Revisit a world of conquest, exploration, and imperial adventure with this Modern Library eBook bundle that includes Edward Gibbon’s The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Francis Parkman’s Montcalm and Wolfe, William H. Prescott’s History of the Conquest of Mexico, and Theodore Roosevelt’s The Naval War of 1812.
 
THE DECLINE AND FALL OF THE ROMAN EMPIRE (ABRIDGED)
 
Edward Gibbon’s masterpiece, which narrates the history of the Roman Empire from the second to the fifteenth centuries, is widely considered the greatest work of history ever written. This abridgment retains the full scope of the original, while emphasizing elements ignored in all other abridgments—in particular the role of religion in the empire and the rise of Islam.
 
MONTCALM AND WOLFE
 
The result of more than forty years of passionate research, Montcalm and Wolfe is the epic story of Europe’s struggle for dominance of the New World. Thought by many to be Francis Parkman’s greatest work, it is a riveting read and an essential part of any military history collection.
 
HISTORY OF THE CONQUEST OF MEXICO
 
William H. Prescott’s sweeping account of Cortés’s subjugation of the Aztec people has endured as a landmark work of scholarship and dramatic storytelling. This pioneering study presents a compelling view of the clash of civilizations that reverberates in Latin America to this day.
 
THE NAVAL WAR OF 1812
 
Published when its author, Theodore Roosevelt, was only twenty-three years old, The Naval War of 1812 was immediately hailed as a literary and scholarly triumph, and it is still considered the definitive book on the subject. Roosevelt’s inimitable style and robust narrative make The Naval War of 1812 enthralling, illuminating, and utterly essential to every armchair historian.
This meticulously edited ebook edition represents the great literary legacy of the president Theodore Roosevelt. Besides historical books, biographies, nature and guide books, you will find in this collection – his memoirs, personal and presidential writings through which you will discover surprising adventurous life the former president, as well as details of his presidential actions and truth behind certain decisions. Contents: Autobiography The Naval War of 1812 Hero Tales from American History The Winning of the West Through the Brazilian Wilderness Letters to His Children The Rough Riders A Book-Lover's Holidays in the Open Hunting The Grisly And Other Sketches America and the World War Average Americans The Strenuous Life Expansion and Peace Fellow-Feeling as Political Factor Character & Success History as Literature Biological Analogies in History The World Movement The Thraldom of Names Productive Scholarship Dante and the Bowery The Foundations of the Nineteenth Century The Search for Truth in a Reverent Spirit The Ancient Irish Sagas An Art Exhibition The Duties of American Citizenship Professionalism in Sports Practical Work in Politics Resignation Letter Colonel Roosevelt's Reports Strength & Decency The Square Deal Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech The Man With the Muck Rake Sons of the Puritans Where We Can Work With Socialists Where We Cannot Work With Socialists Citizenship in a Republic (the Man in the Arena) International Peace The New Nationalism Duty & Self-control The Right of the People to Rule I Have Just Been Shot Address to the Boys Progressive League Address to the Knights of Columbus
Darling Ethel: Of course you remember the story of the little prairie girl. I always associate it with you. Well, again and again on this trip we would pass through prairie villages-bleak and lonely-with all the people in from miles about to see me. Among them were dozens of young girls, often pretty, and as far as I could see much more happy than the heroine of the story. One of them shook hands with me, and then, after much whispering, said: "We want to shake hands with the guard!" The "guard" proved to be Roly, who was very swell in his uniform, and whom they evidently thought much more attractive than the President...-from "Prairie Girls"Remembered today for his expansive personality and grand sense of adventure, Theodore Roosevelt-politician and soldier, naturalist and historian-was also a devoted, doting father and husband. This beautiful selection of the letters he wrote to his children over the courses of their lives, as well as a few written to other correspondents about the children, reveal a man deeply in love with his family and with the joys of fatherhood. The tales of Christmases at the White House and whistle-stop tours through the American countryside offer a cozy glimpse into one of the greatest American presidencies... and Roosevelt's tenderness with his sons and daughters-as he treats them as friends, confidantes, and equals-creates a warm and intimate portrait of one of the great American characters.Also available from Cosimo Classics: Roosevelt's A Book-Lover's Holidays in the Open, America and the World War, Through the Brazilian Wilderness and Papers on Natural History, Ranch Life and the Hunting Trail, The Strenuous Life: Essays and Addresses, and Historic Towns: New YorkOF INTEREST TO: Roosevelt fans, readers of autobiography, students of the American presidencyAmerican icon THEODORE ROOSEVELT (1858-1919) was 26th President of the United States, serving from 1901 to 1909, and the first American to win a Nobel Prize, in 1906, when he was awarded the Peace Prize for mediating the Russo-Japanese War. He is the author of 35 books.
