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This book lists approximately 9,000 core Japanese words that can be searched with English equivalents. It’s ideal for learners of Japanese as a second language who want to communicate more effectively and also for learners of English who know Japanese.

Japanese is written with three different scripts: Hiragana, Katakana, and Kanji.  Typical Japanese words are written with Hiragana and Kanji. Katakana is usually used to write foreign words other than Chinese.

English main entries are in alphabetical order and stressed syllables of them are inboldface type  for clear communication in English.

(The contrast between stressed and unstressed syllables is very important because it helps to create the rhythm of English.) 


Each main entry is followed by parts of speech label and the entry’s Japanese equivalents. All Japanese equivalent for main entries are written in both Rōmaji (Roman letters) and Japanese writing: Kana and Kanji (Chinese characters) if applicable.


[example]

abbreviate  [v.] shōryaku suru 省略する, tanshuku suru 短縮する

Learners can select to learn Chinese characters according to their needs and levels. For those who know Chinese characters, it might be easier to learn Japanese since almost 90% of the language derives from Chinese characters.

Since many Japanese prefer to use foreign words in daily conversation, Japanese pronunciation of foreign words are romanized in this book for better communication with Japanese.

[example]

advice  [n.] adobaisu アドバイス, chūkoku 忠告, jogen 助言


* Please refer to the website for more information. www.corevoca.com

A syllable is part of a word that contains one vowel sound. In every word of two or more syllables, one syllable is stressed. It’s called ‘stressed syllable’. The vowel sound in that syllable is louder, higher in pitch, and longer than the other vowel sounds in the same word.

In this book, stressed syllable is written in larger boldface. (Example: academy [əkædəmi]) Unstressed syllables are often pronounced with the schwa vowel sound (ə). All one syllable words have primary stress when spoken separately. (Examples: big, day)

The contrast between stressed and unstressed syllables is very important because it helps to create the rhythm of English. The native English speakers rely more on stressed syllable to understand what you say than on the individual sounds of the word.

This book lists 16,616 core English words that are divided into 25 vowel categories containing stressed syllables and listed alphabetically within each category. Also the words are divided into three different levels of ESL (English as a Second Language) so that learners can practice pronunciation according to their levels. Level 1 (for elementary & middle school) is written in red, level 2 (for high school) is written in blue, and level 3 (for university and above) is written in black.

Words with same spelling but different stressed syllables or words with same spelling but different pronunciation are differentiated using following parts of speech.

 

[n.] noun   [a.] adjective   [v.] verb

 

This book is ideal for learners of English as a second language who want to communicate more effectively and also for native English speakers who wish to change dialects.


* Please refer to the website for more information. www.corevoca.com

This book lists approximately 4,800 core Japanese words with standard Chinese (Mandarin) and English equivalents. Main entries are in Romanized Japanese with Chinese characters, if any. In the second  line, pasts of speech label ([n.] for nouns and [v.] for verbs) and the entry’s Chinese equivalents in Pinyin (Romanized standard Chinese pronunciation) followed by Chinese characters (both simplified and traditional if applicable). Then, in the third line, entry’s English equivalents with standard American pronunciation with focus on stressed syllable*in bold print..

A syllable is part of a word that contains one vowel sound. In every word of two or more syllables, one syllable is stressed. It’s called ‘stressed syllable’. The vowel sound in that syllable is louder, higher in pitch, and longer than the other vowel sounds in the same word.

The contrast between stressed and unstressed syllables is very important because it helps to create the rhythm of English. The native English speakers rely more on stressed syllable to understand what you say than on the individual sounds of the word.

This book is ideal for learners of Japanese, Chinese, and English as a second language who want to communicate more effectively.


