#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • The world-famous cosmologist and author of A Brief History of Time leaves us with his final thoughts on the biggest questions facing humankind.

“Hawking’s parting gift to humanity . . . a book every thinking person worried about humanity’s future should read.”—NPR

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY Forbes • The Guardian • Wired

Stephen Hawking was the most renowned scientist since Einstein, known both for his groundbreaking work in physics and cosmology and for his mischievous sense of humor. He educated millions of readers about the origins of the universe and the nature of black holes, and inspired millions more by defying a terrifying early prognosis of ALS, which originally gave him only two years to live. In later life he could communicate only by using a few facial muscles, but he continued to advance his field and serve as a revered voice on social and humanitarian issues.

Hawking not only unraveled some of the universe’s greatest mysteries but also believed science plays a critical role in fixing problems here on Earth. Now, as we face immense challenges on our planet—including climate change, the threat of nuclear war, and the development of artificial intelligence—he turns his attention to the most urgent issues facing us.

Will humanity survive? Should we colonize space? Does God exist? ​​These are just a few of the questions Hawking addresses in this wide-ranging, passionately argued final book from one of the greatest minds in history.

Featuring a foreword by Eddie Redmayne, who won an Oscar playing Stephen Hawking, an introduction by Nobel Laureate Kip Thorne, and an afterword from Hawking’s daughter, Lucy, Brief Answers to the Big Questions is a brilliant last message to the world.

Praise for Brief Answers to the Big Questions

“[Hawking is] a symbol of the soaring power of the human mind.”—The Washington Post

“Hawking’s final message to readers . . . is a hopeful one.”—CNN

“Brisk, lucid peeks into the future of science and of humanity.”—The Wall Street Journal

“Hawking pulls no punches on subjects like machines taking over, the biggest threat to Earth, and the possibilities of intelligent life in space.”—Quartz

“Effortlessly instructive, absorbing, up to the minute and—where it matters—witty.”—The Guardian

“This beautiful little book is a fitting last twinkle from a new star in the firmament above.”—The Telegraph
The legendary physicist explores his favorite subject in a pair of enlightening, accessible, and cleverly illustrated essays for curious readers, originally delivered as BBC lectures.
 
“It is said that fact is sometimes stranger than fiction, and nowhere is that more true than in the case of black holes. Black holes are stranger than anything dreamed up by science-fiction writers, but they are firmly matters of science fact.”
 
For decades, Stephen Hawking has been fascinated by black holes. He believes that if we understood the challenges they pose to the very nature of space and time, we could unlock the secrets of the universe. In these conversational pieces, Hawking’s sense of wonder is infectious as he holds forth on what we know about black holes, what we still don’t know, and theoretical answers to more specific questions, such as: What would happen if you ever got sucked into one? Annotated and with an introduction by BBC News science editor David Shukman, featuring whimsical and illuminating illustrations, Black Holes offers a candid peek into one of the great scientific mysteries of all time.
 
Praise for Stephen Hawking
 
“[Hawking] can explain the complexities of cosmological physics with an engaging combination of clarity and wit. . . . His is a brain of extraordinary power.”—The New York Review of Books
 
“Hawking clearly possesses a natural teacher’s gifts—easy, good-natured humor and an ability to illustrate highly complex propositions with analogies plucked from daily life.”—The New York Times
 
“A high priest of physics, one of a handful of theorists who may be on the verge of reading God’s mind.”—Los Angeles Times
Aun antes de aparecer, este libro ha venido precedido, en todos los medios de comunicación, de una extraordinaria polémica sobre sus conclusiones: que tanto nuestro universo como los otros muchos universos posibles surgieron de la nada, porque su creación no requiere de la intervención de ningún Dios o ser sobrenatural, sino que todos los universos proceden naturalmente de las leyes físicas.

En efecto, este libro de Stephen Hawking y Leonard Mlodinow sobre los descubrimientos y los progresos técnicos más recientes nos presenta una nueva imagen del universo, y de nuestro lugar en él, muy distinta de la tradicional e, incluso, de la imagen que el propio Hawking nos había proporcionado, hace ya más de veinte años, en su gran libro Historia del tiempo. En él el gran físico nos explicaba de dónde procedía el universo y hacia dónde se encaminaba, pero aún no podía dar respuesta a importantes preguntas: ¿por qué existe el universo?, ¿por qué hay algo en lugar de nada?, ¿por qué existimos nosotros?, ¿necesita el universo un creador? En los últimos años, el desarrollo de la teoría “M” (en realidad toda una familia de teorías enlazadas sobre física cuántica) y las recientes observaciones realizadas por los satélites de la NASA, nos permiten ya enfrentarnos a la pregunta fundamental: la Cuestión Última de la Vida, el Universo y el Todo. Si esta teoría última es verificada por la observación científica, habremos culminado una búsqueda que se remonta a hace más de tres mil años: habremos hallado el Gran Diseño.
Un interesante y fascinante debate entre dos gigantes de la ciencia, Stephen Hawking y Roger Penrose, sobre el origen y el futuro del universo.