The Greco-Roman world saw a civilization far more brilliant, far more varied and intense, than any that had gone before it, and one that affected a far larger share of the world's surface. For the first time there began to be something which at least foreshadowed a "world movement" in the sense that it affected a considerable portion of the world's surface and that it represented what was incomparably the most important of all that was happening in world history at the time.-from "The World Movement"A man of prodigious and wide-ranging interests, Theodore Roosevelt-politician and soldier, naturalist and historian-was the youngest president in American history, ascending to the office when he was only 42... and with much vigorous life in him and influence to exert after he left the Oval Office, as this 1914 volume ably demonstrates. In this collection of essays for various publications and addresses delivered before Oxford University, the University of Berlin, the Sorbonne, and the American Historical Association in the years after he left the White House, Roosevelt introduces us to his fascinating ideas on everything from world history and classic literature to the duties of citizens and the machinations of politics. This is a striking look inside the inquisitive mind and vivacious spirit of one of the great American personalities.Also available from Cosimo Classics: Roosevelt's America and the World War, Letters to His Children, A Book-Lover's Holidays in the Open, Through the Brazilian Wilderness and Papers on Natural History, Ranch Life and the Hunting Trail, The Strenuous Life: Essays and Addresses, and Historic Towns: New YorkOF INTEREST TO: Roosevelt fans, students of the American presidencyAUTHOR BIO: Politician and soldier, naturalist and historian, American icon THEODORE ROOSEVELT (1858-1919) was 26th President of the United States, serving from 1901 to 1909, and the first American to win a Nobel Prize, in 1906, when he was awarded the Peace Prize for mediating the Russo-Japanese War. He is the author of 35 books.
The one permanent move for obtaining peace, which has not yet been suggested, with any reasonable chance of attaining its object, is by an agreement among the great powers, in which each should pledge itself not only to abide by the decisions of a common tribunal but to back with force the decisions of that common tribunal. The great civilized nations of the world which do possess force, actual or immediately potential, should combine by solemn agreement in a great World League for the Peace of Righteousness. -from "World Peace"Theodore Roosevelt was still a young man when he left the Oval Office, and he remained a vigorous force on the American scene. The great influence he continued to hold over the public allowed him to contest the policies of President Woodrow Wilson, particularly Wilson's conduct in the leadup to America's belated entry into World War I. In this 1915 work, Roosevelt lays out the moral and political case for coming to the aid of the nation's European allies, from the ethics of self-defense to the practicalities of preparing for war.Roosevelt's arguments are compelling and humane, but agree with him or not, here is an essential part of the powerful basis for his place in American history as the architect of the American Century, as well as a revealing picture of the character of one of the great American personalities.Also available from Cosimo Classics: Roosevelt's Letters to His Children, A Book-Lover's Holidays in the Open, Through the Brazilian Wilderness and Papers on Natural History, Ranch Life and the Hunting Trail, The Strenuous Life: Essays and Addresses, and Historic Towns: New YorkOF INTEREST TO: Roosevelt fans, students of the American presidency, readers of World War IPolitician and soldier, naturalist and historian, American icon THEODORE ROOSEVELT (1858-1919) was 26th President of the United States, serving from 1901 to 1909, and the first American to win a Nobel Prize, in 1906, when he was awarded the Peace Prize for mediating the Russo-Japanese War. He is the author of 35 books.
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