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An enriching 20th - 21st century work of original philosophical fiction ideal for throwing some light on various philosophical concerns of the individual; encouraging group discussion and inviting scholarly exploration.

Innkeepers’ Fire is a keeper; a fascinating piece of literary art, best read as philosophy expressed through a poetic means all of its own delightful design. Some nineteen years in the making, the earliest section of the work dates from 1991 in Seoul, the Republic of Korea, to 1998 in Jeddah, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and to here in Ireland in 2008.

The work comes in two volumes: Volume I contains Acts 1-22 and Volume II, Acts 23-40. It is being presented as an opera of place rather than as a drama of place as the setting for each act and its performance may be said to resemble more that of an opera performance than that of a theatre. With just a slight movement of the imagination one can easily see, hear, feel and come to know this to be so for the voices, sounds and silences found therein are all simply music expressed in a particular rhythm, pitch, melody and harmony and in a style and deliverance all of its own wondrous composition.

The author has chosen a traditional Irish setting which is very close to his own heart, namely that of the convivial ambience of sitting around a cosy open hearth telling stories and then discussing them at length for half the night.

The work effectively communicates that it is an ongoing human obligation to think life in a new and different light. The flamboyancy and style of both the stories and their commentaries ensures a highly enjoyable and most rewarding encounter. Its profundity will at times bring tears to the eyes. While cryptic and esoteric elements are subtly and copiously scattered here and there throughout the text, they won’t in anyway distract from the reader’s enjoyment of the work, rather will instead be handsomely adding to their enjoyment of it. The work takes the position that there is nothing that isn’t mysteriously related to everything else in some way or another.

Innkeeper’s Fire is being presented as a landmark work in the tradition of clear independent Irish thought; in the tradition of spontaneous, independent, Irish philosophical speculation of the most natural and native kind. The ever-embering presence of this tradition has been softly glowing with us down through the ages in the treasured burial caverns, rock designs, artifacts, stories, poetry and writings of our gracious ancestors. Yet, there have been but brief memorable moments when this softly glowing embering was with the laying of well footed May-dried turf, spontaneously given to kindling itself into a passionately glowing fire in the hearth of Irish and global intellectual thought. Such a rare, beauteous and auspicious moment, like unto the appearance of a supernova in the heavens, the author sees as having last occurred in the welcoming, self-culturing mind of the 9th century independent Irish philosopher Iohannes Scottus Ériugena.

The fonts and page numbering in this ebook correspond to the 2008 hardback edition.

An enriching 1st - 21st century work of original philosophical fiction ideal for throwing some light on various philosophical concerns of the individual; encouraging group discussion and inviting scholarly exploration.

The author of A Jesus of Nazareth opens with telling us that of a fresh clear morning in the spring of 1997 he found himself sitting on a mound of sweet scented flowers and peacefully gazing over the ways at Lake Galilee in the distance, also known as Tabariyya, Tiberias and Gennesaret. And off to his left was the Hill of Nazareth, to the right the Golan Heights and below the Valley of Yarmouk. He was in Um Quais in northern Jordan. In biblical times it was known as Gadara. His family and he had driven there by car all the way from Jeddah. They had come on past Al-Madinah Al-Munawwarah and through the desert to the oasis city of Tebuk. From there they had headed for Aqaba and onwards to Petra, Yarmouk and finally Um Quais. It had been a roundtrip adventure of a lifetime.

He had at long last arrived in a place where Jesus had at least on one occasion visited and taught. (Matthew 8:28-34) And in that moment, he didn’t feel the need to go any farther. He didn’t feel the need to go over and stroll along the foot of the hill or walk along the shore of the lake. It was sufficient to remain right there where he was; right there where he was in happy contemplation in the light, the fragrancies and the view.

Nine springs hence were to find him north of Lake Galilee in the land of Mount Hermon. The melting snows on Hermon being the source of the river Jordan which in turn perpetually gives life anew to Lake Galilee. It felt good to be back, yet somehow he sensed it to be the end of an era for him; the end of a search for the Jesus of his younger days. This Jesus had been alive for him in his reflective readings of the gospels. Now, however and for some time he was saddened and bothered that Jesus’s legacy, yet, not alone his, but also the legacies of those more ancient and recent than his and being of a similar vein and intensity in word and deed had caused and were continuing to cause so much hardship and pain to so many and for so long too in just about every part of the world they had touched. And he contemplated the future.

