A New York Times bestseller!

A New York Times Book Review Notable Book of 2017

A dual biography of Winston Churchill and George Orwell, who preserved democracy from the threats of authoritarianism, from the left and right alike.

Both George Orwell and Winston Churchill came close to death in the mid-1930's—Orwell shot in the neck in a trench line in the Spanish Civil War, and Churchill struck by a car in New York City. If they'd died then, history would scarcely remember them. At the time, Churchill was a politician on the outs, his loyalty to his class and party suspect. Orwell was a mildly successful novelist, to put it generously. No one would have predicted that by the end of the 20th century they would be considered two of the most important people in British history for having the vision and courage to campaign tirelessly, in words and in deeds, against the totalitarian threat from both the left and the right. In a crucial moment, they responded first by seeking the facts of the matter, seeing through the lies and obfuscations, and then they acted on their beliefs. Together, to an extent not sufficiently appreciated, they kept the West's compass set toward freedom as its due north.

It's not easy to recall now how lonely a position both men once occupied. By the late 1930's, democracy was discredited in many circles, and authoritarian rulers were everywhere in the ascent. There were some who decried the scourge of communism, but saw in Hitler and Mussolini "men we could do business with," if not in fact saviors. And there were others who saw the Nazi and fascist threat as malign, but tended to view communism as the path to salvation. Churchill and Orwell, on the other hand, had the foresight to see clearly that the issue was human freedom—that whatever its coloration, a government that denied its people basic freedoms was a totalitarian menace and had to be resisted.

In the end, Churchill and Orwell proved their age's necessary men. The glorious climax of Churchill and Orwell is the work they both did in the decade of the 1940's to triumph over freedom's enemies. And though Churchill played the larger role in the defeat of Hitler and the Axis, Orwell's reckoning with the menace of authoritarian rule in Animal Farm and 1984 would define the stakes of the Cold War for its 50-year course, and continues to give inspiration to fighters for freedom to this day. Taken together, in Thomas E. Ricks's masterful hands, their lives are a beautiful testament to the power of moral conviction, and to the courage it can take to stay true to it, through thick and thin.

Churchill and Orwell is a perfect gift for the holidays!
Fiasco, Thomas E. Ricks’s #1 New York Times bestseller, transformed the political dialogue on the war in Iraq—The Gamble is the next news breaking installment

Thomas E. Ricks uses hundreds of hours of exclusive interviews with top officers in Iraq and extraordinary on-the-ground reportage to document the inside story of the Iraq War since late 2005 as only he can, examining the events that took place as the military was forced to reckon with itself, the surge was launched, and a very different war began.

Since early 2007 a new military order has directed American strategy. Some top U.S. officials now in Iraq actually opposed the 2003 invasion, and almost all are severely critical of how the war was fought from then through 2006. At the core of the story is General David Petraeus, a military intellectual who has gathered around him an unprecedented number of officers with both combat experience and Ph.D.s. Underscoring his new and unorthodox approach, three of his key advisers are quirky foreigners—an Australian infantryman-turned- anthropologist, an antimilitary British woman who is an expert in the Middle East, and a Mennonite-educated Palestinian pacifist.

The Gamble offers news-breaking account, revealing behind-the-scenes disagreements between top commanders. We learn that almost every single officer in the chain of command fought the surge. Many of Petraeus’s closest advisers went to Iraq extremely pessimistic, doubting that the surge would have any effect, and his own boss was so skeptical that he dispatched an admiral to Baghdad in the summer of 2007 to come up with a strategy to replace Petraeus’s. That same boss later flew to Iraq to try to talk Petraeus out of his planned congressional testimony. The Gamble examines the congressional hearings through the eyes of Petraeus and Ambassador Ryan Crocker, and their views of the questions posed by the 2008 presidential candidates.

For Petraeus, prevailing in Iraq means extending the war. Thomas E. Ricks concludes that the war is likely to last another five to ten years—and that that outcome is a best case scenario. His stunning conclusion, stated in the last line of the book, is that “the events for which the Iraq war will be remembered by us and by the world have not yet happened.”
Tanto George Orwell como Winston Churchill vieron peligrar su vida a mediados de la década de 1930: Orwell por un disparo en el cuello en la guerra civil española y Churchill en un accidente de coche en Nueva York. De haber muerto entonces, la historia apenas les recordaría. Churchill era un político acabado, sospechoso para su clase y para su propio partido, y Orwell era un novelista del que como mucho se habría podido decir que tenía un éxito moderado.

