One of the most celebrated artists of Western art, the Post-Impressionist Vincent van Gogh created masterpieces that are now famous for their striking colour, emphatic brushwork and contoured forms.  Although the artist died in obscurity, his artworks would go on to change the course of modern art, powerfully influencing Expressionism and the works of leading artists. A first of its kind in digital print, the ‘Masters of Art’ series allows readers to explore the works of the world’s greatest artists in comprehensive detail. This volume presents the complete paintings and letters of the Dutch master. For all art lovers, this stunning collection offers a personal and unique digital portrait of one of the world’s greatest artists. (Version 2)

Features:
* the complete paintings of Vincent van Gogh — over 800 paintings, fully indexed and arranged in chronological order
* features a special ‘Highlights’ section, with concise introductions to the masterpieces, giving valuable contextual information
* beautiful 'detail' images, allowing you to explore van Gogh's celebrated works in detail
* numerous images relating to van Gogh’s life and works
* includes over 800 letters — explore the artist’s vast and scholarly correspondence with his brother Theo
* EVEN includes the detailed biography by van Gogh’s sister-in-law
* hundreds of images in stunning colour - highly recommended for tablets, iPhone and iPad users, or as a valuable reference tool on traditional eReaders
* UPDATED with improved and larger images

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CONTENTS:

The Highlights
STILL LIFE WITH CABBAGE AND CLOGS
AVENUE OF POPLARS IN AUTUMN
THE POTATO EATERS
SKULL WITH BURNING CIGARETTE
SELF-PORTRAIT WITH STRAW HAT
THE WHITE ORCHARD
PORTRAIT OF THE POSTMAN JOSEPH ROULIN
STILL LIFE: VASE WITH TWELVE SUNFLOWERS
VINCENT’S HOUSE IN ARLES (THE YELLOW HOUSE)
THE CAFÉ TERRACE ON THE PLACE DU FORUM, ARLES, AT NIGHT
PORTRAIT OF DR. GACHET
VINCENT’S BEDROOM IN ARLES
VINCENT’S CHAIR WITH HIS PIPE
THE RED VINEYARD
SELF-PORTRAIT WITH BANDAGED EAR
THE STARRY NIGHT
WHEAT FIELD WITH CYPRESSES
IRISES
WHEAT FIELD WITH CROWS

