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Now updated with new material, the groundbreaking history of how police forces have become militarized, both in equipment and mindset, and what that means for American democracy.
The last days of colonialism taught America's revolutionaries that soldiers in the streets bring conflict and tyranny. As a result, our country has generally worked to keep the military out of law enforcement. But according to investigative reporter Radley Balko, over the last several decades, America's cops have increasingly come to resemble ground troops. The consequences have been dire: the home is no longer a place of sanctuary, the Fourth Amendment has been gutted, and police today have been conditioned to see the citizens they serve as an other-an enemy.
Today's armored-up policemen are a far cry from the constables of early America. The unrest of the 1960s brought about the invention of the SWAT unit-which in turn led to the debut of military tactics in the ranks of police officers. Nixon's War on Drugs, Reagan's War on Poverty, Clinton's COPS program, the post-9/11 security state under Bush, Obama: by degrees, each of these innovations empowered police forces, always at the expense of civil liberties. And under Trump, these powers were expanded in terrifying new ways, as evidenced by the tanks and overwhelming force that met the Black Lives Matter protesters in 2020.

In Rise of the Warrior Cop, Balko shows how politicians' ill-considered policies and relentless declarations of war against vague enemies like crime, drugs, and terror have blurred the distinction between cop and soldier. His fascinating, frightening narrative shows how over a generation, a creeping battlefield mentality has isolated and alienated American police officers and put them on a collision course with the values of a free society.
The hidden history of the FBI and its hundred-year war against terrorists, spies, and anyone it deemed subversive—including even American presidents.
 
NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • NOW A SHOWTIME ORIGINAL DOCUMENTARY SERIES
 
“Turns the long history of the FBI into a story that is as compelling, and important, as today’s headlines.”—Jeffrey Toobin, author of American Heiress
 
Enemies is the first definitive history of the FBI’s secret intelligence operations, from an author whose work on the Pentagon and the CIA won him the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award.
 
We think of the FBI as America’s police force. But secret intelligence is the Bureau’s first and foremost mission. The FBI’s secret intelligence and surveillance techniques have created a tug-of-war between national security and civil liberties, a tension that strains the very fabric of a free republic. Enemies is the story of how presidents have used the FBI to conduct political warfare—and how it has sometimes been turned against them. And it is the story of how the Bureau became the most powerful intelligence service the United States possesses.

Named One of the Best Books of the Year by The Washington Post, New York Daily News, and Slate

“Pulitzer Prize–winning author Tim Weiner has written a riveting inside account of the FBI’s secret machinations that goes so deep into the Bureau’s skulduggery, readers will feel they are tapping the phones along with J. Edgar Hoover. This is a book that every American who cares about civil liberties should read.”—Jane Mayer, author of Dark Money

“Outstanding.”The New York Times

“Absorbing . . . a sweeping narrative that is all the more entertaining because it is so redolent with screw-ups and scandals.”Los Angeles Times

“Fascinating.”The Wall Street Journal

“Important and disturbing . . . with all the verve and coherence of a good spy thriller.”—The New York Times Book Review

“Exciting and fast-paced.”The Daily Beast
From a New York Times–bestselling author: An account of the murder case and coerced confession that led to the birth of Miranda rights—“Unfailingly riveting” (Vincent Bugliosi).
 
It was a muggy summer day in 1963 when Janice Wylie and Emily Hoffert were murdered in their apartment on New York City’s Upper East Side. Months passed before police arrested George Whitmore Jr., and he confessed to the crime. But his incarceration would entail a host of shocking law enforcement missteps and cover-ups.
 
In this insider account, attorney and New York Times–bestselling author Robert K. Tanenbaum delivers a page-turning, real-life thriller about this historic case—from the brutal crime to the wrenching conviction, which forever reformed the American justice system. Echoes of My Soul chronicles both the infamous “Career Girls Murders” and the aftermath that ultimately led to the Supreme Court’s Miranda decision, as well as the abolition of the death penalty in New York State.
 
This is “the most powerful story of American justice in our time”—a true account of two brutal murders, the innocent man convicted of the crime, and the young DA who refused to give up until justice was served (Linda Fairstein).
 
