Ebooks

Who is Jesus? This is the fundamental question for christology. The earliest Christians used various titles, most of them drawn from the Old Testament or Hebrew Scriptures, to express their faith in Jesus. They called him prophet, teacher, Messiah, Son of David, Son of Man, Lord, Son of God, Word of God, and occasionally even God. In Who Is Jesus?Thomas Rausch, S.J., focuses on the New Testament's rich variety of christologies.

Who Is Jesus?covers the three quests for the historical Jesus, the methods for retrieving the historical Jesus, the Jewish background, the Jesus movement, his preaching and ministry, death and resurrection, the various New Testament christologies, and the development of christological doctrine from the New Testament period to the Council of Chalcedon.

Chapters are The Three Quests for the Historical Jesus," *Methodological Considerations, - *The Jewish Background, - *Jesus and His Movement, - *The Preaching and Ministry of Jesus, - *The Death of Jesus, - *God Raised Him from the Dead, - *New Testament Christologies, - *From the New Testament to Chalcedon, - *Sin and Salvation, - and *A Contemporary Approach to Soteriology. -

Thomas P. Rausch, SJ, PhD, is the T. Marie Chilton Professor of Catholic Theology at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles. A specialist in ecclesiology, ecumenism, and the theology of the priesthood, he has published eight books including the award-winning Catholicism at the Dawn of the Third Millennium, The College Student's Introduction to Theology, andReconciling Faith and Reason: Apologists, Evangelists, and Theologians in a Divided Church, published by Liturgical Press.

"
What is Catholicism? And where is the Catholic Church headed in the third millennium? These two questions provide the structure for Thomas Rausch?s Catholicism in the Third Millennium. Here Rausch combines a faithful presentation of the tradition with a critical theological reflection and interpretation of where the Church is today and where it might be moving. Catholicism in the Third Millennium offers an appreciation of the forces and movements that have shaped, and continue to influence, the ongoing change and development of Roman Catholicism. Chief among these is the influence of the Second Vatican Council (1962-1965) in reshaping Catholicism. This revised edition includes updated text from Rausch?s Catholicism at the Dawn of the Third Millennium, particularly the final chapter on ?The Unfinished Agenda? of Vatican II. Each chapter concludes with focus questions developed by Catherine E. Clifford of St. Paul?s University, Ottawa. This experience of guided reading provides readers with a broad survey of Roman Catholic faith and practice in its contemporary context. For readers who wish to compare particular passages of this volume with the Catechism of the Catholic Church, an outline is provided in an appendix, with references to the appropriate sections of the Catechism. A second appendix offers a glossary of terms used in the book, while a third appendix lists a number of basic works for further investigation of Catholic faith and life. Chapters are ?The Church and the Council,? ?Faith and the Believing Community,? ?A Visible Church,? ?A Living Tradition,? ?Sacraments and Christian Initiation,? ?Christian Life and Discipleship,? ?Sin, Forgiveness, and Healing,? ?Sexual Morality and Social Justice,? ?Prayer and Spirituality,? ?The Fullness of Christian Hope,? and ?The Unfinished Agenda.? Includes Appendix I: Outlook of Book, with References to the Catechism of the Catholic Church, Appendix II: Glossary of Terms, and Appendix III: Basic Reference Works on Catholicism. An Index of Names, and an Index of Subjects are also included.?This book would be useful to teachers and administrators in Catholic schools, to participants in R.C.I.A. programs and, in general, to anyone seeking to learn how Catholics make sense of life today.? Studies in Religion?This book provides an excellent introduction to Catholicism and the Roman Catholic Church for those who want something different than adult catechisms or theological textbooks. It thoroughly covers the basic characteristics most people take for granted when dealing with Catholicism.? Theoforum?. . . invaluable as a learning resource for candidates enrolled in our certificate program for Catholic leadership in health, education, and social services. . . . Thomas Rausch?s accessible text, enhanced in its second edition by Catherine Clifford?s comprehensive questions and glossary, should be required reading for all Catholics over the age of 50 and strongly recommended for everyone else.? M.J. Marrocco Director of Continuing Education University of St. Michael?s College Toronto, Ontario?This second edition of Rausch?s extremely serviceable survey of Roman Catholic faith, ethics, and practice has been augmented with updated bibliographies, focus questions, and glossary to make the work even more user-friendly for those who desire an overview of the Roman Catholic Church. A useful appendix includes a three-page list of places where topics in the present text correlate with material found in the Catechism of the Catholic Church. . . . Rausch writes with clarity, which should make this work a fine first introduction to Catholicism for either classroom or adult education.? Theology Today?An expanded and updated version of Thomas Rausch?s well-received, Catholicism at the Dawn of the Third Millennium (1996), this volume is a welcome source for undergraduate classes and adult study groups. . . after receiving the review copy of Catholicism in the Third Millennium, I decided to adopt it as the basic text for my undergraduate course on Roman Catholicism. It will be interesting to see if my students react to it as positively as I did.? Catholic Studies Book Review
How should we understand church? Is it visible or invisible, one or many, local or universal, hierarchical or congregational in its structure, sacramental or biblical in its expression? Different Christians--whether Catholic, Protestant, Orthodox, or Evangelical--tend to approach these foundational questions through the lenses of their own histories and traditions. Some place great weight on the Church's Christological foundations, and thus on history. Others place more emphasis on the dynamic work of the Spirit, with its capacity to introduce the new and the unexpected. Others see an original diversity of ecclesiologies, grounding a contemporary pluralism of confessions. These lenses color not just how Christians see the church today, but also how they imagine it for tomorrow.