Einstein afirmaba que lo más incomprensible acerca del universo es que es comprensible. ¿Estaba en lo cierto? ¿Pueden la teoría cuántica de campos y la teoría de la relatividad general de Einstein, las dos teorías, más precisas y exitosas de toda la física, unirse en una única teoría cuántica de la gravedad? Aunque se ha avanzado mucho en esta búsqueda, Hawking y Penrose insisten en que es necesario llegar mucho más lejos.

En La naturaleza del espacio y el tiempo, estos dos gigantes de la física entablan un debate fundamental sobre el origen del universo. Un libro escrito a cuatro manos, con un epílogo actualizado, en el que los autores resumen cómo los recientes acontecimientos han provocado que sus posturas difieran en cuestiones tan importantes como la geometría espacial del universo o la paradoja de la desaparición de información en los agujeros negros.

La prensa especializada opina...
«Una obra reveladora sobre dos aproximaciones distintas a algunos de los mayores problemas sin resolver de la gravitación y la cosmología.»
New Scientist

«Un debate entre Hawking y Penrose alimenta las expectativas del lector por asistir a un intercambio extraordinario de ideas. En este texto, animado con el sentido del humor de Hawking, las expectativas se cumplen con creces.»
The Higher Education

«Un magnífico y estimulante intercambio intelectual entre dos mentes de primera categoría.»
Library Journal

«Una lectura interesantísima para el presente que promete ser aún más interesante para las futuras generaciones de físicos.»
Science

«Un documento de gran rigor científico.»
Physics World

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • The world-famous cosmologist and author of A Brief History of Time leaves us with his final thoughts on the biggest questions facing humankind.

“Hawking’s parting gift to humanity . . . a book every thinking person worried about humanity’s future should read.”—NPR

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY Forbes • The Guardian • Wired

Stephen Hawking was the most renowned scientist since Einstein, known both for his groundbreaking work in physics and cosmology and for his mischievous sense of humor. He educated millions of readers about the origins of the universe and the nature of black holes, and inspired millions more by defying a terrifying early prognosis of ALS, which originally gave him only two years to live. In later life he could communicate only by using a few facial muscles, but he continued to advance his field and serve as a revered voice on social and humanitarian issues.

Hawking not only unraveled some of the universe’s greatest mysteries but also believed science plays a critical role in fixing problems here on Earth. Now, as we face immense challenges on our planet—including climate change, the threat of nuclear war, and the development of artificial intelligence—he turns his attention to the most urgent issues facing us.

Will humanity survive? Should we colonize space? Does God exist? ​​These are just a few of the questions Hawking addresses in this wide-ranging, passionately argued final book from one of the greatest minds in history.

Featuring a foreword by Eddie Redmayne, who won an Oscar playing Stephen Hawking, an introduction by Nobel Laureate Kip Thorne, and an afterword from Hawking’s daughter, Lucy, Brief Answers to the Big Questions is a brilliant last message to the world.

Praise for Brief Answers to the Big Questions

“[Hawking is] a symbol of the soaring power of the human mind.”—The Washington Post

“Hawking’s final message to readers . . . is a hopeful one.”—CNN

“Brisk, lucid peeks into the future of science and of humanity.”—The Wall Street Journal

“Hawking pulls no punches on subjects like machines taking over, the biggest threat to Earth, and the possibilities of intelligent life in space.”—Quartz

“Effortlessly instructive, absorbing, up to the minute and—where it matters—witty.”—The Guardian

“This beautiful little book is a fitting last twinkle from a new star in the firmament above.”—The Telegraph
THE FIRST MAJOR WORK IN NEARLY A DECADE BY ONE OF THE WORLD’S GREAT THINKERS—A MARVELOUSLY CONCISE BOOK WITH NEW ANSWERS TO THE ULTIMATE QUESTIONS OF LIFE
 
When and how did the universe begin? Why are we here? Why is there something rather than nothing? What is the nature of reality? Why are the laws of nature so finely tuned as to allow for the existence of beings like ourselves? And, finally, is the apparent “grand design” of our universe evidence of a benevolent creator who set things in motion—or does science offer another explanation?

The most fundamental questions about the origins of the universe and of life itself, once the province of philosophy, now occupy the territory where scientists, philosophers, and theologians meet—if only to disagree. In their new book, Stephen Hawking and Leonard Mlodinow present the most recent scientific thinking about the mysteries of the universe, in nontechnical language marked by both brilliance and simplicity.

