It is 1998, the year in which America is whipped into a frenzy of prurience by the impeachment of a president, and in a small New England town, an aging classics professor, Coleman Silk, is forced to retire when his colleagues decree that he is a racist. The charge is a lie, but the real truth about Silk would have astonished his most virulent accuser. Coleman Silk has a secret. But it's not the secret of his affair, at seventy-one, with Faunia Farley, a woman half his age with a savagely wrecked past--a part-time farmhand and a janitor at the college where, until recently, he was the powerful dean of faculty. And it's not the secret of Coleman's alleged racism, which provoked the college witch-hunt that cost him his job and, to his mind, killed his wife. Nor is it the secret of misogyny, despite the best efforts of his ambitious young colleague, Professor Delphine Roux, to expose him as a fiend. Coleman's secret has been kept for fifty years: from his wife, his four children, his colleagues, and his friends, including the writer Nathan Zuckerman, who sets out to understand how this eminent, upright man, esteemed as an educator for nearly all his life, had fabricated his identity and how that cannily controlled life came unraveled. Set in 1990s America, where conflicting moralities and ideological divisions are made manifest through public denunciation and rituals of purification, The Human Stain concludes Philip Roth's eloquent trilogy of postwar American lives that are as tragically determined by the nation's fate as by the "human stain" that so ineradicably marks human nature. This harrowing, deeply compassionate, and completely absorbing novel is a magnificent successor to his Vietnam-era novel, American Pastoral, and his McCarthy-era novel, I Married a Communist.
Winner of the Man Booker International Prize 2011

In the "stifling heat of equatorial Newark," a terrifying epidemic is raging, threatening the children of the New Jersey city with maiming, paralysis, lifelong disability, and even death. This is the startling theme of Philip Roth’s wrenching new book: a wartime polio epidemic in the summer of 1944 and the effect it has on a closely knit, family-oriented Newark community and its children.

At the center of Nemesis is a vigorous, dutiful twenty-three-year-old playground director, Bucky Cantor, a javelin thrower and weightlifter, who is devoted to his charges and disappointed with himself because his weak eyes have excluded him from serving in the war alongside his contemporaries. Focusing on Cantor’s dilemmas as polio begins to ravage his playground—and on the everyday realities he faces—Roth leads us through every inch of emotion such a pestilence can breed: the fear, the panic, the anger, the bewilderment, the suffering, and the pain.

Moving between the smoldering, malodorous streets of besieged Newark and Indian Hill, a pristine children’s summer camp high in the Poconos—whose "mountain air was purified of all contaminants"—Roth depicts a decent, energetic man with the best intentions struggling in his own private war against the epidemic. Roth is tenderly exact at every point about Cantor’s passage into personal disaster, and no less exact about the condition of childhood.

Through this story runs the dark questions that haunt all four of Roth’s late short novels, Everyman, Indignation, The Humbling, and now Nemesis: What kind of accidental choices fatally shape a life? How does the individual withstand the onslaught of circumstance?

The Counterlife is a novel unlike any that Philip Roth has written before, a book of astonishing 180-degree turns, a book of conflicting perspectives and points of view, and, by far, Roth's most radical work of fiction.

The Counterlife is about people enacting their dreams of renewal and escape, some of them going so far as to risk their lives to alter seemingly irreversible destinies. Every major character (and most of the minor ones) is investigating, debating, and arguing the possibility of remaking the future.
Illuminating these lives in transition and guiding us through all the landscapes, familiar and foreign, where these people are seeking self-transformation, is the mind of the novelist Nathan Zuckerman. His is the skeptical, enveloping intelligence that calculates the price that's paid in the struggle to change personal fortune and to reshape history.

Yet his is hardly the only voice. This is a novel in which speaking out with force and lucidity appears to be the imperative of every life. There is Henry, the forty-year-old New Jersey dentist, who risks a quintuple bypass operation in order to escape the coronary medication that renders him sexually impotent. There is Maria, the wellborn young Englishwoman, who invites the disdain of her family by marrying the American she knows will be lease acceptable in Gloucestershire. There is Lippmann, the Israeli settlement leader, who contends that "everything is possible for the Jew if only he does not give ground."

The action in The Counterlife ranges from a dentist's office in quiet suburban New Jersey to a genteel dining table in a tradition-bound English village, from a Christmas carol service in London's West End to a Sabbath evening celebration in a tiny desert settlement in Israel's occupied West Bank. Wherever they may find themselves, the characters of The Counterlife are tempted unceasingly by the prospect of an alternative existence that can reverse their fate.