“Thrilling and insightful.” —Publishers Weekly
 
“Many of the elements of the narrative are inherently fascinating: the circumstances of the crimes in Manhattan and Brooklyn, the police investigations, the prosecutors’ deliberations and the courtroom dramatics . . . A nonfiction murder mystery, an intriguing saga.” —Kirkus Reviews
Al Sheppard was on the front lines of the most difficult job in police work. E-Men risk their lives every day in many different ways. They are great cops, and Als memoir is right on the mark.
Detective Sgt. Joseph Coffey, NYPD, Ret., Author of The Coffey Files

Sheppard served in the NYPD during the urban warfare years and received his Baptism of Fire at the Williamsburg Siege. He was a decorated hero of the NYPD and member of the elite Emergency Service Unit (ESU). In his book E-Man, Al takes the reader on a non-stop roller coaster ride of emotions as he reveals life on the streets through the eyes of a combatant during the turbulent times and the work of the Emergency Service Unitthe same unit that the police call when they need help.
Detective Lt. Vern Gelbreth, NYPD, Homicide Commander

Al Sheppard is the REAL DEAL, and E-Man chronicles his years in the NYPDs Emergency Service Unit with heart-pounding excitement. Sheppard was on the front lines during the era of Vietnam, Black Power, and the Urban Drug Wars, and he survived it all to tell the tale in a book rich with insiders detail and a wry sense of humor. E-Man is the best New York cop book to come down the pike since The French Connection.
T.J. English, Author of Paddy Whacked and The Westies

E-Man is the breathtaking and sometimes heartbreaking memoir of one of New Yorks legendary emergency service cops. For 10 years Al Sheppard sped through the crowded New York streets to come to the aid of civilians and other police officers, always putting their needs ahead of his. E-Man is a story of adventure, courage and love.

In Black Rage in New Orleans, Leonard N. Moore traces the shocking history of police corruption in the Crescent City from World War II to Hurricane Katrina and the concurrent rise of a large and energized black opposition to it. In New Orleans, crime, drug abuse, and murder were commonplace, and an underpaid, inadequately staffed, and poorly trained police force frequently resorted to brutality against African Americans. Endemic corruption among police officers increased as the city's crime rate soared, generating anger and frustration among New Orleans's black community. Rather than remain passive, African Americans in the city formed antibrutality organizations, staged marches, held sit-ins, waged boycotts, vocalized their concerns at city council meetings, and demanded equitable treatment.

Moore explores a staggering array of NOPD abuses—police homicides, sexual violence against women, racial profiling, and complicity in drug deals, prostitution rings, burglaries, protection schemes, and gun smuggling—and the increasingly vociferous calls for reform by the city's black community. Documenting the police harassment of civil rights workers in the 1950s and 1960s, Moore then examines the aggressive policing techniques of the 1970s, and the attempts of Ernest "Dutch" Morial—the first black mayor of New Orleans—to reform the force in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Even when the department hired more African American officers as part of that reform effort, Moore reveals, the corruption and brutality continued unabated in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

Dramatic changes in departmental leadership, together with aid from federal grants, finally helped professionalize the force and achieved long-sought improvements within the New Orleans Police Department. Community policing practices, increased training, better pay, and a raft of other reform measures for a time seemed to signal real change in the department. The book's epilogue, "Policing Katrina," however, looks at how the NOPD's ineffectiveness compromised its ability to handle the greatest natural disaster in American history, suggesting that the fruits of reform may have been more temporary than lasting.

