A New York Times 2016 Notable Book

An immediate national best seller and instant classic from the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Empire Falls. Richard Russo returns to North Bath—“a town where dishonesty abounds, everyone misapprehends everyone else and half the citizens are half-crazy” (The New York Times)—and the characters who made Nobody’s Fool a beloved choice of book clubs everywhere. Everybody’s Fool is classic Russo, filled with humor, heart, hard times, and people you can’t help but love, possibly because their various faults make them so human.
 
Everybody’s Fool picks up roughly a decade since we were last with Miss Beryl and Sully on New Year's Eve 1984. The irresistible Sully, who in the intervening years has come by some unexpected good fortune, is staring down a VA cardiologist’s estimate that he has only a year or two left, and it’s hard work trying to keep this news from the most important people in his life: Ruth, the married woman he carried on with for years . . . the ultra-hapless Rub Squeers, who worries that he and Sully aren’t still best friends . . . Sully’s son and grandson, for whom he was mostly an absentee figure (and now a regretful one). We also enjoy the company of Doug Raymer, the chief of police who’s obsessing primarily over the identity of the man his wife might’ve been about to run off with, before dying in a freak accident . . . Bath’s mayor, the former academic Gus Moynihan, whose wife problems are, if anything, even more pressing . . . and then there’s Carl Roebuck, whose lifelong run of failing upward might now come to ruin. And finally, there’s Charice Bond—a light at the end of the tunnel that is Chief Raymer’s office—as well as her brother, Jerome, who might well be the train barreling into the station.

A crowning achievement—“like hopping on the last empty barstool surrounded by old friends” (Entertainment Weekly)—from one of the greatest storytellers of our time.
A provocative, unprecedented anthology featuring original short stories on what it means to be an American from thirty bestselling and award-winning authors with an introduction by Pulitzer Prize–winning author Viet Thanh Nguyen: “This chorus of brilliant voices articulating the shape and texture of contemporary America makes for necessary reading” (Lauren Groff, author of Fates and Furies).

When Donald Trump claimed victory in the November 2016 election, the US literary and art world erupted in indignation. Many of America’s preeminent writers and artists are stridently opposed to the administration’s agenda and executive orders—and they’re not about to go gentle into that good night. In this “masterful literary achievement” (Kurt Eichenwald, author of Conspiracy of Fools), more than thirty of the most acclaimed writers at work today consider the fundamental ideals of a free, just, and compassionate democracy through fiction in an anthology that “promises to be both a powerful tool in the fight to uphold our values and a tribute to the remarkable voices behind it” (Anthony D. Romero, executive director of the ACLU).

With an introduction by Pulitzer Prize-winning author, Viet Thanh Nguyen, and edited by bestselling author Jonathan Santlofer, this powerful anthology includes original, striking art from fourteen of the country’s most celebrated artists, cartoonists, and graphic novelists, including Art Spiegelman, Roz Chast, Marilyn Minter, and Eric Fischl.

Transcendent, urgent, and ultimately hopeful, It Occurs to Me That I Am America takes back the narrative of what it means to be an American in the 21st century.
Una historia conmovedora y sorprendente destinada a convertirse en un nuevo clásico de la literatura estadounidense, por el ganador del Premio Pulitzer.

Un mundo en otra parte, un lugar que mereciera la pena, era el sueño que su madre le inculcó, y que con esfuerzos logró para sí misma. Richard Russo echa la vista atrás y recuerda su infancia en la década de los cincuenta, cuando desapareció la prosperidad.

En su recuento de tribulaciones y aventuras, Russo, hijo único de una mujer tan frágil como rotunda, demuestra que la sombra de una madre se proyecta sobre toda nuestra vida.

La crítica ha dicho:
«Sobre mi madre engloba a cuatro generaciones de la familia de Richard Russo, con su firma de sensibilidad humorística, y sus reflexiones, a turnos tiernas y duras, acerca de la fragilidad humana, la paciencia, la fortaleza y el fervor.»
The Boston Globe

«Richard Russo siempre consigue que leyéndolo nos quitemos complejos. Es realmente terapéutico, como lo es el buen humor.»
Javier Aparicio Maydeu, El País

«Uno de los mejores novelistas de estos tiempos.»
The New York Times

«Lo que hace de Richard Russo un novelista tan admirable es que su gracia natural como narrador va de la mano con la compasión que siente por sus personajes.»
John Irving

«Hay un enorme e irónico corazón latiendo en el centro de su ficción.»
The New Yorker

«Un hábil constructor de historias, un muy buen recreador de ambientes y un escritor con excelente ojo para dibujar personajes que parecen tomados de la vida misma.»
José María Guelbenzu, El País