Ambos mantenían una actitud antitotalitaria que no contaba con demasiados partidarios en aquella época. La democracia había quedado desacreditada en muchos círculos y los dirigentes autoritarios, de uno y otro color, estaban, en cambio, al alza. Churchill y Orwell, cada uno por su lado, fueron capaces de ver que lo que se hallaba en peligro era la libertad del ser humano y que, ya fuera comunista o fascista, un Gobierno que negaba a la población sus derechos constituía una amenaza contra la que había que luchar.

Los dos, uno en la arena política y el otro en el campo de las letras, demostraron en los años siguientes estar a la altura de los tiempos. Y aunque Churchill jugó un papel mayor en la derrota de Hitler y el Eje, Orwell creó con Rebelión en la granja y 1984 dos metáforas inmortales sobre los peligros del totalitarismo cuya influencia llega hasta hoy. Sus vidas, las de ambos, fueron un canto al poder de las convicciones morales, y al valor que se requiere para mantenerse fiel a ellas, contra viento y marea.

◆請試著看清眼前的世界◆

要自由、還是要奴役?

在這場戰鬥中,邱吉爾和歐威爾的遺產將是克敵制勝的法寶。

英國有史以來最偉大的人、二十世紀最重要的作家=C&O雙重傳記

▶謹 獻 給 所 有 努 力 捍 衛 自 由 的 人◀

┏—————————————————————————————————┓

《紐約時報》暢銷書、《紐約時報書評》年度百大好書  

特別收錄★余杰、黃春木——專文導讀   

★二十餘幅邱吉爾和歐威爾珍貴照片

┗—————————————————————————————————┛

《紐約時報書評》、《書單》、《舊金山紀事報》、《洛杉磯時報》、《西雅圖時報》、《出版者週刊》、《科克斯書評》、《新聞日報》、《基督科學箴言報》、《新政治家》、《明星論壇報》等各大媒體一致讚譽!


★★★★★

余 杰 作家及歷史學者

汪栢年 國立蘭陽女中歷史教師

沈旭暉 香港國際關係學者

林美香 國立政治大學歷史系教授

晏山農 文化工作者

黃春木 教育部師鐸獎得主、臺北市立建國高中歷史科教師

楊惟安 輔仁大學歷史學系助理教授

顏擇雅 出版人、作家________名家強力推薦(依姓氏筆畫排列)


余杰:「中國對西方文明和秩序已經構成嚴重威脅,危險程度超過了昔日的納粹德國和蘇俄。所以,雖然納粹德國和共產主義的蘇俄都已灰飛煙滅,但邱吉爾和歐威爾的逆耳忠言並不過時——『如自由真有什麼意義,那應該就是指把人們不想聽的說給他們聽。』」


Winston Churchill, 1874-1965|George Orwell, 1903-1950

這兩人究竟是什麼樣的人物?

他們是以什麼論述,為個人在現代生活中保留空間?

他們是如何得出那些觀點的?


▶▶時代的締造者,也是「最令人意想不到的盟友」

邱吉爾比歐威爾早二十八年出生,也比他多活了十五年。貴族出身的邱吉爾是精明的戰爭分析家、卓越的演說家,政治生涯雖曾遭逢低谷,但一直都是眾所矚目的焦點;來自中下階層的歐威爾,以社會觀察者的身分寫作,一生大部分時間其實默默無聞,直到生命後期才成為聞名遐邇的「歐威爾」。兩人的人生軌跡大相逕庭,但在交疊的關鍵歲月裡,他們都為同樣的重大問題而奮鬥——對抗極權主義、阻止國家謀殺的浪潮繼續高漲,並且把捍衛人類自由視為首要之務。


▶▶不僅為了理解他們的時代,也藉此了解我們自己的時代

一九三○年代末期,「民主」在許多圈子裡深受懷疑,甚至遭到揚棄,隨處可見威權統治者崛起。有些人雖不至於把希特勒和墨索里尼視為救世主,卻覺得是「可以打交道的對象」。相反地,邱吉爾和歐威爾深謀遠慮,一眼就看穿剝奪人民基本自由的政府是一股極權威脅,應當抵制。


