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This collection is the first extended interrogation in any language of Jacques Lacan's Seminar XVII. Originally delivered just after the Paris uprisings of May 1968, Seminar XVII marked a turning point in Lacan’s thought; it was both a step forward in the psychoanalytic debates and an important contribution to social and political issues. Collecting important analyses by many of the major Lacanian theorists and practitioners, this anthology is at once an introduction, critique, and extension of Lacan’s influential ideas.

The contributors examine Lacan’s theory of the four discourses, his critique of the Oedipus complex and the superego, the role of primal affects in political life, and his prophetic grasp of twenty-first-century developments. They take up these issues in detail, illuminating the Lacanian concepts with in-depth discussions of shame and guilt, literature and intimacy, femininity, perversion, authority and revolt, and the discourse of marketing and political rhetoric. Topics of more specific psychoanalytic interest include the role of objet a, philosophy and psychoanalysis, the status of knowledge, and the relation between psychoanalytic practices and the modern university.

Contributors. Geoff Boucher, Marie-Hélène Brousse, Justin Clemens, Mladen Dolar, Oliver Feltham, Russell Grigg, Pierre-Gilles Guéguen, Dominique Hecq, Dominiek Hoens, Éric Laurent, Juliet Flower MacCannell, Jacques-Alain Miller, Ellie Ragland, Matthew Sharpe, Paul Verhaeghe, Slavoj Žižek, Alenka Zupancic

As primary subjects are increasingly being taught on an interdisciplinary level, Russell Grigg and Sioned Hughes have created an innovative new text, Teaching Primary Humanities. This new text explores current debate, encourages reflection and provides clear guidance on planning, teaching and assessing the humanities from the Early Years to Key Stage 2.

Through a blend of theory and real-life examples, Grigg and Hughes demonstrate the contribution that history, geography and religious education can make to enhancing children’s thinking, literacy, numeracy and ICT skills.

Whether you are a trainee or a practitioner, this book will develop your knowledge of how young children’s understanding of place, time and community can be fostered through a play-based curriculum. It will also benefit teachers of older children looking to encourage more independent learning in their schools.

About the authors:

Dr Russell Grigg is Head of the South West Wales Centre of Teacher Education. He is a trained primary inspector for England and Wales. He has written widely in the field of history and primary education including Wales in the Victorian Age and Becoming an Outstanding Primary Teacher.

Dr Sioned Hughes is Senior Lecturer in Initial Teacher Training at the South West Wales Centre of Teacher Education. She has published many educational materials, especially in primary geography. Her work on Patagonia was recognised by the Welsh Books Council as the ‘Bestselling Children’s Book’ in 2011.