The first book-length study of police brutality and African American protest in a major American city, Black Rage in New Orleans will prove essential for anyone interested in race relations in America's urban centers.
Any professional actively engaged in the executive protection field, novice or veteran, whether in a team or as team leader, must train for, and be able to pinpoint, even the most unexpected security concerns. The continuation of The Fine Art of Executive Protection - Handbook for the Executive Protection Officer (2007), Advanced Skills in Executive Protection contains carefully selected and illustrated material for the executive protection and security enforcement professional. All available training and study material, individual case studies, and real scenarios, combined with professional experience, serve as the foundation for this specialist's manual. For the client, as a prospective principal, it provides important details that will assure lifesaving protection. Comprehensive, detailed, and straightforward, Advanced Skills in Executive Protection is the only book to offer an in-depth look into the operational aspects of executive protection. It guides the reader through a diversity of advanced disciplines and skills and contains all the necessary ingredients for effective protection planning. Information about every aspect of executive protection is not only an important part of the professional's ongoing training curriculum, but is also crucial for the client who seeks this professional protection, to face not only today's protection needs, but also those of the future. See also The Fine Art of Executive Protection: Handbook for the Executive Protection Officer and Understanding International Counter Terrorism: A Professional s Guide to the Operational Art by A. Hunsicker.
Criminal Interdiction is a book for the patrol officer who wants to perform their profession more efficiently. Future officers, students, and the general public can learn about how and why we do certain things in this countries war on crime.
The focus of interdiction has always been perceived as illegal drugs, but this is just one category in many. The name Criminal Interdiction says a lot. We can make a difference by making our communities a safer place to live.
Criminal Interdiction is written by one of the most experienced interdiction officers in the country today. It is not a tell all book, but a guide we can all use to come home safely. Safety is the lead component as you will learn to quickly recognize the dangers of the people who are encountered. Be there as criminals are identified, stopped, the questions are asked, and the body language is recognized.
Steve is a State Trooper with the Florida Highway Patrol. He has worked for the FHP for over 28 years. For the last 26 years, he has worked in the Patrols Contraband Interdiction Program as both an interdiction officer and a K-9 officer. He is a certified instructor for the agency in various areas.
Steve was a part of FHP's interdiction pilot program which began in 1983. Almost his entire career has been involved in criminal interdiction. Although he is assigned in Florida, he has worked with and assisted the Texas DPS in the Valley, the U.S. Border Patrol and U.S. Customs Inspectors in various regions of the border in Texas and New Mexico.
Steve taught as an adjunct instructor for three years for the MCTFT program through St. Petersburg College. He has taught officers in nearly every state of the union courses in highway interdiction and body language.
Mexico is in a state of siege. Since President Felipe Calderon declared a war on drugs in December 2006, more than 38,000 Mexican have been murdered. During the same period, drug money has infused over $130 billion into Mexico's economy, now the country's single largest source of income. Corruption and graft infiltrate all levels of government. Entire towns have become ungovernable, and of every 100 people killed, Mexican police now only investigate approximately five.

But the market is booming: In 2009, more people in the United States bought recreational drugs than ever before. In 2009, the United Nations reported that some $350 billion in drug money had been successfully laundered into the global banking system the prior year, saving it from collapse.

How does an "extra" $350 billion in the global economy affect the murder rate in Mexico? To get the story and connect the dogs, acclaimed journalist John Gibler travels across Mexico and slips behind the frontlines to talk with people who live in towns under assault: newspaper reporters and crime-beat photographers, funeral parlor workers, convicted drug traffickers, government officials, cab drivers and others who find themselves living on the lawless frontiers of the drug war. Gibler tells hair-raising stories of wild street battles, kidnappings, narrow escapes, politicians on the take, and the ordinary people who fight for justice as they seek solutions to the crisis that is tearing Mexico apart. Fast-paced and urgent, To Die in Mexico is an extraordinary look inside the raging drug war, and its global implications.

John Gibler is a writer based in Mexico and California, the author of Mexico Unconquered: Chronicles of Power and Revolt (City Lights Books, 2009) and a contributor to País de muertos: Crónicas contra la impunidad (Random House Mondadori, 2011). He is a correspondent for KPFA in San Francisco and has published in magazines in the United States and Mexico, including Left Turn, Z Magazine, Earth Island Journal, ColorLines, Race, Poverty, the Environment Fifth Estate, New Politics, In These Times, Yes! Magazine, Contralínea and Milenio Semanal.

"Gibler's front-line reportage coupled with first-rate analysis gives an uncommonly vivid and nuanced picture of a society riddled and enervated by corruption, shootouts, and raids, where murder is the 'most popular method of conflict resolution.' . . . At great personal risk, the author unearths stories the mainstream media doesn't—or is it too afraid—to cover, and gives voice to those who have been silenced or whose stories have been forgotten."—Publishers Weekly, starred review

"Gibler argues passionately to undercut this 'case study in failure.' The drug barons are only getting richer, the murders mount and the police and military repression expand as 'illegality increases the value of the commodity.' With legality, both U.S. and Mexican society could address real issues of substance abuse through education and public-health initiatives. A visceral, immediate and reasonable argument."—Kirkus Reviews

"Gibler provides a fascinating and detailed insight into the history of both drug use in the US and the 'war on drugs' unleashed by Ronald Reagan through the very plausible—but radical—lens of social control. . . . Throughout this short but powerful book, Gibler accompanies journalists riding the grim carousel of death on Mexico's streets, exploring the realities of a profession under siege in states such as Sinaloa and just how they cover the drugs war."—Gavin O’Toole, The Latin American Review of Books

If you spent your childhood reading detective novels and thinking how amazing it would be to start your own, or if you just decided it is time to retire from your current job in the police, military, or other investigative agency and start your own company, the concept of owning and operating your own Private Investigation Business is probably very enticing. With a massive upside and potential for growth, the industry has been booming for years. With all self-employment opportunities up and private investigation in particular up by more than 16% according to the IRS statistics on small businesses, now is the time to get into the industry.