It was becoming clearer to him that Jesus’s life and message, though certainly admirable in many respects and also as it had been genuinely lived by a certain few down through the centuries, was of and in itself fundamentally consistent in its inability to contemporaneously usher in and sustain a harmonious, dignified, honourable and joyous way of life for everyone on the planet. Surely, two millennia had been more than an adequate length of time he thought to himself in which to have had accomplished such a worthy and elementary assignment. 

On the morning of the 8th April 2006 as he gazed back at the beautiful hazy Lebanese shoreline from the airline, he knew the time had come for him to write of a Jesus of his own philosophical heartland; a Jesus of his own self making.

As will immediately become apparent to the reader, A Jesus of Nazareth is not intended to be read as one would read a novel or a short story but rather by passages, verses, lines or phrases, thus allowing one to contemplatively savour its nourishing subtleties and nuances. Frequently, it will be found that a given text will be significantly saying and implying as much in what it doesn’t say as in what it does. Moreover, for the attentive explorer, the integral, vast, hereabout primordial White Space Ocean will be discovered to be a world teeming with living speculations of many kinds.

The work readily encourages and lends itself to comparison and contrast with the Holy Bible, the Holy Qur’an and the Holy Tanakh as well as with the principal philosophical Taoist texts, namely the Tao Te Ching and The Chuang-Tzu.

A Jesus of Nazareth contains twenty-eight chapters, each having numbered verses. The Index is intended to serve as an ideal reference source in which topics of a specific interest to the reader are quickly introduced according to their first time appearance in a chapter. The primary structural paradigms used were that of The Gospel According to Saint Luke; The Books of Genesis, Exodus and Deutero-Isaiah and The Book of Psalms. While the primary English-language Bible model was that of Young's Literal Translation. And J. H. Breasted's translation of the Hymn to Aten was also used.

A necessary caveat respectfully to the reader: neither the Jesus of the Gospels nor the Isa (Arabic for Jesus) of the Qur’an exists here within no more; no more too the Jesus of such works as Kempis’ The Imitation of Christ, Loyola’s Spiritual Exercises, Gibran’s Jesus the Son of Man, Baigent, Leigh & Lincoln’s The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail or Brown’s The Da Vinci Code.

What is more, the Moses the recipient of the Torah exists here within no more; no more too the Moses leading to a Promised Land. Rather what exists here within is a Jesus and a Moses and a number of other memorable personages of the author’s own inspiration and who to his own heart are eminently credible, enjoyable and profound.

A Jesus of Nazareth according to the author closes the book for him on Jesus content in his writings. It is essentially a contemplative work written as it is to be interpreted both exoterically and esoterically; a work which attempts to restore to the bright: the light, the memory and the power of insight, dream and intuition.

The work traverses the lands we in modern times would refer to as the Arabian Peninsula, Egypt, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Palestine and Syria.

The fonts and page numbering in this ebook correspond to the 2007 hardback edition.

An enriching 21st century work of original philosophical fiction ideal for throwing some light on various philosophical concerns of the individual; encouraging group discussion and inviting scholarly exploration.

Profound reflections on a sampling of life’s eternal concerns. These treasured mythologies in the making of the town of Tallow and its surroundings date from the third to the eight month of the fourth year into this the 21st century. Tallow is situated off to the south of the River Bride in western county Waterford in the Province of Munster on the lovely island of Ireland. The mythologies came into being in response to concerns that were foremost on the author’s mind at the time. While many of these concerns are as old as humankind itself, some also tend to be more exclusive to the author’s own day. Representative concerns include, for instance, nostalgia for the past, forgotten civilizations, secrets of sacred grounds, items of love and affection, sincerity of profound people, visitors from beyond the clouds, source of conflict and its solution, ancestral connections and destinies, dealing with grand scale temptation, human behaviour that is beneath human dignity, well-intentioned actions and practices which turn out not to be so beneficial for nature. And there is a call to read between the lines: to seek white space knowledge.

Generations Reaching (like all the author’s works) is being presented as a time barque for the generations of our future, thence enabling them to know and to come to appreciate the reflections and aspirations that one of their ancestors had with respect to a sampling of life’s eternal concerns while happily living simply and plainly with his wife and two children in a 21st century of his era; happily living simply and plainly in a beautiful border village (poetically) that the people of his day called Tallow, on the lovely isle they called Éire, of the fragile planet they called Earth, of the solar system he called Garden, of the spiral galaxy they called Milky Way, of the thirty galaxies or more they called Local Group, of the beyond and beyond which he called Horizon, and of the that which they called Great Universe.

