Beloved as a writer of exciting biographies and renowned for his philanthropic essays on almost any subject possible, Plutarch created a diverse range of works that have entertained generations of readers since the days of Imperial Rome. Delphi's Ancient Classics series provides eReaders with the wisdom of the Classical world, with both English translations and the original Greek texts. This comprehensive eBook presents the complete works of Plutarch, with beautiful illustrations, informative introductions and the usual Delphi bonus material. (Version 1)

* Beautifully illustrated with images relating to Plutarch's life and works
* Features the complete works of Plutarch, in both English translation and the original Greek
* Concise introductions to the works
* Provides the complete PARALLEL LIVES and the complete extant essays of MORALIA, for the first time in digital printing
* Includes many translations previously appearing in Loeb Classical Library editions of Plutarch's works
* Excellent formatting of the texts
* Easily locate the biographies and treatises you want to read with individual contents tables
* Features two bonus biographies - discover Plutarch's ancient world
* Scholarly ordering of texts into chronological order and literary genres

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CONTENTS:

The Translations
PARALLEL LIVES
MORALIA

The Greek Texts
LIST OF GREEK TEXTS

The Biographies
INTRODUCTION TO PLUTARCH by Bernadotte Perrin
LIFE OF PLUTARCH by Aubrey Stewart

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Lycurgus, Pericles, Solon, Nicias, Themistocles, Alcibiades, Cimon, Agesilaus, Alexander `I treat the narrative of the Lives as a kind of mirror...The experience is like nothing so much as spending time in their company and living with them: I receive and welcome each of them in turn as my guest.' In the nine lives of this collection Plutarch introduces the reader to the major figures and periods of classical Greece. He portrays virtues to be emulated and vices to be avoided, but his purpose is also implicitly to educate and warn those in his own day who wielded power. In prose that is rich, elegant and sprinkled with learned references, he explores with an extraordinary degree of insight the interplay of character and political action. While drawing chiefly on historical sources, he brings to biography a natural story-teller's ear for a good anecdote. Throughout the ages Plutarch's Lives have been valued for their historical value and their charm. This new translation will introduce new generations to his urbane erudition. The most comprehensive selection available, it is accompanied by a lucid introduction, explanatory notes, bibliographies, maps and indexes. ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.
Marcus Cato Sulla Aemilius Paullus Pompey The Gracchi Marius Julius Caesar Anthony 'I treat the narrative of the Lives as a kind of mirror...The experience is like nothing so much as spending time in their company and living with them: I receive and welcome each of them in turn as my guest.' In the eight lives of this collection Plutarch introduces the reader to the major figures and periods of classical Rome. He portrays virtues to be emulated and vices to be avoided, but his purpose is also implicitly to educate and warn those in his own day who wielded power. In prose that is rich, elegant and sprinkled with learned references, he explores with an extraordinary degree of insight the interplay of character and political action. While drawing chiefly on historical sources, he brings to biography a natural story-teller's ear for a good anecdote. Throughout the ages Plutarch's Lives have been valued for their historical value and their charm. This new translation will introduce new generations to his urbane erudition. The most comprehensive selection available, it is accompanied by a lucid introduction, explanatory notes, bibliographies, maps and indexes. ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.
Pythagoras lured, flattered, and controlled animals by the power of his voice, even a bean-eating ox! For he enjoyed the same dominion over nature as Orpheus, possessor of the phorminx, symbol of the sevenfold mystery of initiation.

He persuaded an ox to renounce eating beans by merely whispering in the animal’s ear, and a she-bear to give up eating human flesh. He also forced a white eagle to descend from the clouds, and subdued him by stroking him gently with the hand, and by talking to him.

The Samian Philosopher exhorted his disciples to abstain from beans on account of several different reasons. The rationale for this proscription is explained from eight different perspectives:

1. A physiological explanation: Fava beans produce flatulence, which is disturbing to those who seek mental calm, particularly before sleep.

2. A pathological explanation: Beans may cause acute haemolytic anaemia in genetically predisposed individuals.

3. A political explanation: The ban of beans was meant to curb the itch for power and profit associated with public office.

4. An unclean explanation: As beans were slang for testicles, Empedocles perpetuated their prohibition to temper sexual pursuits.

5. A mystical explanation: Aristotle believed that the reason for the ban is because beans bind souls to earth.

6. A biochemical explanation: The high nitrogen contents of beans makes their protein border on the animal kingdom.

7. An esoteric explanation: Their magnetism dulls the inner man and stifles the psychic man, says Blavatsky.

8. An etymological explanation: The name of the bean itself gives away the true reason for its notable ban by the Samian Master.

Truth is wiser than the wise. The antipathy that sometimes exists even among kindred substances is clearly demonstrated in the case of the Mexican pomegranate. Milo of Croton holds the pomegranate or matter tightly in one hand, while extending the other in prayer to the goddess of matter. The difference between the bells of the heathen worshippers, and the bells and pomegranates of the Jewish worship is also explained.

The old Athenians loved beans so much that they even worshipped a Bean-Man. But those initiated to the Eleusinian Mysteries were ordered to abstain from domestic birds, fishes, beans, pomegranates, and apples, says Porphyry.

Claims that Pythagoras was not a strict vegetarian are counterbalanced by Apollonius Tyanaeus:

Counterpoise 1. The story of the fishermen as retold by Porphyry suggests that Pythagoras absolutely abstained from fish.

Counterpoise 2. Eudoxus maintains that Pythagoras not only abstained from animal flesh, he also kept clear of butchers and hunters.

Counterpoise 3. Apollonius of Tyana, more Pythagorean than Pythagoras himself, has always maintained his purity by shunning animal flesh as well as animal clothing.

Counterpoise 4. Following Pythagoras’ example, Apollonius sacrificed a bull made out of frankincense.

Counterpoise 5. Noting that men and beans arose out of putrefaction, Pythagoras forbid the consumption of beans as well as of human flesh.

Counterpoise 6. Five centuries later, the Cappadocian Adept sternly rebuked the gladiatorial barbarities of the Athenians that were taking place in the Theatre of Dionysus Eleuthereus on the southern slope of their Acropolis.

Counterpoise 7. He provided evidence of the utter futility of human sacrifices and of cocks, pigs, and bulls being unworthy vehicles of divination.

The ban of beans is far older than Pythagoras, as evidenced by the Orphic Hymn to Earth, where the sacrificer is ordered to fumigate from every kind of seed, except beans and aromatics.

Alexander * Demosthenes * Phocion * Eumenes * Demetrius * Pyrrhus * Agis and Cleomenes * Aratus * Philopoemen * Flamininus This selection of ten Lives traces the history of Hellenistic Greece from the rise of Macedon and Alexander's conquest of the Persian empire to the arrival of the Romans. Plutarch's biographies of eminent politicians, rulers, and soldiers combine vivid portraits of their subjects with a wealth of historical information; they constitute a uniquely important source for the period. We see how Greek politics changed as Macedon's power grew, and we learn of the warlords who followed Alexander. Resistance to Macedon is reflected in the Lives of Demosthenes and Aratus, and that of Agis and Cleomenes, two revolutionary kings of Sparta. The volume concludes with the emergence of Rome in Greek affairs, and the life of Flamininus, the Roman general who defeated Philip V of Macedon. Plutarch's elegant style combines anecdote and erudition, humour and psychological insight, consummately translated by Robin Waterfield and introduced by Andrew Erskine. These Lives from the Hellenistic period complement Greek Lives and Roman Lives in Oxford World's Classics. ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.
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