The Paintings
THE COMPLETE PAINTINGS
ALPHABETICAL LIST OF PAINTINGS

The Letters
THE CORRESPONDENCE OF VINCENT VAN GOGH

The Biography
MEMOIR OF VINCENT VAN GOGH by Johanna Gesina van Gogh

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Vincent van Gogh’s life and work are so intertwined that it is hardly possible to observe one without thinking of the other. Van Gogh has indeed become the incarnation of the suffering, misunderstood martyr of modern art, the emblem of the artist as an outsider. An article, published in 1890, gave details about van Gogh’s illness. The author of the article saw the painter as “a terrible and demented genius, often sublime, sometimes grotesque, always at the brink of the pathological.” Very little is known about Vincent’s childhood. At the age of eleven he had to leave “the human nest”, as he called it himself, for various boarding schools. The first portrait shows us van Gogh as an earnest nineteen year old. At that time he had already been at work for three years in The Hague and, later, in London in the gallery Goupil & Co. In 1874 his love for Ursula Loyer ended in disaster and a year later he was transferred to Paris, against his will. After a particularly heated argument during Christmas holidays in 1881, his father, a pastor, ordered Vincent to leave. With this final break, he abandoned his family name and signed his canvases simply “Vincent”. He left for Paris and never returned to Holland. In Paris he came to know Paul Gauguin, whose paintings he greatly admired. The self-portrait was the main subject of Vincent’s work from 1886c88. In February 1888 Vincent left Paris for Arles and tried to persuade Gauguin to join him. The months of waiting for Gauguin were the most productive time in van Gogh’s life. He wanted to show his friend as many pictures as possible and decorate the Yellow House. But Gauguin did not share his views on art and finally returned to Paris. On 7 January, 1889, fourteen days after his famous self-mutilation, Vincent left the hospital where he was convalescing. Although he hoped to recover from and to forget his madness, but he actually came back twice more in the same year. During his last stay in hospital, Vincent painted landscapes in which he recreated the world of his childhood. It is said that Vincent van Gogh shot himself in the side in a field but decided to return to the inn and went to bed. The landlord informed Dr Gachet and his brother Theo, who described the last moments of his life which ended on 29 July, 1890: “I wanted to die. While I was sitting next to him promising that we would try to heal him. [...], he answered, ‘La tristesse durera toujours (The sadness will last forever).’”
"In a picture I want to say something comforting as music is comforting," Vincent van Gogh confided to his friend and fellow artist, Emile Bernard. "I want to paint men and women with that something of the eternal which the halo used to symbolize and which we seek to give by the actual radiance and vibration of our colorings." Written in the years 1887 to 1889, these letters are among the most important and relevant sources of insight into van Gogh's life and art. Apart from their fascinating content, they are among the most sensitive and perceptive studies ever published about the man and the artist.
On his decision to make the letters public, Barnard commented, "After reading them one could not doubt his [van Gogh's] sincerity, his character, nor his originality; there, pulsating with life, one would find the whole of him." Indeed, these 23 letters, eloquently translated into English, radiate with their author's impulsiveness, intensity, and mysticism. In one van Gogh admits: "I can't disguise from you the fact that I like the country, having been brought up there — floods of memories of the past, aspirations towards that infinity, of which the sower and the sheaves are symbols, enchant me now as then. But I wonder when I'll get my starry sky done, a picture which haunts me always."
Complemented by handsome black-and-white reproductions of some of van Gogh's major paintings and facsimiles from his letters, this volume is essential reading for scholars and students of art and will be treasured by artists and art lovers alike.
This choice selection of beautifully reproduced drawings spans the full length of van Gogh's brief but prolific career. The works range from his early impressions of peasant life to drawings that served as studies for the great canvases he painted at the close of his life, including Landscape with Cypresses and Starry Night.
Van Gogh's quest to be "alone with nature" and with those whose lives were close to the land took him first to the desolate reaches of northern Holland and ultimately to the sunlit fields and villages of southern France. The drawings presented in this book record the life, the land, and the people he encountered; familiar images to us through his paintings, yet startlingly fresh in these lesser-known works in another medium. Themes include peasants in their fields and cottages, village gardens, fishing boats, the postman Roulin, a drawbridge, fields of grain, a self-portrait, the house he lived in, the room he slept in, and the courtyard of the hospital in Arles.