Tallow: (Gaeilge: Tulach an Iarainn)

The name Tallow wonderfully suggests the notion of life as consisting of highs and lows, ups and downs all-in-one like the Chinese yinyang concept of perfect harmony. In Gaeilge the name means the ‘hill concealing iron ore’ which symbolically the author has given it to mean: a sacred place of alchemy and transformation for those in search of the highest truths and values. And as the tallow of the candle faithfully supports and yields to the wick that gives light, warmth, and beauty to the household, so too does the natural surroundings of Tallow lovingly support and yield to its inhabitants, by offering them opportunities in the world to be enlightened in their intentions, profound in their words, and honourable in their actions.

The fonts and page numbering in this ebook correspond to the 2007 hardback edition.

An enriching 13th - 21st century work of original philosophical fiction ideal for throwing some light on various philosophical concerns of the individual; encouraging group discussion and inviting scholarly exploration.

Reader, have you ever wondered if Christian visionaries down through the centuries really saw what they claimed to have seen? This is the very question the two researchers in this twenty-first century thought-provoking work of realistic fiction long mulled over before definitively answering it; at least for themselves. What if one of them could go back in time they thought; back as it were to say thirteenth century Europe and there to be privy to the visions of a visionary. That is precisely what one of them did while the other remained in the present coordinating the visitation. He went back to see; to perceive what it was a certain visionary in the hill country of Illyria was seeing throughout his life. What they discovered was nothing short of astounding. You are hereby invited to come see and ponder for yourself their amazing visual discoveries. What bearing you will let them have on your own personal faith or ideas will be very much up to you to satisfactorily determine. But assuredly, if you are a Christian you will be brought face to face with a quandary: do these visual discoveries orientate me all the more towards Christ or all the more away from Christ; do they nurture to a greater level my faith, my hope and my love or not for my fellow human beings and for every living thing, however near or far they be in space and time?

The fonts and page numbering in this ebook correspond to the 2020 hardback edition.

An enriching 20th - 21st century work of original philosophical fiction ideal for throwing some light on various philosophical concerns of the individual; encouraging group discussion and inviting scholarly exploration.

In the introduction to Myriam of Lebanon the author says the following: “What greater honour can we bring to our teacher than to follow as closely as possible in his or her footsteps? In this way their spiritual fragrancy and intellectual refinement will always be us. My teacher among my teachers, Gibran Kahlil Gibran passed away seventy-five years ago this month. It was but last Friday, and I am saddened by the very thought of it. Only forty-eight, and in a hospital, and all alone too so far far away from his beloved hill country home of Bsharrī in Lebanon.”

The author continues: “I have been asking myself what can I do for my teacher that will give a life in continuity to his memory; a presence in my own day and a promise and a fulfilment for the future? The more I have thought about this, the more I have come to realise that it is not so much the memory of the man himself that I have to keep alive (for that is already well secured), but rather the light within the man and the way in which he cultured it to express profound insights into the mystery we call Life. This is what makes him my teacher, in that he teaches me a way among the myriad ways of how to let my light within to shine more wonderfully without.”

“For nigh on thirty years Gibran’s The Prophet,” he tell us, “has been with me. I have had it since my college days back on Éire [seminary days with the Missionary Society of St. Columban in Dalgan Park, county Meath] when I was first introduced to it while listening to a musical interpretation narrated by my fellow countryman the actor, singer and songwriter Richard Harris. It has been with me for my years of study and teaching in the Far East and the Middle East respectively. Whenever I have been in need of solace and inspiration, I have turned to it and found it to have a welcome for me.”

“Yet,” he says, “there was always something about it or perhaps even about me that prevented me somehow from experiencing its power at a deeper level. Strangely, it had at times the effect of even irritating me, and I would put it aside for days on end until it would call me back to again consider its words. I would then never be quite able to tell why it had irritated me so in the first place for now it would appear to be so profound and beautiful. I came to the conclusion that it must have something to do with me, for being an Irishman it is not easy to take being preached at, be it from the pulpit, podium or a text. There is something about our inherited makeup which makes it even more difficult for us to accept those who would talk ‘at’ us rather than those who would talk ‘with’ us. This aside, The Prophet has been my constant companion.” 

The work opens with: The Dawnsong Annunciation -  

“The Qadisha valley-spirit of Lubnan Mountain ever lives in inspiration; inspiration’s gateway being the issuer forth of ideas that nourish the needs of the times that be. Subtle she is almost like as if she were making no effort at all. Yet be she is most assuredly. Only those who lend themselves to patiently and reverently standing in dawns and twilights can begin to appreciate her profound generosity. Behold, hereupon is presented the Annunciation of the Qadisha valley-spirit of Lubnan Mountain, concerning Myriam the Beautiful; a fragrant scion from her upland groves. In this scroll herewith, it is written for all to read in refined contemplation, and joyful anticipation, a goodly and timely message.