In Teaching on a Shoestring: An A–Z of everyday objects to enthuse and engage children and extend learning in the early years, Russell Grigg and Helen Lewis explore the educational value of familiar objects and suggest practical activities to help develop young learners’ cross-curricular skills. We take many everyday objects for granted. But in a time of ever-tightening school budgets these objects can be invaluable in affording low-cost, high-impact opportunities for learning. With these value-for-money principles in mind, Russell and Helen have packed this practical A–Z handbook to the brim with fun facts, inspiring ideas and exciting activities to help teachers make the best use of familiar objects as launch pads for effective learning. Underpinned by solid theory, Teaching on a Shoestring investigates the learning potential of twenty-six inexpensive, readily available resources – from apples to ice cubes to zebra-patterned fabric – and shows how they can be exploited to develop in young learners the four skills widely regarded as essential in the twenty-first century: communication, collaboration, critical thinking and creativity. The book is organised into two parts: covering theory, then practice. In Part 1 the authors examine the nature of an object-rich learning environment and discuss the benefits of enquiry-based learning, in which the emphasis is upon promoting collaboration, dialogue and higher-order thinking in real-world contexts. In Part 2 the learning opportunities around the twenty-six objects are laid out in detail to illustrate how they can be put into practice. While the book focuses on object-based pedagogy employed with the under-sevens age category, many of the principles can also be applied with older children. There is a common format for the enquiry into each object, arranged into the following sections: In a nutshell – key background information about the object in its broader context; Did you know? – interesting facts about the object; Ready – key vocabulary, resources and health and safety factors to consider; Steady – learning goals and intentions; Go – activities which show how teachers can develop the four skills of communication, collaboration, critical thinking and creativity around the object; Other ideas – follow-up cross-curricular ideas; and Find out more – websites and other references for further information. Suitable for early years educators and anyone who works with young children.
"Undoubtedly, ‘Contributions to the Masculinity Complex in Women,’ is an underrated paper. This may be due to its not being published in English until 1924, well after Freud introduced the term ‘masculinity complex’ into his own writings. However, Van Ophuijsen’s paper was originally presented to the Dutch Psycho-Analytical Society much earlier, on 23rd June 1917. It was published in German the same year and in Dutch the following year. The term ‘masculinity complex’ is in fact van Ophugsen’s invention and Freud acknowledges his debt in his 1919 paper, ‘A Child is Being Beaten’. It is also in the present paper that various manifestations and possible consequences of penis envy are first clearly expressed, just as the libidinal investment in the ‘virile’ erogenous zone is linked to the attachment to the mother. This last point is particularly important, and Freud will later appeal to it in explaining the phallicism of the little girl. The material van Ophuijsen draws on derives from five case studies of obsessional women. One of the cases, who is here simply referred to as H., is subsequently discussed by Jeanne Lampl de Groot in her 1928 paper, ‘Evolution of the Oedipus Complex in Women’, a discussion Freud alludes to in his ‘Female Sexuality’ of 1931. The analysand was referred to Lampl de Groot because of difficulties encountered in the transference to a male analyst. It is also worth noting that van Ophuijsen takes her to be an obsessional, while Lampl de Groot diagnoses hysteria. Van Ophuijsen’s starting point concerns one aspect of the theory of penis envy; namely, that it derives from the sense a woman has of having been injured in infancy through no fault of her own and hence she will blame her mother for having brought her into this world as a woman instead of a man. This matches some character types encountered in analysis, van Ophuijsen conjectures. He also points out that this turning against the mother is, as with the castration complex, founded on a belief in the possibility of possessing the penis. The difference between the castration and masculinity complexes is that the sense of guilt attached to the former is absent from the masculinity complex, in which, on the other hand, what predominate are the sense of having been wronged and accompanying bitterness and reproaches. Moreover, the term is intended to connote the presence of a form of rivalry with men rather than the presence of any overt masculine characteristics. Finally, one should note the connection between the masculinity complex and the urethral erotism which van Ophuijsen explains in terms of a regression to the auto-erotic stage later tackled by other analysts such as Karen Homey."
Big Ideas in Education: What Every Teacher Should Know by Dr Russell Grigg provides an accessible and easily understood introductory guide to the big ideas that really matter in education. The teaching profession is saturated with ideas. Unfortunately, some of these are half-baked or fundamentally flawed. Dr Russell Grigg moves beyond the unhelpful supposed dichotomies that pervade current educational thinking – child-centred versus teacher-centred, traditional versus progressive. Throughout the book, readers are invited to question assumptions and popular rhetoric and reflect on their own experiences. Big Ideas in Education aims to equip teachers with a good understanding of current thinking in a diverse, fluid and dynamic field. Each of the big ideas is discussed within the framework of four questions: what is the big idea, who is behind it, why is it important and what can you do? Big ideas are important, distinctive, empowering, adaptable and simple to understand. Dr Russell Grigg provides readers with a concise and reliable introduction to twelve such ideas, which are at the core of educational practice. The ideas chosen are general rather than subject-specific in nature. In turn, they invite the reader to look at teaching in wider society, address elements of learning which teachers actively promote, raise questions about why, how and what to teach and, finally, look at ways of improving the quality of education. The twelve big ideas under discussion are: (1.) Education – education goes beyond the school gates and is a lifelong experience. (2.) Childhood – children need time and space to explore, enjoy learning and develop as children rather than miniature adults. (3.) Knowledge – knowledge is the foundation for learning. (4.) Skills – learners need to develop a broad range of skills in real-life, relevant contexts. (5.) Dispositions – effective learning depends upon cultivating positive dispositions. (6.) Ethics – teachers’ conduct should be guided by a moral purpose. (7.) Instruction – direct instruction is a tried-and-tested means of effective teaching. (8.) Curriculum – the curriculum is all the learning and assessment activities in school, both planned and unintentional, that contribute to agreed educational goals. (9.) Feedback – providing personalised, accurate, specific and timely feedback is one of the keys to improving learning. (10.) Reflective practice – good teachers critically analyse their practice with a view to improving what they do. (11.) Research – research has a central role to play in the professional development of teachers. (12.) Professional leadership – effective school leadership operates at all levels and is about shared vision, support and securing improvement. An ideal book for busy teachers who need to be kept up to speed with the latest thinking in education, this comprehensive guide provides the essential knowledge to keep you fully informed, whether leading staff discussions, submitting assignments or preparing for interviews. Suitable for teachers in any setting, from trainees and NQTs to more experienced practitioners looking to reflect on their practice, the book will also appeal to school leaders and teacher training providers.
As primary subjects are increasingly being taught on an interdisciplinary level, Russell Grigg and Sioned Hughes have created an innovative new text, Teaching Primary Humanities. This new text explores current debate, encourages reflection and provides clear guidance on planning, teaching and assessing the humanities from the Early Years to Key Stage 2.

Through a blend of theory and real-life examples, Grigg and Hughes demonstrate the contribution that history, geography and religious education can make to enhancing children’s thinking, literacy, numeracy and ICT skills.

Whether you are a trainee or a practitioner, this book will develop your knowledge of how young children’s understanding of place, time and community can be fostered through a play-based curriculum. It will also benefit teachers of older children looking to encourage more independent learning in their schools.

About the authors:

Dr Russell Grigg is Head of the South West Wales Centre of Teacher Education. He is a trained primary inspector for England and Wales. He has written widely in the field of history and primary education including Wales in the Victorian Age and Becoming an Outstanding Primary Teacher.

Dr Sioned Hughes is Senior Lecturer in Initial Teacher Training at the South West Wales Centre of Teacher Education. She has published many educational materials, especially in primary geography. Her work on Patagonia was recognised by the Welsh Books Council as the ‘Bestselling Children’s Book’ in 2011.

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