儘管邱吉爾和歐威爾並未獲得大家的充分理解,被多數當代人所抨擊,但他們面臨歷史的關鍵時刻之際,秉持著先尋找事情的真相,然後才根據信念行事,最終都證明了他們是那個年代的必要人物。在普立茲獎得主湯瑪斯.瑞克斯(Thomas E. Ricks)的這本精彩的雙雄傳記中,他們的人生成了道德信念堅不可摧,以及堅持信念需要過人勇氣的最佳明證。



邱吉爾:

「我能盡心奉獻的別無他物,只有熱血、辛勞、眼淚和汗水。」

「如果這個島國的悠久歷史終究要結束,那只能結束在我們每個人都浴血搏鬥之後。」

「永不屈服,永不屈服,永遠永遠永遠不要屈服。除了對榮譽和理智的信念以外,永遠不要向任何事情屈服,不分事情的大小輕重,都不要屈服。絕不向蠻力屈服,絕不向敵人的壓倒性勢力屈服。」


歐威爾:

「自由若有意義的話,那是指你有權利告訴對方他不想聽的話。」

「邱吉爾升任首相……帶來了深遠的改變,這個國家終於醒過來、開始運作了。」

「政治語言……都是為了以假亂真,讓謀殺顯得合理,使空話聽來煞有介事。」

「轟炸不設防的村莊,把居民趕到荒郊野外,以機關槍掃射牛隻,用燃燒彈焚毀田舍:這就是所謂的『平定』。無數農民的家園遭到劫掠,他們被迫帶著隨身行李長途跋涉:這就是所謂的『人口遷移」或『邊境整頓」。人民無故入獄多年,或從後腦杓將他們槍決,或是把他們送到北極的勞改營,讓他們染上壞血病而過世,這就是所謂的『消除不可靠的因素』。」


透過認識兩人的人生歷程,我們或許會對現下這個忽略個體價值更變本加厲的時代,做好更完善的準備,就像他們靈活因應世界那樣。



【各界讚譽】

「美國作家湯瑪斯.瑞克斯將邱吉爾和歐威爾合在一起作傳,使得生前未曾謀面兩人彼此互補與對照,共同構成一部二十世紀人類尋求自由的精彩歷史。勇士的勇氣疊加起來,可以填海,可以移山,可以驚天地,可以泣鬼神。《邱吉爾與歐威爾》一書,比任何一本邱吉爾與歐威爾的單一的傳記都更扣人心弦。」

——余杰,作家及歷史學者


「邱吉爾與歐威爾留給世人最珍貴的啟示應該是尊重事實真相、勇於論證自己的觀點、不迴避問題、不迎合世俗、不畏強權。這等思辨與行動所針對的,優先是自己的國家,今後則必須再涵蓋讓我們享受無限便利與自由的資訊科技。『警覺通往極權的解放之路』,才是個體擁有自由的最佳證明。

「追求自由,從來都不是坦途,稍一自滿或自私,便可能走上極權的歧途,這正是生活在『自由已成為日常』的我們應該細讀《邱吉爾與歐威爾》最深刻的原因。」

——黃春木,教育部師鐸獎得主、臺北市立建國高中歷史科教師


「這部雙雄傳記使人不禁想問:當代的邱吉爾與歐威爾身在何方?」

——哈洛德.艾凡斯(Harold Evans),英國傳奇新聞工作者


「瑞克斯是出色的作家,其細膩的筆觸使這兩位充滿神話色彩的非凡人物躍然紙上。」

——基思.羅威(Keith Lowe),英國二戰史作家、《野蠻大陸:第二次世界大戰後的歐洲》作者


「在反對暴政的抗爭中,一對令人出乎意料的盟友……鼓舞人心的精彩故事。」

——安德魯.羅伯茲(Andrew Roberts),歷史學家、《邱吉爾:與命運同行》作者


「邱吉爾和歐威爾兩人從未謀面,但兩人相互輝映的人生、對社會運作的看法、對個人自由的主張、政治上受到的局限等等,在不同的地方抱持極其協調的想法,令人印象深刻。閱讀本書之前,我原本以為他倆並不相稱,結果恰恰相反,真是有趣。」