The Counterlife was a finalist for the National Book Award and winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award.

David Kepesh is white-haired and over sixty, an eminent TV culture critic and star lecturer at a New York college, when he meets Consuela Castillo, a decorous, well-mannered student of twenty-four, the daughter of wealthy Cuban exiles, who promptly puts his life into erotic disorder.
Since the sexual revolution of the 1960s, when he left his wife and child, Kepesh has experimented with living what he calls an "emancipated manhood," beyond the reach of family or a mate. Over the years he has refined that exuberant decade of protest and license into an orderly life in which he is both unimpeded in the world of eros and studiously devoted to his aesthetic pursuits. But the youth and beauty of Consuela, "a masterpiece of volupté" undo him completely, and a maddening sexual possessiveness transports him to the depths of deforming jealousy. The carefree erotic adventure evolves, over eight years, into a story of grim loss.
What is astonishing is how much of America’s post-sixties sexual landscape is encompassed in THE DYING ANIMAL. Once again, with unmatched facility, Philip Roth entangles the fate of his characters with the social forces that shape our daily lives. And there is no character who can tell us more about the way we live with desire now than David Kepesh, whose previous incarnations as a sexual being were chronicled by Roth in THE BREAST and THE PROFESSOR OF DESIRE.
A work of passionate immediacy as well as a striking exploration of attachment and freedom, THE DYING ANIMAL is intellectually bold, forcefully candid, wholly of our time, and utterly without precedent--a story of sexual discovery told about himself by a man of seventy, a story about the power of eros and the fact of death.
Against the backdrop of the Korean War, a young man faces life’s unimagined chances and terrifying consequences.

It is 1951 in America, the second year of the Korean War. A studious, law-abiding, intense youngster from Newark, New Jersey, Marcus Messner, is beginning his sophomore year on the pastoral, conservative campus of Ohio’s Winesburg College. And why is he there and not at the local college in Newark where he originally enrolled? Because his father, the sturdy, hard-working neighborhood butcher, seems to have gone mad -- mad with fear and apprehension of the dangers of adult life, the dangers of the world, the dangers he sees in every corner for his beloved boy.

As the long-suffering, desperately harassed mother tells her son, the father’s fear arises from love and pride. Perhaps, but it produces too much anger in Marcus for him to endure living with his parents any longer. He leaves them and, far from Newark, in the midwestern college, has to find his way amid the customs and constrictions of another American world.

Indignation, Philip Roth’s twenty-ninth book, is a story of inexperience, foolishness, intellectual resistance, sexual discovery, courage, and error. It is a story told with all the inventive energy and wit Roth has at his command, at once a startling departure from the haunted narratives of old age and experience in his recent books and a powerful addition to his investigations of the impact of American history on the life of the vulnerable individual.
Like Rip Van Winkle returning to his hometown to find that all has changed, Nathan Zuckerman comes back to New York, the city he left eleven years before. Alone on his New England mountain, Zuckerman has been nothing but a writer: no voices, no media, no terrorist threats, no women, no news, no tasks other than his work and the enduring of old age.

Walking the streets like a revenant, he quickly makes three connections that explode his carefully protected solitude. One is with a young couple with whom, in a rash moment, he offers to swap homes. They will flee post-9/11 Manhattan for his country refuge, and he will return to city life. But from the time he meets them, Zuckerman also wants to swap his solitude for the erotic challenge of the young woman, Jamie, whose allure draws him back to all that he thought he had left behind: intimacy, the vibrant play of heart and body.

The second connection is with a figure from Zuckerman’s youth, Amy Bellette, companion and muse to Zuckerman’s first literary hero, E. I. Lonoff. The once irresistible Amy is now an old woman depleted by illness, guarding the memory of that grandly austere American writer who showed Nathan the solitary path to a writing vocation.

The third connection is with Lonoff’s would-be biographer, a young literary hound who will do and say nearly anything to get to Lonoff’s “great secret.” Suddenly involved, as he never wanted or intended to be involved again, with love, mourning, desire, and animosity, Zuckerman plays out an interior drama of vivid and poignant possibilities.

Haunted by Roth’s earlier work The Ghost Writer, Exit Ghost is an amazing leap into yet another phase in this great writer’s insatiable commitment to fiction.
Philip Roth's The Professor of Desire is the story of an adventurous man of intelligence and feeling trying to make his way to both pleasure and dignity through a world of sensual possibilities. Temptation comes to him in both ordinary and spectacular forms, and the novel charts the history of his desire from the early years, when he accedes to it totally, to the time when he attempts to domesticate his passions (and his wife's) and finally to that most surprising moment when desire ebbs and, frighteningly, seems on the brink of disappearance. The book explores, in all its painful ramifications, the pursuit and loss of erotic happiness.

