Ebooks

Housing policy not only aff ects all Americans' quality of life, but has a direct impact on their fi nancial well being. About 70 percent of American households own their own homes, and for most, their homes represent the majority of their net worth. Renters are aff ected by housing policy. Even the small minority of Americans who are homeless are aff ected by housing policies specifi cally targeted to low-income individuals. The government's increasing involvement in housing markets, fed by popular demand that government "do something" to address real problems of mortgage defaults and loans, provides good reason to take a new look at the public sector in housing markets. Crises in prime mortgage lending may lower the cost of housing, but the poor and homeless cannot benefi t because of increases in unemployment. Even the private market is heavily regulated. Government policies dictate whether people can build new housing on their land, what type of housing they can build, the terms allowed in rental contracts, and much more. This volume considers the eff ects of government housing policies and what can be done to make them work better. It shows that many problems are the result of government rules and regulations. Even in a time of foreclosures, the market can still do a crucial a job of allocating resources, just as it does in other markets. Consequently, the appropriate policy response may well be to signifi cantly reduce, not increase, government presence in housing markets. Housing America is a courageous and comprehensive eff ort to examine housing policies in the United States and to show how such policies aff ect the housing market.
"This volume is based on a conference held in March 2000, at Florida State University in Tallahassee"--Pref. Includes bibliographical references and index. Machine generated contents note: 1. Land-Use Planning: An Overview of the Issues -- Randall G. Holcombe and Samuel R. Staley -- Public Concern About Sprawl -- The Issues -- The Political Response -- Market Mechanisms -- The Market Order -- Conclusion -- 2. An Overview of U.S. Urbanization and Land-Use Trends -- Samuel R. Staley -- How Developed Is the U.S.? -- What Land Is Urbanized? -- NRI Data Reliability -- Housing Preferences and Trends -- Conclusion -- 3. The Geography of Transportation and Land Use -- Peter Gordon and Harry W. Richardson -- Suburbanization -- Transportation Issues -- Conclusions -- 4. Congestion and Traffic Management -- Robert W. Poole, Jr. -- Road Pricing: The History of an Idea -- Resistance to Urban Road Pricing -- Rethinking Highway Finance -- Highway Finance Reform -- Equity Issues -- Can New Technology Make Pricing Feasible? -- A New Paradigm for Urban Roadways -- Getting from Here to There -- Conclusion -- 5. Air Quality, Density, and Environmental Degradation -- Kenneth Green -- Density and Air Quality -- Density and Water Quality -- Density and Soil Contamination -- Conclusion -- 6. National Land-Use Planning Through Environmental Policy -- Jefferson G. Edgens -- Nonpoint Source Water Pollution -- Ecosystem Protection Via Watershed Management -- EPA Authority Under the Clean Water Act -- Expanding the EPA's Nonstatutory Regulatory Control -- The EPA and Federal Growth Management -- American Heritage Rivers Initiative and -- the Gulf of Mexico Initiative -- EPA Authority Over Nonpoint Sources -- Guidelines for Policy -- Conclusion -- 7. Regionalism and the Growth Management Movement -- Gerard C S. Mildner -- The Development of Comprehensive Land-Use Planning -- Regional Planning and Fiscal Equity -- Land-Use Planning in Portland, Oregon -- Conclusion -- 8. Growth Management in Action: The Case of Florida -- Randall G. Holcombe -- Florida's 1985 Growth Management Act -- Concurrency -- Urban Sprawl -- Lessons from Florida's Urban Sprawl Policy -- Growth Management as Central Planning -- Planning for Private and Public Resources -- Planning for Transportation and Land-Use Patterns -- Impediments to Infrstructure Planning -- Conclusion -- 9. Urban Density and Sprawl: An Historic Perspective -- Robert Bruegmann -- Sprawl and Density -- Density A Compact History -- American Cities and European Cities -- Decentralization and Density Today -- Causes of Decentralization -- The Fight Against Low Density -- 10. Property Rights in a Complex World -- Roger E. Meiners and Andrew P. Morriss -- The Nature and Source of Property Rights -- Free Market Environmentalism -- Environmental Creativity -- Conclusion -- 11. Markets, Smart Growth, and the Limits of Policy -- Samuel R. Staley -- The Politics of Smart Growth and Growth Management -- Key Features of Smart Growth Plans -- Legislative Decisionmaking -- Bureaucratic Decisionmaking -- Market Decisionmaking -- Policy Implications -- 12. Infrastructure Provision in a Market-Oriented Framework -- Wendell Cox -- Where Should Infrastructure Be Provided? -- Improving Efficiency and Effectiveness: -- Competitive Service Provision -- Competitive Infrastructure Development -- Competitive Service Delivery (Competitive Contracting -- A Special Case: Roadways -- De-Politicizing Infrastructure -- Conclusions -- 13. Fixing the Dysfunctional Central City -- Steven Hayward -- 14. Policy Implications -- Randall G. Holcombe and Samuel R. Staley -- Urban Development -- Environmental Issues -- Transportation -- Land-Use Policy -- Policy for the Underprivileged, the Poor, and Minorities -- Conclusion -- References -- Index -- About the Editors and Contributors.
Housing policy not only aff ects all Americans' quality of life, but has a direct impact on their fi nancial well being. About 70 percent of American households own their own homes, and for most, their homes represent the majority of their net worth. Renters are aff ected by housing policy. Even the small minority of Americans who are homeless are aff ected by housing policies specifi cally targeted to low-income individuals.The government's increasing involvement in housing markets, fed by popular demand that government "do something" to address real problems of mortgage defaults and loans, provides good reason to take a new look at the public sector in housing markets. Crises in prime mortgage lending may lower the cost of housing, but the poor and homeless cannot benefi t because of increases in unemployment. Even the private market is heavily regulated. Government policies dictate whether people can build new housing on their land, what type of housing they can build, the terms allowed in rental contracts, and much more.This volume considers the eff ects of government housing policies and what can be done to make them work better. It shows that many problems are the result of government rules and regulations. Even in a time of foreclosures, the market can still do a crucial a job of allocating resources, just as it does in other markets. Consequently, the appropriate policy response may well be to signifi cantly reduce, not increase, government presence in housing markets. Housing America is a courageous and comprehensive eff ort to examine housing policies in the United States and to show how such policies aff ect the housing market.
©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.