——約翰.勒卡雷(‎John le Carré),著名諜報小說家


「二十世紀中葉獨裁政權為一般大眾的靈魂而戰時,這兩人都是持續捍衛個人自由的鬥士……瑞克斯的成功之處在於他對細節的靈活掌握。」

——D.J.泰勒(D. J. Taylor),評論家、小說家和傳記作家


「精彩的閱讀饗宴……讓我們以全新的觀點回顧這些熟悉的人物。」

——約翰.葛雷(John Gray),書評家


「在這本引人入勝的精彩好書中,作者告訴我們,這兩個主角是『我們仍會想起的人,他們不僅對於理解他們那個時代很重要,也對於理解我們這個時代很重要』……在這本令人不忍釋卷的好書中,我們可以明顯感受到邱吉爾和歐威爾都非常重視思辨。」

——《紐約時報書評》


「以優雅的筆觸頌揚這兩人靠著道德勇氣,面對危及其生活方式的生存危機,並證明了獨立個體也可以發揮影響力。」

——《舊金山紀事報》


「瑞克斯把這兩人最失落的人生階段描寫得淋漓盡致……在最後一章中,瑞克斯受到邱吉爾的典範所啟發,並在歐威爾的政治理念加持下,為公民行動主義辯護。」

——《赫芬頓郵報》


「本書流暢好讀,鼓舞人心,也及時肯定了史學家西蒙.夏瑪(Simon Schama)所謂的「那個時代的締造者」。希望我輩之中,也有在智慧及道德勇氣上與他們兩人旗鼓相當的人士。」

——《明星論壇報》


「精彩地描述這兩人為捍衛自由民主所設下的標準,但令人不安的是,那些標準仍遙不可及。」

——《科克斯評論》星級評論


「這本書把邱吉爾和歐威爾塑造成為這個世界追求自由民主的英明人物……他們各自成了不同類型的英雄。」

——《圖書館評論》


「這本書充分說明了,邱吉爾和歐威爾在面對威權主義時,為道德和政治堅毅的必要性所做的持久堅持……對我們這個時代來說,這是一部振奮人心的作品。」

——《出版者週刊》


「這是一組令人矚目的配對:邱吉爾和歐威爾都是二十世紀的知名人物,瑞克斯以新鮮的觀點對這兩人做了比較和對比……在追蹤兩人的生平時,他並未落入常見的陷阱。他既不誇大歐威爾的高尚,也不過分推崇邱吉爾。」

——《新聞日報》


「瑞克斯的過人巧思在於,透過兩位偉大人物的生平來講述一個持續奮鬥的故事。」

——《書單》


「本書的讀者會意識到,保存及講述事實是一場非常漫長的奮鬥。」

——《洛杉磯時報》


「瑞克斯擅長講述故事的天賦,使這本書幾乎令人無法釋卷。」

——《基督科學箴言報》


「這本書的出版正是時候,讀來令人愛不釋手。」

——《密蘇里報》


「這本書讀來精彩萬分,以作者的成熟犀利評論見長。」

——《澳洲人報》




出版社 麥田 (城邦)

From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Fiasco and The Gamble comes an epic history of the decline of American military leadership from World War II to Iraq.

History has been kinder to the American generals of World War II—Marshall, Eisenhower, Patton, and Bradley—than to the generals of the wars that followed. Is this merely nostalgia? In The Generals, Thomas E. Ricks answers the question definitively: No, it is not—in no small part because of a widening gulf between performance and accountability. During the Second World War, scores of American generals were relieved of command simply for not being good enough. Today as one American colonel said bitterly during the Iraq War, “As matters stand now, a private who loses a rifle suffers far greater consequences than a general who loses a war.”

In The Generals we meet great leaders and suspect ones, generals who rose to the occasion and those who failed themselves and their soldiers. Marshall and Eisenhower cast long shadows over this story, but no single figure is more inspiring than Marine General O. P. Smith, whose fighting retreat from the Chinese onslaught into Korea in the winter of 1950 snatched a kind of victory from the jaws of annihilation. But Smith’s courage and genius in the face of one of the grimmest scenarios the marines have ever faced only cast the shortcomings of the people who put him there in sharper relief.

If Korea showed the first signs of a culture that neither punished mediocrity nor particularly rewarded daring, the Vietnam War saw American military leadership bottom out. The My Lai massacre is held up as the emblematic event of this dark chapter of our history.

In the wake of Vietnam, a battle for the soul of the US Army was waged with impressive success. It became a transformed institution, reinvigorated from the bottom up. But if the body was highly toned, its head still suffered from familiar problems, resulting in leadership that, from the first Iraq War through to the present, was tactically savvy but strategically obtuse—one that would win battles but would end wars badly.