Among the variety of places that comprise this world of sensual possibilities are the mountaintop resort hotel where David Kepesh spends his boyhood, the college in upstate New York where he begins life as a passionate man by describing himself to coeds he hopes to seduce with Lord Byron's dictum, "studious by day, dissolute by night"; a basement flat in London, where he lives with two Swedish girls, one of whom he even thinks fleetingly of turning into a prostitute. Drawing back from all that he comes to recognize as dangerous in himself, he takes up a serious, responsible vocation--as a professor of literature--but then, later, in California, takes up with Helen Baird, a young woman in flight from her own adventurous years in the Far East, which culminated in a narrowly aborted murder plot against her lover's wife. David marries this woman whom he thinks of as a "heroine," courageous in her sensual abandon as well as in her renunciations. The marriage, always at cross purposes, ends in disaster. Back now in New York City, Kepesh falls into a state of spiritual despair and physical impotence over the unhappiness he has caused himself and others. In his small sublet apartment he entertains his aging parents, who are puzzled by the course their only son's personal life has taken. While a persistent homosexual stranger conducts a ridiculous siege outside the door, and a champion womanizer attempts to reconvert him to satyrism, David himself wonders about his future as a lover of anyone. Then he meets Claire Ovington, a loving and orderly young teacher, "the most extraordinary ordinary person I've ever met." While in Europe on a romantic holiday, they travel to Kafka's grave in Prague, and afterwards, asleep in his mistress's arms, David dreams of a bizarre encounter with "Kafka's whore."

Finally, in a rented Catskill house not far from the resort hotel where he was raised, David and Claire spend an idyllic summer, seemingly blessed by permanence and love. Kepesh's widowed father arrives for Labor Day weekend, with his friend, a concentration-camp survivor who has become old Mr. Kepesh's dearest companion. Their presence reinforces David's growing sense of the fragility of all existence, and in the last third of this novel--in a long conclusion that may be as moving as anything in contemporary fiction--Roth brings together all the strands of Kepesh's story in final scenes that are distinguished by an incomparably elegiac tone.

Sólo el sexo y el fulgor de la belleza sirven para luchar contra el destino.

Una de las novelas más penetrantes y abrasivas de Philip Roth, llevada a la gran pantalla por Isabel Coixet.

«No importa cuánto sepas, no importa cuánto pienses, no importa cuánto maquines, finjas y planees, no estás por encima del sexo.»

Así habla David Kepesh, reputado crítico cultural, profesor estrella de una universidad neoyorquina y también elocuente defensor de la revolución sexual. Hace décadas que se ha acostumbrado a acostarse con alumnas y a la vez mantener la distancia crítica de un esteta. Pero ahora esa distancia ha sido aniquilada.

La responsable del desmoronamiento de Kepesh es Consuelo Castillo, una mujer de veinticuatro años, hija de ricos exiliados cubanos, de modales refinados y humillantemente bella. Cuando Kepesh, de sesenta y dos, la convierte en su nueva conquista, se ve arrastrado inesperadamente al oscuro lodazal de los celos y el miedo a perderla.

En el retrato de esta caída, Philip Roth demuestra una extraordinaria versatilidad al explorar temas como la sexualidad y la muerte, el libertinaje y la represión, el egoísmo y el sacrificio. El animal moribundo es un libro abrasivo, lleno de fuego intelectual y no exento de peligros.

La crítica ha dicho...
«Una pequeña y perturbadora obra maestra.»
David Lodge, The New York Review of Books

«La mejor novela que he leído en todo el año. Rica, compleja, inmensamente provocadora.»
John Preston, The Sunday Telegraph

El sueño americano se tambalea peligrosamente.

Un audiolibro que nos lleva a las profundidades de la pirotecnia social norteamericana a través de la escritura veloz y magistral de Philip Roth.

En el verano de 1998, el doble azote del puritanismo y la corrección política recorre Estados Unidos a causa del escándalo Lewinski.