My Myriam my Beloved, who is my dawn and my fulfilment unto her own day, had waited seven years in my city isle of Éirelese for her ship that was to return and bear her back to my Lebanon, my land of her birth. And in my seventh year, on my eight day of September, my month of reaping, she climbed my hill without my city walls and looked seaward; and she beheld her ship coming with my mist. Then my gates of her heart were flung open, and her joy flew far out over my sea. And she closed her eyes and prayed in my silences of her soul . . .”

These words express with a fine clarity the heart of the author’s vision of life: the image of an eternal universal ‘sentient’ spirit that becomes present to us ‘in particular places’ within our respective natural environments and cultures that we in our hearts may come to know ‘the Most Beloved’, and in this knowing to live accordingly with beauty in expression, freedom in thought and magnificence in work. In the same words, we get an idea of the eternal universal spirit’s presence in the world. Subtle she is almost like as if she weren’t even there. And also we are told that only those with a special kind of sensitivity can begin to appreciate her profound generosity. 

This unique work which is steadfastly established on Gibran Kahlil Gibran’s The Prophet was debuted by the author and warmly received at an International Conference on Gibran held in Beirut in April 2006. Given the state that the world is in today, the author is of the strong opinion that a woman’s word would be more effective in bringing about a qualitative change, and even more warmly received by peoples of the world, and of his native Ireland, than say a man’s, especially, if she were perceived by them to be in every way exceedingly beautiful. The work Myriam of Lebanon has been his answer. It presents a philosopher-poetess called Myriam from the Phoenician port city of Byblos of the land of Lebanon who visits the isle of Éire/Ireland and while there shares of her profound wisdom. This work is intended to be a bright beacon of hope and strength for our times and beyond; a beautiful and endearing work born of the green fields of Ireland and the snow-capped mountains of Lebanon.

The fonts and page numbering in this ebook correspond to the 2007 hardback edition.

An enriching 20th - 21st century work of original philosophical fiction ideal for throwing some light on various philosophical concerns of the individual; encouraging group discussion and inviting scholarly exploration.

Innkeepers’ Fire is a keeper; a fascinating piece of literary art, best read as philosophy expressed through a poetic means all of its own delightful design. Some nineteen years in the making, the earliest section of the work dates from 1991 in Seoul, the Republic of Korea, to 1998 in Jeddah, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and to here in Ireland in 2008.

The work comes in two volumes: Volume I contains Acts 1-22 and Volume II, Acts 23-40. It is being presented as an opera of place rather than as a drama of place as the setting for each act and its performance may be said to resemble more that of an opera performance than that of a theatre. With just a slight movement of the imagination one can easily see, hear, feel and come to know this to be so for the voices, sounds and silences found therein are all simply music expressed in a particular rhythm, pitch, melody and harmony and in a style and deliverance all of its own wondrous composition.

The author has chosen a traditional Irish setting which is very close to his own heart, namely that of the convivial ambience of sitting around a cosy open hearth telling stories and then discussing them at length for half the night.

The work effectively communicates that it is an ongoing human obligation to think life in a new and different light. The flamboyancy and style of both the stories and their commentaries ensures a highly enjoyable and most rewarding encounter. Its profundity will at times bring tears to the eyes. While cryptic and esoteric elements are subtly and copiously scattered here and there throughout the text, they won’t in anyway distract from the reader’s enjoyment of the work, rather will instead be handsomely adding to their enjoyment of it. The work takes the position that there is nothing that isn’t mysteriously related to everything else in some way or another.

Innkeeper’s Fire is being presented as a landmark work in the tradition of clear independent Irish thought; in the tradition of spontaneous, independent, Irish philosophical speculation of the most natural and native kind. The ever-embering presence of this tradition has been softly glowing with us down through the ages in the treasured burial caverns, rock designs, artifacts, stories, poetry and writings of our gracious ancestors. Yet, there have been but brief memorable moments when this softly glowing embering was with the laying of well footed May-dried turf, spontaneously given to kindling itself into a passionately glowing fire in the hearth of Irish and global intellectual thought. Such a rare, beauteous and auspicious moment, like unto the appearance of a supernova in the heavens, the author sees as having last occurred in the welcoming, self-culturing mind of the 9th century independent Irish philosopher Iohannes Scottus Ériugena.

The fonts and page numbering in this ebook correspond to the 2008 hardback edition.

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