This book was written for anyone who has looked at the idea of private investigation and decided that it would be ideal for them. You will learn everything you need to know about working in the private investigation field, starting with the basics of what you can expect and what preconceptions you may have that are just Hollywood fancy. You will learn how to choose a niche of investigation and how to start thinking in the abstract, questioning everything but recognizing facts for what they are. You will learn the key differences between a private investigator and a police officer and why those who want to be the latter should consider all their options before getting into private work. You will learn how to investigate a case and how to perform all of your necessary actions legally. Whether you will be operating out of your home or you are looking to buy or rent office space, this book can help you with a wealth of start-up information, from how to form and name your business to deciding if this will be a joint venture or if you would rather work solo.

Valuable information on forming a Partnership, LLC, Corporation, or becoming a Sole Proprietor, the four types of business formations, is included, and also the legal implications of each. This complete manual will arm you with everything you need, including sample business forms; contracts; worksheets and checklists for planning, opening, and running day-to-day operations; lists; plans and layouts; and dozens of other valuable, timesaving tools of the trade that no business owner should be without.

While providing detailed instruction and examples, the author leads you through every detail that will bring success. You will learn how to draw up a winning business plan (the companion CD-ROM has the actual business plan you can use in Microsoft Word) and about basic cost control systems, copyright and trademark issues, branding, management, legal concerns, sales and marketing techniques, and pricing formulas. You will learn how to hire and keep a qualified professional staff, meet IRS requirements, manage and train employees, generate high profile public relations and publicity, and implement low cost internal marketing ideas. You will learn how to build your business by using low and no cost ways to satisfy customers, and also ways to increase sales, have customers refer others to you, and thousands of excellent tips and useful guidelines. You will learn how to hire contractors to help you and which licenses and liability insurance you will need. You will learn which contracts and forms, including privacy agreements, you must have on hand and which business structure is best for you.

You will learn how to find clients and what tools you need, including the right camera and lenses. You will learn how modern computer equipment can accent your investigations and how to start using internet searches through public records, private databases and courthouse records to speed up the process. Learn how to perform background investigations, interviews, and surveillance and what the basics of each kind of investigation entails. The companion CD-ROM is included with the print version of this book; however is not available for download with the electronic version. It may be obtained separately by contacting Atlantic Publishing Group at sales@atlantic-pub.com

Atlantic Publishing is a small, independent publishing company based in Ocala, Florida. Founded over twenty years ago in the company president's garage, Atlantic Publishing has grown to become a renowned resource for non-fiction books. Today, over 450 titles are in print covering subjects such as small business, healthy living, management, finance, careers, and real estate. Atlantic Publishing prides itself on producing award winning, high-quality manuals that give readers up-to-date, pertinent information, real-world examples, and case studies with expert advice. Every book has resources, contact information, and web sites of the products or companies discussed.

How did the United States go from being a country that tries to rehabilitate street criminals and prevent white-collar crime to one that harshly punishes common lawbreakers while at the same time encouraging corporate crime through a massive deregulation of business? Why do street criminals get stiff prison sentences, a practice that has led to the disaster of mass incarceration, while white-collar criminals, who arguably harm more people, get slaps on the wrist--if they are prosecuted at all? In Who Are the Criminals?, one of America's leading criminologists provides new answers to these vitally important questions by telling how the politicization of crime in the twentieth century transformed and distorted crime policymaking and led Americans to fear street crime too much and corporate crime too little.

John Hagan argues that the recent history of American criminal justice can be divided into two eras--the age of Roosevelt (roughly 1933 to 1973) and the age of Reagan (1974 to 2008). A focus on rehabilitation, corporate regulation, and the social roots of crime in the earlier period was dramatically reversed in the later era. In the age of Reagan, the focus shifted to the harsh treatment of street crimes, especially drug offenses, which disproportionately affected minorities and the poor and resulted in wholesale imprisonment. At the same time, a massive deregulation of business provided new opportunities, incentives, and even rationalizations for white-collar crime--and helped cause the 2008 financial crisis and subsequent recession.