In Towards a Truly Catholic Church, Thomas Rausch, SJ, draws on these different voices to develop a theology for the church that builds on the work of the Vatican II, is ecumenical in its approach, and envisions the church in the context of globalization. In an increasingly interconnected world, Rausch offers hope that tomorrow's church will be a world church, a communion that reconciles unity in diversity.

Chapters areLumen Gentium, Gaudium et Spes, Metaphors and Models of Church, Communion in the Body of Christ, The Church's Apostolic Ministry, Safeguarding the Apostolic Tradition, The Marks of the Church, Reception and Communion, A Truly Catholic Church, Challenges to the Other Christian Churches, and Challenges to Roman Catholic Church.

Thomas P. Rausch, SJ, PhD, is the T. Marie Chilton Professor of Catholic Theology at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles. A specialist in ecclesiology, ecumenism, and the theology of the priesthood, he has published numerous books including the award-winning Catholicism at the Dawn of the Third Millennium, Who Is Jesus?, The College Student's Introduction to Theology, and Reconciling Faith and Reason: Apologists, Evangelists, and Theologians in a Divided Church, published by Liturgical Press.

In the spirit of nineteenth-century philosopher John Stuart Mill?s admonition to ?fully, frequently, and fearlessly? discuss what we profess to be true in order that it remain a ?living truth? rather than ?dead dogma,? Thomas P. Rausch gives us I Believe in God: A Reflection on the Apostles? Creed. Rausch carefully explores the controversies that led to the development of the Creed and thereby brings the Creed to life for modern readers. More importantly, he maintains that the Creed is most fully alive when those who profess it do so as a personal response to their baptismal call. I Believe in God carefully unpacks the three articles of the Creed but does so always with an eye and heart toward communion with God as Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. As baptized Christians, to profess the Creed is to be committed to enter more deeply into this trinitarian relationship and thus more fully into communion with one another. Rausch clearly shows that the Apostles? Creed is grounded in Scripture, first came to expression in the church?s baptismal liturgy, and can be better understood in light of contemporary theological reflection. Attentive to the ways in which the language of the Creed is relevant to the experience of twenty-first-century Christians, he leads us to understand what Pope Benedict meant when he said the Creed is ?a tiny summa in which everything essential is expressed.? With Rausch?s guidance, readers will confess those essentials with greater conviction and appreciation.?There is no better way to know what Catholics believe and why they believe it than to explore?line by line?the central affirmations of the faith. The ease with which Thomas Rausch unlaces the ancient language of the Creed for rank and file believers is truly edifying, indeed astonishing. I know of no finer study of the basics of Catholic faith than Rausch on the Creed.? Michael Downey Cardinal?s Theologian Archdiocese of Los Angeles?Thomas Rausch, like the good householder of the Gospel, brings forth old things and new. His exposition of the Apostles? Creed reveals both the perennial power latent in that ancient text as well as contemporary resources for recovering that power. This book is a crisply intelligent meditation of the faith of One, Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic Church.? Lawrence S. Cunningham John A. O?Brien Professor of Theology University of Notre Dame?I Believe in God uses the Apostles? Creed as its organizing tool for an insightful tour of a broad range of basic Catholic teachings. It can serve as text for college classes, catechumenate groups, adult parish discussions, or individuals wanting to keep up. Fr. Rausch writes in his usual clear and engaging manner to give his readers an accessible introduction to topics of substance and depth.? Dennis M. Doyle Religious Studies University of Dayton Dayton, Ohio ?With his trademark clarity, accessibility, and depth, Rausch helps us understand the essentials of our Christian faith in a church and world marked by polarization and conflict. I cannot think of any other book of this genre that probes with greater acumen and pastoral sensitivity the challenges that face Christianity, especially the American Catholic Church, today and retrieves from the old treasure of the Creed new insights to help us understand and live our Christian faith. Once more, we are in debt to Thomas Rausch for this rare theological gem. I most enthusiastically recommend this book for undergraduate classes and continuing education courses.? Dr. Peter C. Phan Ignacio Ellacuria Chair of Catholic Social Thought Georgetown University Washington, DC
