhet för Rebecca slutligen in henne i ett brott som går bortom hennes vildaste föreställningar.

OTTESSA MOSHFEGH är en amerikansk författare från New England, vars noveller har publicerats i The Paris Review och The New Yorker och för vilka hon fått flera priser. Eileen är hennes första roman, som hyllats unisont i den engelskspråkiga pressen. Boken har vunnit en PEN/Hemingway Award i kategorin »Bästa debutroman« och nominerats till både Man Booker Prize och National Book Critics Circle Award.

»En häpnadsväckande roman, raktigenom mörk och överraskande, stundtals ful och ibland hysteriskt rolig. Dess berättare är en av de underligaste, mest störda, mest patetiska - och ändå, på hennes eget oefterhärmeliga sätt, charmiga - misfits jag stött på i litteraturen. Tro mig, du har aldrig läst något som är ens i närheten av Eileen.« | Washington Post
Sărbătoarea Crăciunului în New England e un motiv de prea puțină B E S T S E L L E R I N T E R N A Ţ I O N A L bucurie pentru Eileen Dunlop, o tânără modestă și introvertită, prinsă între slujba de secretară la Moorehead, o închisoare pentru băieți, cu ororile sale cotidiene, și rolul de îngrijitoare a tatălui ei alcoolic, într-o casă mizeră. Chinuită de resentimente și de dezgust față de sine, Eileen își petrece zilele mohorâte fantazând să scape din micul orășel de provincie în care se simte captivă. Nopțile și weekendurile le dedică unor furturi mărunte din magazine, urmăririi unui gardian pe nume Randy, pentru care a făcut o mică pasiune perversă, și curățeniei după tatăl ei. Când Rebecca Saint John vine în calitate de consilier psihologic la Moorehead, Eileen este fermecată
și se dovedește incapabilă să reziste la ceea ce, la început, pare a fi o prietenie miraculoasă. Afecțiunea ei față de Rebecca o face însă complice la o infracțiune care îi depășește chiar și cele mai violente fantezii. Teribilă, fascinantă și amuzantă, această memorabilă carte de debut captivează și șochează, aducând în prim-plan una dintre cele mai originale voci noi în literatura contemporană. „Eileen este un roman remarcabil, întunecat și surprinzător, pe alocuri dezagreabil și uneori hilar. Naratoarea cărții e una dintre cele mai ciudate, mai debusolate și mai jalnice inadaptate pe care le-am întâlnit în ficțiune – și totuși, în felul ei inimitabil, adorabilă. Credeți-mă, n-ați citit niciodată nimic care să se compare cu Eileen.“
Entertainment Weekly’s #1 Book of 2018

“One of the most compelling protagonists modern fiction has offered in years: a loopy, quietly furious pillhead whose Ambien ramblings and Xanaxed b*tcheries somehow wend their way through sad and funny and strange toward something genuinely profound.”
— Entertainment Weekly 

From one of our boldest, most celebrated new literary voices, a novel about a young woman's efforts to duck the ills of the world by embarking on an extended hibernation with the help of one of the worst psychiatrists in the annals of literature and the battery of medicines she prescribes.

Our narrator should be happy, shouldn't she? She's young, thin, pretty, a recent Columbia graduate, works an easy job at a hip art gallery, lives in an apartment on the Upper East Side of Manhattan paid for, like the rest of her needs, by her inheritance. But there is a dark and vacuous hole in her heart, and it isn't just the loss of her parents, or the way her Wall Street boyfriend treats her, or her sadomasochistic relationship with her best friend, Reva. It's the year 2000 in a city aglitter with wealth and possibility; what could be so terribly wrong?

My Year of Rest and Relaxation is a powerful answer to that question. Through the story of a year spent under the influence of a truly mad combination of drugs designed to heal our heroine from her alienation from this world, Moshfegh shows us how reasonable, even necessary, alienation can be. Both tender and blackly funny, merciless and compassionate, it is a showcase for the gifts of one of our major writers working at the height of her powers.