Thomas E. Ricks has made a close study of America’s military leaders for three decades, and in his hands this story resounds with larger meaning: the transmission of values, strategic thinking, the difference between an organization that learns and one that fails. Military history of the highest quality, The Generals is also essential reading for anyone with an interest in the difference between good leaders and bad ones.

A New York Times bestseller!

A New York Times Book Review Notable Book of 2017

A dual biography of Winston Churchill and George Orwell, who preserved democracy from the threats of authoritarianism, from the left and right alike.

Both George Orwell and Winston Churchill came close to death in the mid-1930's—Orwell shot in the neck in a trench line in the Spanish Civil War, and Churchill struck by a car in New York City. If they'd died then, history would scarcely remember them. At the time, Churchill was a politician on the outs, his loyalty to his class and party suspect. Orwell was a mildly successful novelist, to put it generously. No one would have predicted that by the end of the 20th century they would be considered two of the most important people in British history for having the vision and courage to campaign tirelessly, in words and in deeds, against the totalitarian threat from both the left and the right. In a crucial moment, they responded first by seeking the facts of the matter, seeing through the lies and obfuscations, and then they acted on their beliefs. Together, to an extent not sufficiently appreciated, they kept the West's compass set toward freedom as its due north.

It's not easy to recall now how lonely a position both men once occupied. By the late 1930's, democracy was discredited in many circles, and authoritarian rulers were everywhere in the ascent. There were some who decried the scourge of communism, but saw in Hitler and Mussolini "men we could do business with," if not in fact saviors. And there were others who saw the Nazi and fascist threat as malign, but tended to view communism as the path to salvation. Churchill and Orwell, on the other hand, had the foresight to see clearly that the issue was human freedom—that whatever its coloration, a government that denied its people basic freedoms was a totalitarian menace and had to be resisted.

In the end, Churchill and Orwell proved their age's necessary men. The glorious climax of Churchill and Orwell is the work they both did in the decade of the 1940's to triumph over freedom's enemies. And though Churchill played the larger role in the defeat of Hitler and the Axis, Orwell's reckoning with the menace of authoritarian rule in Animal Farm and 1984 would define the stakes of the Cold War for its 50-year course, and continues to give inspiration to fighters for freedom to this day. Taken together, in Thomas E. Ricks's masterful hands, their lives are a beautiful testament to the power of moral conviction, and to the courage it can take to stay true to it, through thick and thin.

Churchill and Orwell is a perfect gift for the holidays!
Fiasco, Thomas E. Ricks’s #1 New York Times bestseller, transformed the political dialogue on the war in Iraq—The Gamble is the next news breaking installment

Thomas E. Ricks uses hundreds of hours of exclusive interviews with top officers in Iraq and extraordinary on-the-ground reportage to document the inside story of the Iraq War since late 2005 as only he can, examining the events that took place as the military was forced to reckon with itself, the surge was launched, and a very different war began.

Since early 2007 a new military order has directed American strategy. Some top U.S. officials now in Iraq actually opposed the 2003 invasion, and almost all are severely critical of how the war was fought from then through 2006. At the core of the story is General David Petraeus, a military intellectual who has gathered around him an unprecedented number of officers with both combat experience and Ph.D.s. Underscoring his new and unorthodox approach, three of his key advisers are quirky foreigners—an Australian infantryman-turned- anthropologist, an antimilitary British woman who is an expert in the Middle East, and a Mennonite-educated Palestinian pacifist.

The Gamble offers news-breaking account, revealing behind-the-scenes disagreements between top commanders. We learn that almost every single officer in the chain of command fought the surge. Many of Petraeus’s closest advisers went to Iraq extremely pessimistic, doubting that the surge would have any effect, and his own boss was so skeptical that he dispatched an admiral to Baghdad in the summer of 2007 to come up with a strategy to replace Petraeus’s. That same boss later flew to Iraq to try to talk Petraeus out of his planned congressional testimony. The Gamble examines the congressional hearings through the eyes of Petraeus and Ambassador Ryan Crocker, and their views of the questions posed by the 2008 presidential candidates.

For Petraeus, prevailing in Iraq means extending the war. Thomas E. Ricks concludes that the war is likely to last another five to ten years—and that that outcome is a best case scenario. His stunning conclusion, stated in the last line of the book, is that “the events for which the Iraq war will be remembered by us and by the world have not yet happened.”
©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.