«Richard Russo es un escultor de personajes y un artífice del relato... una especie de Dickens milenarista y americano, un trabajador de esos lugares comunes que nada tienen que ver con los sitios vulgares.»
Rodrigo Fresán, El País

«Russo es un estupendo narrador de pequeñas historias de personajes grandes... Lo describe todo muy bien, lo explica con la solvencia con que suele hacerlo todo buen narrador cuando, revestido de alquimista, mezcla lo de fuera con lo de dentro. Pero lo conmovedor llega al final... Es entonces cuando la narración alcanza el cenit de su sentido.»
Roberts Saladdrigas, La Vanguardia

«Russo es el Stendhal de la clase obrera americana.»
Esquire

«Cuando se trata de evocar las esperanzas y los sueños más anhelados de la gente corriente, Russo no tiene igual.»
Publishers Weekly

«Russo escribe con una humanidad vibrante, cálida... Una conmovedora mezcla de melancolía, drama y comedia.»
The Washington Post

«Uno de los maestros de la literatura norteamericana contemporánea.»
The Book Studio

«Una obra de ensayo y memorias cargada de virtuosismo.»
Miami Herald

Empire Falls, eine Kleinstadt in Maine: Seit über zwanzig Jahren arbeitet Miles Roby im örtlichen Diner. Hier versammelt sich die ganze Stadt, vom Fitnessstudiobesitzer bis zum Schuldirektor. Miles selbst hat das College abgebrochen, ist geschieden und lebt in einer winzigen Wohnung über dem Restaurant. Und während er sein Bestes gibt, seiner Tochter dabei zu helfen, die Highschool zu überstehen, seinen trinkfreudigen Vater zu bändigen und dem Job im Diner gerecht zu werden, bleibt nicht viel Raum für das, was er sich vom Leben erhofft hat. Seine Verpflichtungen fesseln ihn an die Stadt, und erst als die äußeren Umstände ihn dazu zwingen, gelingt es ihm, Empire Falls zu verlassen. Er flieht mit seiner Tochter an den gemeinsamen Sehnsuchtsort Martha’s Vineyard. Seit Jahren spielt er mit dem Gedanken, sich hier niederzulassen. In ›Diese gottverdammten Träume‹ erzählt Richard Russo mit viel Wärme und Humor die Geschichte eines Mannes, der nicht der geworden ist, der er sein wollte, und zeigt das Leben in der Kleinstadt mit all seinen Absonderlichkeiten: ein Roman mit viel Gefühl für die Tragik, die im Alltäglichen liegt. »Nicht ein falscher Ton ... Russo besitzt eine unglaubliche Fähigkeit, das Besondere an einer Figur und einer Szene herauszuarbeiten.« NEWSDAY »Russo ist einer unserer besten Romanciers. « THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW »Russo ist ein meisterhafter Autor. Seine tiefe Weisheit zeigt sich in der Fehlbarkeit, dem Anstand, dem Humor und der Anmut seiner Figuren, die in ihrer Authentizität unwiderstehlich sind.« THE BOSTON GLOBE
Richard Russo—from his first novel, Mohawk, to his most recent, Straight Man—has demonstrated a peerless affinity for the human tragicomedy, and with this stunning new novel he extends even further his claims on the small-town, blue-collar heart of the country.

Dexter County, Maine, and specifically the town of Empire Falls, has seen better days, and for decades, in fact, only a succession from bad to worse. One by one, its logging and textile enterprises have gone belly-up, and the once vast holdings of the Whiting clan (presided over by the last scion’s widow) now mostly amount to decrepit real estate. The working classes, meanwhile, continue to eke out whatever meager promise isn’t already boarded up.

Miles Roby gazes over this ruined kingdom from the Empire Grill, an opportunity of his youth that has become the albatross of his daily and future life. Called back from college and set to work by family obligations—his mother ailing, his father a loose cannon—Miles never left home again. Even so, his own obligations are manifold: a pending divorce; a troubled younger brother; and, not least, a peculiar partnership in the failing grill with none other than Mrs. Whiting. All of these, though, are offset by his daughter, Tick, whom he guides gently and proudly through the tribulations of adolescence.

A decent man encircled by history and dreams, by echoing churches and abandoned mills, by the comforts and feuds provided by lifelong friends and neighbors, Miles is also a patient, knowing guide to the rich, hardscrabble nature of Empire Falls: fathers and sons and daughters, living and dead, rich and poor alike. Shot through with the mysteries of generations and the shattering visitations of the nation at large, it is a social novel of panoramic ambition, yet at the same time achingly personal. In the end, Empire Falls reveals our worst and best instincts, both our most appalling nightmares and our simplest hopes, with all the vision, grace and humanity of truly epic storytelling.
A New York Times 2016 Notable Book

An immediate national best seller and instant classic from the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Empire Falls. Richard Russo returns to North Bath—“a town where dishonesty abounds, everyone misapprehends everyone else and half the citizens are half-crazy” (The New York Times)—and the characters who made Nobody’s Fool a beloved choice of book clubs everywhere. Everybody’s Fool is classic Russo, filled with humor, heart, hard times, and people you can’t help but love, possibly because their various faults make them so human.
 