[Sample]

ashita  明日

  [n.] míng rì  明日

  tomorrow  [təma:rou]

asobi  遊び

  [n.] yóu xì  游戏 (遊戲)

  play  [plei]

chikuseki  蓄積

  [n.] jī xù  积蓄 (積蓄)

  accumulation  [əkyu:məleiʃən]

* Please refer to the website for more information. www.corevoca.com

This book lists approximately 4,800 core Japanese words with standard Chinese (Mandarin) and Korean equivalents. Main entries are in Japanese with Chinese characters, if any, followed by parts of speech (n. for noun and v. for verb). In the second line, the entry’s Chinese equivalents in Pinyin (Romanized standard Chinese pronunciation) followed by Chinese characters (both simplified and traditional if applicable). Then, in the third line, entry’s Romanized Korean equivalents with Hangul (Korean character) and Chinese characters, if any.

This book is ideal for learners of Japanese, Chinese, and Korean as a second language who want to build up vocabulary most effectively using common Chinese characters.

各学校の授業や各種試験はもちろん、日常生活及びビジネスに必要な一般語彙などおよそ4,800個の中国語及び韓国語の語彙を収録した。 見出し語はかなの五十音順に表記し、語彙を楽に検索できるようにした。また、『見出し語』、『日本語』、『品詞』を一番目の行に、ピンイン(pinyin 併音: 公定のローマ字発音)で表記した対応する『中国語語彙の発音』と『中国語語彙の簡体字及び繁体字(該当する場合)を二番目の行に、 ローマ字で書かれた『韓国語の発音』と『ハングル及び漢字』を三番目の行にまとめた。


각급 학교의 수업, 각종 시험은 물론 일상생활 및 비즈니스에 필요한 일반어휘 등 4,800여개의 일본어 및 중국어 어휘를 수록하였으며, 표제어를 카나 50음순으로 표기하여 어휘를 쉽게 검색할 수 있도록 하였다.  또한 『표제어』, 『일본어』,『품사』를 첫번째 줄에, pinyin(병음; 공인된 로마자 발음)으로 표기한 『중국어 어휘의 발음』과 『중국어 어휘의 간체자 및 번체자(해당시)』를 두번째 줄에, 그리고 로마자로 표기된 『한국어 발음』과 『한글 및 한자』를 세번째 줄에 정리하였다.

[例]

あいじん  愛人  [n.] 

ài rén  爱人 (愛人)

ae in  애인(愛人)


あいする  愛する  [v.] 

ài  爱 (愛)

sa rang ha da  사랑하다


あいだ  間  [n.] 

jiān  间 (間)

sa i  사이

[Highlights]

Study Korean anytime and anywhere with smartphone, tablet, etc

Focused on the pronunciation of common Chinese characters, which comprise approximately 70% of Chinese characters in Korea and China

Main entries are in Hangul (Korean alphabet) alphabetically for easy vocabulary search with Romanized Korean pronunciation


[Who needs this book]

Students, businessmen, travelers who want to increase Korean vocabulary in short term

Mandarin speakers who want to increase Korean vocabulary themselves easily

Anyone who want to give this book as a gift to their children, grandchildren or others

This book lists approximately 4,800 core Korean vocabulary for school, examinations, business, and travel. Main entries are in Hangul (Korean alphabet) alphabetically with Chinese characters (traditional font).  Chinese characters (both simplified and traditional fonts if applicable) and Pinyin (Romanized standard Chinese pronunciation) follow in the same line.

Common Chinese character words are written in blue, while certain words with same meaning but with different syllable order are written in red.  Some syllables with partially different fonts are also written in red.

In case of part of speech, most of Korean verbs are in the form of ‘noun+‘하다(hada)’ with some exceptions.

[Sample]

사고(事故)  / 事故  shì gù

사고(思考)  / 思考  sī kăo

사고방식(思考方式)  / 思维方式 (思維方式)  sī wéi fāng shì

사과(謝過)  / 请罪 (請罪)  qǐng zuì

사과(謝過)하다  / 请罪 (請罪)  qǐng zuì

사기(詐欺)  / 欺诈 (欺詐)  qī zhà


* Please refer to the website for more information. www.corevoca.com

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