Coleman Silk, un viejo catedrático de una pequeña universidad de Nueva Inglaterra, se ve obligado a jubilarse cuando sus colegas lo acusan de racista. Lo asombroso del dictamen es que la verdad sobre Silk podría acallar hasta al más virulento de sus detractores. Su secreto, escondido durante cincuenta años a esposa, familiares y amigos, servirá al escritor Nathan Zuckerman para reconstruir la biografía desconocida de Silk y entender cómo puede llegar a desenmarañarse una ficción de vida tan ingeniosamente armada.

Las mejores novelas de Philip Roth, también disponibles en formato audiolibro.

La crítica ha dicho...
«Probablemente la mejor obra de su carrera. Una tragedia moderna.»
Chicago Sun-Times

«En la literatura americana actual, está Philip Roth y, luego, todos los demás.»
Chicago Tribune

«Es una maravillosa historia donde coexisten el coraje y la decadencia, la mentira y el pundonor, la necesidad y el fracaso.»
José María Guelbenzu, Babelia

«Roth está aquí en el apogeo de sus habilidades creativas.»
Publishers Weekly

«La mancha humana es un libro fascinante y a menudo hermoso.»
Lorrie Moore, The New York Times Book Review

«Una maravilla de empatía creativa, generosidad y tacto.»
Kirkus Reviews

« La mancha humana participa de las mejores virtudes de la narrativa norteamericana.»
Darío Villanueva, El Cultural

Escucha ahora esta novela extraordinaria en la que Philip Roth vuelve a sorprendernos a través de una epidemia.

En el «calor sofocante de la Newark ecuatorial» una espantosa epidemia causa estragos y amenaza con dejar a los niños de la ciudad de Nueva Jersey mutilados, paralizados o minusválidos, e incluso con matarlos. Este es el sorprendente tema de la nueva y desgarradora obra de Roth: una epidemia de polio que tiene lugar en un tiempo de guerra, el verano de 1944, y sus efectos sobre la comunidad de Newark, regida por la cohesión y los valores de la familia, y sobre sus niños.

El protagonista de Némesis es Bucky Cantor, un joven responsable de las actividades al aire libre de los alumnos de una escuela, que vive volcado en ellos y frustrado por no haber podido ir a la guerra con sus coetáneos a causa de un defecto de visión. Cuando la polio empieza a asolar el patio de recreo, Roth se concentra en los dilemas de Cantor y en las emociones que una epidemia semejante puede engendrar: el miedo, la cólera, el desconcierto, el sufrimiento y el dolor

En esta novela, ahora disponible en formato audiolibro, volvemos a encontrar el sombrío interrogante que recorre las últimas cuatro novelas de Roth, Elegía, Indignación, La humillación y ahora Némesis: ¿qué decisiones determinan fatalmente la vida? ¿Hasta qué punto somos impotentes ante las circunstancias? Escúchala ahora.

Reseñas:
«Perfectamente construida y con un audaz giro al final.»
J. M. Coetzee

«La novela de Roth tiene la elegancia de una fábula y la inevitable dosis trágica de un drama griego.»
The New Yorker

Sólo el sexo y el fulgor de la belleza sirven para luchar contra el destino.

Ya puedes escuchar una de las novelas más penetrantes y abrasivas de Philip Roth, llevada a la gran pantalla por Isabel Coixet.

«No importa cuánto sepas, no importa cuánto pienses, no importa cuánto maquines, finjas y planees, no estás por encima del sexo.»

Así habla David Kepesh, reputado crítico cultural, profesor estrella de una universidad neoyorquina y también elocuente defensor de la revolución sexual. Hace décadas que se ha acostumbrado a acostarse con alumnas y a la vez mantener la distancia crítica de un esteta. Pero ahora esa distancia ha sido aniquilada.

La responsable del desmoronamiento de Kepesh es Consuelo Castillo, una mujer de veinticuatro años, hija de ricos exiliados cubanos, de modales refinados y humillantemente bella. Cuando Kepesh, de sesenta y dos, la convierte en su nueva conquista, se ve arrastrado inesperadamente al oscuro lodazal de los celos y el miedo a perderla.

En el retrato de esta caída, Philip Roth demuestra una extraordinaria versatilidad al explorar temas como la sexualidad y la muerte, el libertinaje y la represión, el egoísmo y el sacrificio. El animal moribundo es un libro abrasivo, lleno de fuego intelectual y no exento de peligros.

Ahora puedes escuchar esta historia en audiolibro.

La crítica ha dicho...
«Una pequeña y perturbadora obra maestra.»
David Lodge, The New York Review of Books

«La mejor novela que he leído en todo el año. Rica, compleja, inmensamente provocadora.»
John Preston, The Sunday Telegraph

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