In The Grand Design they explain that according to quantum theory, the cosmos does not have just a single existence or history, but rather that every possible history of the universe exists simultaneously. When applied to the universe as a whole, this idea calls into question the very notion of cause and effect. But the “top-down” approach to cosmology that Hawking and

Mlodinow describe would say that the fact that the past takes no definite form means that we create history by observing it, rather than that history creates us. The authors further explain that we ourselves are the product of quantum fluctuations in the very early universe, and show how quantum theory predicts the “multiverse”—the idea that ours is just one of many universes that appeared spontaneously out of nothing, each with different laws of nature.

Along the way Hawking and Mlodinow question the conventional concept of reality, posing a “model-dependent” theory of reality as the best we can hope to find. And they conclude with a riveting assessment of M-theory, an explanation of the laws governing us and our universe that is currently the only viable candidate for a complete “theory of everything.” If confirmed, they write, it will be the unified theory that Einstein was looking for, and the ultimate triumph of human reason.

A succinct, startling, and lavishly illustrated guide to discoveries that are altering our understanding and threatening some of our most cherished belief systems, The Grand Design is a book that will inform—and provoke—like no other.
Stephen Hawking’s phenomenal, multimillion-copy bestseller, A Brief History of Time, introduced the ideas of this brilliant theoretical physicist to readers all over the world.

Now, in a major publishing event, Hawking returns with a lavishly illustrated sequel that unravels the mysteries of the major breakthroughs that have occurred in the years since the release of his acclaimed first book.

The Universe in a Nutshell

• Quantum mechanics
• M-theory
• General relativity
• 11-dimensional supergravity
• 10-dimensional membranes
• Superstrings
• P-branes
• Black holes

One of the most influential thinkers of our time, Stephen Hawking is an intellectual icon, known not only for the adventurousness of his ideas but for the clarity and wit with which he expresses them. In this new book Hawking takes us to the cutting edge of theoretical physics, where truth is often stranger than fiction, to explain in laymen’s terms the principles that control our universe.

Like many in the community of theoretical physicists, Professor Hawking is seeking to uncover the grail of science — the elusive Theory of Everything that lies at the heart of the cosmos. In his accessible and often playful style, he guides us on his search to uncover the secrets of the universe — from supergravity to supersymmetry, from quantum theory to M-theory, from holography to duality.

He takes us to the wild frontiers of science, where superstring theory and p-branes may hold the final clue to the puzzle. And he lets us behind the scenes of one of his most exciting intellectual adventures as he seeks “to combine Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity and Richard Feynman’s idea of multiple histories into one complete unified theory that will describe everything that happens in the universe.”

With characteristic exuberance, Professor Hawking invites us to be fellow travelers on this extraordinary voyage through space-time. Copious four-color illustrations help clarify this journey into a surreal wonderland where particles, sheets, and strings move in eleven dimensions; where black holes evaporate and disappear, taking their secret with them; and where the original cosmic seed from which our own universe sprang was a tiny nut.

The Universe in a Nutshell is essential reading for all of us who want to understand the universe in which we live. Like its companion volume, A Brief History of Time, it conveys the excitement felt within the scientific community as the secrets of the cosmos reveal themselves.

In this series of lectures Stephen W.Hawking tries to give an outline of what we think is the history of the universe from the big bang to black holes.The first lecture briefly reviews past ideas about universe and how we got to our present picture.One might call this the history of the universe. The second lecture describes how both Newton s and Einstein s theories of gravity led to the conclusion that the universe could not be static:it had to be either expanding or contracting.This,in turn,implied that there must have been a time between ten and twenty billion years ago when the density of the universe was infinite.This is called the big bang.It would have been the beginning of the universe. The third lecture talks about the black holes.these are formed when a massive star or an even larger body collapses in on itself under it s own gravitational pull.According to Einstein s general theory of relativity,any one foolish enough to fall into a black hole will be lost forever.they will not be able to come out of the black hole again.Instead,history,as far as they are concerned.will come to a sticky end at a singularity.However,general relativity is a classical theory that is,it does not take into account the uncertainity principle of quantum mechanics. The fourth lecture describes how quantum mechanics allows energy to leak out of black holes.Black holes are not as black as they are painted. The fifth lecture shall apply quantum mechanical ideas to the big bang and the origin of the universe.This leads to the idea that space-time may be finite in extent but without boundary or edge.It would be like the surface of the earth but with two more dimensions. The sixth lecture shows how this boundary proposal could explain why the past is so different from the future,even though the laws of physics are time symmetric. Finally,in the seventh lecture Stephen W.Hawking describes how we are trying to find a unified theory that will include quantum mechanics,gravity,and all oth ...Shrink

©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.