How can Catholics find common ground in a divided Church, teaching and reflecting on their faith in a way that is at once critical, faithful to the Catholic tradition, and truly evangelical? In Reconciling Faith and Reason, Thomas Rausch, SJ, tackles academic theologians and the new conservative apologists, noting the strengths and liabilities of both. He looks at divisive questions of theological method, Scripture and doctrinal development, sexuality, liturgy, and evangelization, and concludes by proposing principles for doing theology in a divided Church.

Clergy and educated laity, especially lay ministers and religious educators, will find Reconciling Faith and Reason a good overview of present divisions in the Church and a practical source for finding a common ground in the life and concerns of ordinary Christians.

The first chapter traces the emergence and development of a renewed, yet overly academic Catholic theology. Chapter two focuses on the new apologists as a conservative reaction to the excesses of academic theology as well as to the changing nature of the Church. Chapter three, on Scripture, tradition, and Church, explores the relation of Scripture and tradition. Chapter four considers the question of the Church and sexuality. Chapter five focuses on liturgy and Eucharist. Chapter six assesses various efforts to express the Church's evangelical mission, both traditional and contemporary, and sketches the assumptions and concerns of a contemporary evangelical theology. The final chapter lifts up principles for doing theology in a divided church.

Chapters are A Divided Church," "Contemporary Catholic Theology," "The New Apologists," "Scripture Tradition, and Church," "Sexual Morality," "Eucharist and Theology," "A New Evangelization," and "Towards Common Ground in Theology."

Thomas P. Rausch, SJ, PhD, is professor of theology at Loyola Marymount University. He is the author of Catholicism at the Dawn of the Third Millennium, and editor of The College Student's Introduction to Theology, published by The Liturgical Press.

"
Catholic colleges and universities play a crucial role in handing on a rich faith tradition to young adults today. As these institutions have become more professional and pluralistic, many are asking how effective they are at carrying out the religious mission which is central to their identity: Are Catholic colleges and universities significantly different from less expensive state institutions or from other private colleges and universities? Are they still committed to the search for truth, which is really the search for God?

Thomas Rausch, an eminent educator, is a Catholic priest long interested in Catholic theology as a work of the church, not just of the academy. He insists we must also ask of Catholic higher education today:

Does it truly form students in the faith that does justice, or does it simply speed their passage into successful corporate lifestyles? Does it help students come to a personal encounter with the divine mystery revealed in Jesus?

Keeping these questions before them, Rausch and five other contributors to this volume provide wisdom, insight, and concrete examples of how Catholic higher education can indeed foster faith that leads to a more just world.

Thomas P. Rausch, SJ, is the T. Marie Chilton Professor of Catholic Theology at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles. He is author of numerous books, including I Believe in God: A Reflection on the Apostles' Creed, Being Catholic in a Culture of Choice, and Towards a Truly Catholic Church (Liturgical Press).

©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.