Named a Best Book of the Year by: 
The Washington Post, Time, NPR, Amazon,Vice, Bustle, The New York Times, The Guardian, Kirkus Reviews, Entertainment Weekly, The AV Club, & Audible
A lonely young woman working in a boys' prison outside Boston in the early 60s is pulled into a very strange crime, in a mordant, harrowing story of obsession and suspense, by one of the brightest new voices in fiction So here we are. My name was Eileen Dunlop. Now you know me. I was twenty-four years old then, and had a job that paid fifty-seven dollars a week as a kind of secretary at a private juvenile correctional facility for teenage boys. I think of it now as what it really was for all intents and purposes-a prison for boys. I will call it Moorehead. Delvin Moorehead was a terrible landlord I had years later, and so to use his name for such a place feels appropriate. In a week, I would run away from home and never go back. This is the story of how I disappeared. The Christmas season offers little cheer for Eileen Dunlop, an unassuming yet disturbed young woman trapped between her role as her alcoholic father's caretaker in a home whose squalor is the talk of the neighborhood and a day job as a secretary at the boys' prison, filled with its own quotidian horrors. Consumed by resentment and self-loathing, Eileen tempers her dreary days with perverse fantasies and dreams of escaping to the big city. In the meantime, she fills her nights and weekends with shoplifting, stalking a buff prison guard named Randy, and cleaning up her increasingly deranged father's messes. When the bright, beautiful, and cheery Rebecca Saint John arrives on the scene as the new counselor at Moorehead, Eileen is enchanted and proves unable to resist what appears at first to be a miraculously budding friendship. In a Hitchcockian twist, her affection for Rebecca ultimately pulls her into complicity in a crime that surpasses her wildest imaginings. Played out against the snowy landscape of coastal New England in the days leading up to Christmas, young Eileen's story is told from the gimlet-eyed perspective of the now much older narrator. Creepy, mesmerizing, and sublimely funny, in the tradition of Shirley Jackson and early Vladimir Nabokov, this powerful debut novel enthralls and shocks, and introduces one of the most original new voices in contemporary literature.
An electrifying first collection from one of the most exciting short story writers of our time "What distinguishes Ottessa Moshfegh's writing is that unnamable quality that makes a new writer's voice, against all odds and the deadening surround of lyrical postures, sound unique." -Jeffrey Eugenides, in judges' citation for The Paris Review's Plimpton Prize for Fiction. Ottessa Moshfegh's debut novel Eileen was one of the literary events of 2015. Garlanded with critical acclaim, it was named a book of the year by The Washington Post and the San Francisco Chronicle, selected as a BEA Buzz pick, and nominated for a National Book Critics Circle Award. But as many critics noted, Moshfegh is particularly held in awe for her short stories. Homesick for Another World is the rare case where an author's short story collection is if anything more anticipated than her novel. And for good reason. There's something eerily unsettling about Ottessa Moshfegh's stories, something almost dangerous, while also being delightful, and even laugh-out-loud funny. Her characters are all unsteady on their feet in one way or another; they all yearn for connection and betterment, though each in very different ways, but they are often tripped up by their own baser impulses and existential insecurities. Homesick for Another World is a master class in the varieties of self-deception across the gamut of individuals representing the human condition. But part of the unique quality of her voice, the Moshfeghian experience, is the way the grotesque and the outrageous are infused with tenderness and compassion. Moshfegh is our Flannery O'Connor, and Homesick for Another World is her Everything That Rises Must Converge or A Good Man Is Hard to Find. The flesh is weak; the timber is crooked; people are cruel to each other, and stupid, and hurtful. But beauty comes from strange sources. And the dark energy surging through these stories is powerfully invigorating. We're in the hands of an author with a big mind, a big heart, blazing chops, and a political acuity that is needle-sharp. The needle hits the vein before we even feel the prick.
From one of our most ceaselessly provocative literary talents, a novel of haunting metaphysical suspense about an elderly widow whose life is upturned when she finds a cryptic note on a walk in the woods that ultimately makes her question everything about her new home

While on her normal daily walk with her dog in the nearby forest woods, our protagonist comes across a note, handwritten and carefully pinned to the ground with a frame of stones. Her name was Magda. Nobody will ever know who killed her. It wasn't me. Here is her dead body. Our narrator is deeply shaken; she has no idea what to make of this. She is new to this area, having moved here from her longtime home after the death of her husband, and she knows very few people. And she's a little shaky even on her best days. Her brooding about this note quickly grows into a full-blown obsession, and she begins to devote herself to exploring the possibilities of her conjectures about who this woman was and how she met her fate. Her suppositions begin to find echoes in the real world, and with mounting excitement and dread, the fog of mystery starts to form into a concrete and menacing shape. But as we follow her in her investigation, strange dissonances start to accrue, and our faith in her grip on reality weakens, until finally, just as she seems to be facing some of the darkness in her own past with her late husband, we are forced to face the prospect that there is either a more innocent explanation for all this or a much more sinister one--one that strikes closer to home.

A triumphant blend of horror, suspense, and pitch-black comedy, Death in Her Hands asks us to consider how the stories we tell ourselves both guide us closer to the truth and keep us at bay from it. Once again, we are in the hands of a narrator whose unreliability is well earned, only this time the stakes have never been higher.
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