Van Gogh Drawings offers a beautiful and stirring collection of work, one that clearly displays the artist's powerful affinity for the drawing medium. During the last six years of his life, his most productive period, van Gogh produced approximately 700 drawings and 800 paintings. Virtually unknown at his death, he had sold only one of this astonishing number of works. Now, a century later, they number among the most universally admired and prized of man’s creative achievements. The drawings presented here, chosen from museums and private collections around the world, dramatically record the brief journey of his life and the unfolding of his genius. The captions, which draw heavily upon information provided by Jan Hulsker in The Complete Van Gogh, list subject, date, medium, dimensions (in centimeters, height before width), and the institutions in which they are located. 44 black-and-white illustrations.
Vincent van Gogh’s life and work are so intertwined that it is hardly possible to observe one without thinking of the other. Van Gogh has indeed become the incarnation of the suffering, misunderstood martyr of modern art, the emblem of the artist as an outsider. An article, published in 1890, gave details about van Gogh’s illness. The author of the article saw the painter as “a terrible and demented genius, often sublime, sometimes grotesque, always at the brink of the pathological.” Very little is known about Vincent’s childhood. At the age of eleven he had to leave “the human nest”, as he called it himself, for various boarding schools. The first portrait shows us van Gogh as an earnest nineteen year old. At that time he had already been at work for three years in The Hague and, later, in London in the gallery Goupil & Co. In 1874 his love for Ursula Loyer ended in disaster and a year later he was transferred to Paris, against his will. After a particularly heated argument during Christmas holidays in 1881, his father, a pastor, ordered Vincent to leave. With this final break, he abandoned his family name and signed his canvases simply “Vincent”. He left for Paris and never returned to Holland. In Paris he came to know Paul Gauguin, whose paintings he greatly admired. The self-portrait was the main subject of Vincent’s work from 1886c88. In February 1888 Vincent left Paris for Arles and tried to persuade Gauguin to join him. The months of waiting for Gauguin were the most productive time in van Gogh’s life. He wanted to show his friend as many pictures as possible and decorate the Yellow House. But Gauguin did not share his views on art and finally returned to Paris. On 7 January, 1889, fourteen days after his famous self-mutilation, Vincent left the hospital where he was convalescing. Although he hoped to recover from and to forget his madness, but he actually came back twice more in the same year. During his last stay in hospital, Vincent painted landscapes in which he recreated the world of his childhood. It is said that Vincent van Gogh shot himself in the side in a field but decided to return to the inn and went to bed. The landlord informed Dr Gachet and his brother Theo, who described the last moments of his life which ended on 29 July, 1890: “I wanted to die. While I was sitting next to him promising that we would try to heal him. [...], he answered, ‘La tristesse durera toujours (The sadness will last forever).’”
La vida y obra de Vincent van Gogh están tan entremezcladas que es prácticamente imposible observar una sin pensar en la otra. Van Gogh se ha convertido en la encarnación del sufrimiento, en el mártir incomprendido del arte moderno, el emblema del artista como alguien ajeno. En 1890 se publicó un artículo que daba detalles acerca de la enfermedad de van Gogh. Su autor consideraba que el pintor era “un genio demente y terrible, con frecuencia sublime, en ocasiones grotesco, siempre al borde de lo patológico”. Se sabe muy poco de la niñez de Vincent. A la edad de once años, tuvo que abandonar “el nido humano”, como lo llamaba él mismo, para ir a vivir a una serie de escuelas con internado. Su primer retrato nos muestra a van Gogh como un joven serio de diecinueve años. Para entonces ya llevaba tres años trabajando en La Haya y posteriormente trabajó también en Londres, en la galería Goupil & Co. En 1874, su amor por Ursula Loyer terminó en desastre y un año después, fue transferido a París en contra de su voluntad. Después de una discusión particularmente acalorada durante las vacaciones navideñas, en 1881, su padre, que era pastor, ordenó a Vincent que se marchara. Con esta ruptura final, decidió dejar de lado su apellido y comenzó a firmar sus lienzos simplemente con “Vincent”. Se marchó a París y jamás volvió a Holanda. En París conoció a Paul Gauguin, cuyas pinturas admiraba mucho. De 1886 a 1888, el autorretrato fue el principal tema de la obra de Vincent. En febrero de 1888, Vincent dejó París; se marchó para Arles y trató de convencer a Gauguin de que hiciera lo mismo. Los meses durante los cuales esperó que llegara Gauguin fueron los más productivos de la vida de van Gogh. Quería mostrarle a su amigo tantos cuadros como le fuera posible y decorar la Casa Amarilla. Sin embargo, Gauguin no compartía sus puntos de vista artísticos y finalmente volvió a París. El 7 de enero de 1889, catorce días después de su famosa auto mutilación, Vincent dejó el hospital donde convalecía. Aunque esperaba recuperarse y olvidar su locura, de hecho volvió al hospital dos veces más ese mismo año. Durante su última estancia en el hospital, Vincent pintó paisajes en los que recreó el mundo de su niñez. Se dice que Vincent van Gogh se disparó en un costado, mientras estaba en el campo, pero decidió volver a la posada y acostarse a dormir. El dueño de la casa le informó al Dr. Gachet y a su hermano Theo, quien describió los últimos momentos de su vida, que se extinguió el 29 de julio de 1890: “Tenía ganas de morir. Mientras estaba sentado a su lado, prometiéndole que trataríamos de curarlo [...], él me respondió, ‘La tristesse durera toujours’ (La tristeza durará para siempre)”.
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