Everybody’s Fool picks up roughly a decade since we were last with Miss Beryl and Sully on New Year's Eve 1984. The irresistible Sully, who in the intervening years has come by some unexpected good fortune, is staring down a VA cardiologist’s estimate that he has only a year or two left, and it’s hard work trying to keep this news from the most important people in his life: Ruth, the married woman he carried on with for years . . . the ultra-hapless Rub Squeers, who worries that he and Sully aren’t still best friends . . . Sully’s son and grandson, for whom he was mostly an absentee figure (and now a regretful one). We also enjoy the company of Doug Raymer, the chief of police who’s obsessing primarily over the identity of the man his wife might’ve been about to run off with, before dying in a freak accident . . . Bath’s mayor, the former academic Gus Moynihan, whose wife problems are, if anything, even more pressing . . . and then there’s Carl Roebuck, whose lifelong run of failing upward might now come to ruin. And finally, there’s Charice Bond—a light at the end of the tunnel that is Chief Raymer’s office—as well as her brother, Jerome, who might well be the train barreling into the station.

A crowning achievement—“like hopping on the last empty barstool surrounded by old friends” (Entertainment Weekly)—from one of the greatest storytellers of our time.
Following Bridge of Sighs—a national best seller hailed by The Boston Globe as “an astounding achievement” and “a masterpiece”—Richard Russo gives us the story of a marriage, and of all the other ties that bind, from parents and in-laws to children and the promises of youth.

Griffin has been tooling around for nearly a year with his father’s ashes in the trunk, but his mother is very much alive and not shy about calling on his cell phone. She does so as he drives down to Cape Cod, where he and his wife, Joy, will celebrate the marriage of their daughter Laura’s best friend. For Griffin this is akin to driving into the past, since he took his childhood summer vacations here, his parents’ respite from the hated Midwest. And the Cape is where he and Joy honeymooned, in the course of which they drafted the Great Truro Accord, a plan for their lives together that’s now thirty years old and has largely come true. He’d left screenwriting and Los Angeles behind for the sort of New England college his snobby academic parents had always aspired to in vain; they’d moved into an old house full of character; and they’d started a family. Check, check and check.

But be careful what you pray for, especially if you manage to achieve it. By the end of this perfectly lovely weekend, the past has so thoroughly swamped the present that the future suddenly hangs in the balance. And when, a year later, a far more important wedding takes place, their beloved Laura’s, on the coast of Maine, Griffin’s chauffeuring two urns of ashes as he contends once more with Joy and her large, unruly family, and both he and she have brought dates along. How in the world could this have happened?

That Old Cape Magic is a novel of deep introspection and every family feeling imaginable, with a middle-aged man confronting his parents and their failed marriage, his own troubled one, his daughter’s new life and, finally, what it was he thought he wanted and what in fact he has. The storytelling is flawless throughout, moments of great comedy and even hilarity alternating with others of rueful understanding and heart-stopping sadness, and its ending is at once surprising, uplifting and unlike anything this Pulitzer Prize winner has ever written.
A provocative, unprecedented anthology featuring original short stories on what it means to be an American from thirty bestselling and award-winning authors with an introduction by Pulitzer Prize–winning author Viet Thanh Nguyen: “This chorus of brilliant voices articulating the shape and texture of contemporary America makes for necessary reading” (Lauren Groff, author of Fates and Furies).

When Donald Trump claimed victory in the November 2016 election, the US literary and art world erupted in indignation. Many of America’s preeminent writers and artists are stridently opposed to the administration’s agenda and executive orders—and they’re not about to go gentle into that good night. In this “masterful literary achievement” (Kurt Eichenwald, author of Conspiracy of Fools), more than thirty of the most acclaimed writers at work today consider the fundamental ideals of a free, just, and compassionate democracy through fiction in an anthology that “promises to be both a powerful tool in the fight to uphold our values and a tribute to the remarkable voices behind it” (Anthony D. Romero, executive director of the ACLU).

With an introduction by Pulitzer Prize-winning author, Viet Thanh Nguyen, and edited by bestselling author Jonathan Santlofer, this powerful anthology includes original, striking art from fourteen of the country’s most celebrated artists, cartoonists, and graphic novelists, including Art Spiegelman, Roz Chast, Marilyn Minter, and Eric Fischl.

Transcendent, urgent, and ultimately hopeful, It Occurs to Me That I Am America takes back the narrative of what it means to be an American in the 21st century.
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