The time for moving beyond Reagan-era crime policies is long overdue, Hagan argues. The understanding of crime must be reshaped and we must reconsider the relative harms and punishments of street and corporate crimes.

The number of incidents and crimes carried out by terrorists and criminals, such as physical threats, violent attacks, assassinations, kidnapping and hostage situations are increasing by the minute worldwide. Each incident is a constant and ever demanding challenge to the law enforcement and the personal security professionals in particular. A detailed, but understandable manual for the Executive Protection Officer is a priority and the answer to those challenging situations. The Fine Art of Executive Protection is a detailed, but understandable manual for the Executive Protection Officer providing answers to those challenging situations. Information about every aspect of executive protection is not only an important part of the professional's training curriculum, but plays also a vital role for the client, who seeks protection. This manual will provide a clear view of all aspects not only for the professional, but also for prospect clients. To make sure of this all available training and study material, individual case studies and real scenarios combined with professional experience served as a foundation for this specialist's manual. The Fine Art of Executive Protection in its comprehensive and straight- forward form will guide the reader through the diversity of disciplines and skills, which are essential for any professional of the executive protection and private security sector. This book provides detailed information and knowledge, necessary and indispensable not only for the novice, but also for the experienced executive protection professional. It provides the clear knowledge and a thorough understanding of the characteristics, diversity and demands of this profession. It contains all the essential ingredients, necessary for an effective protection planning and successful service, demanded by any executive protection specialist. Providing all the tools, techniques and applications needed for this specific job, it also shall motivate some talents, which may need to be developed further and to face not only today's protection needs, but also those of the future. The book not only contains detailed professional information for the person seeking a post in the "glamorous world" of the executive protection- business but also provides all the information necessary for those under threat and in need of close protection and a secure environment. A protection- seeking client will find detailed information about Executive Protection and Physical Security. Executive or Personal Protection, was once considered a service only and exclusive for the rich, famous and a few selected government officials. But recent events and an increase in violence, quickly transformed Executive Protection into a sought after service- commodity worldwide. Keeping this in mind, any part of this guide is therefore easily adaptable and adjusted to any region or country in the world. However, one must carefully consider and act within the local laws to assure a successful protection service.
An intimate look at Robert Mueller, the sixth Director of the FBI, who oversaw the investigation into ties between President Trump's campaign and Russian officials.

Covering more than 30 years of history, from the 1980s through Obama's presidency, The Threat Matrix explores the transformation of the FBI from a domestic law enforcement agency, handling bank robberies and local crimes, into an international intelligence agency -- with more than 500 agents operating in more than 60 countries overseas -- fighting extremist terrorism, cyber crimes, and, for the first time, American suicide bombers.

Based on access to never-before-seen task forces and FBI bases from Budapest, Hungary, to Quantico, Virginia, this book profiles the visionary agents who risked their lives to bring down criminals and terrorists both here in the U.S. and thousands of miles away long before the rest of the country was paying attention to terrorism. Given unprecedented access, thousands of pages of once secret documents, and hundreds of interviews, Garrett M. Graff takes us inside the FBI and its attempt to protect America from the Munich Olympics in 1972 to the attempted Times Square bombing in 2010. It also tells the inside story of the FBI's behind-the-scenes fights with the CIA, the Department of Justice, and five White Houses over how to combat terrorism, balance civil liberties, and preserve security. The book also offers a never-before-seen intimate look at FBI Director Robert Mueller, the most important director since Hoover himself.

Brilliantly reported and suspensefully told, The Threat Matrix peers into the darkest corners of this secret war and will change your view of the FBI forever.
How did the United States go from being a country that tries to rehabilitate street criminals and prevent white-collar crime to one that harshly punishes common lawbreakers while at the same time encouraging corporate crime through a massive deregulation of business? Why do street criminals get stiff prison sentences, a practice that has led to the disaster of mass incarceration, while white-collar criminals, who arguably harm more people, get slaps on the wrist--if they are prosecuted at all? In Who Are the Criminals?, one of America's leading criminologists provides new answers to these vitally important questions by telling how the politicization of crime in the twentieth century transformed and distorted crime policymaking and led Americans to fear street crime too much and corporate crime too little.


John Hagan argues that the recent history of American criminal justice can be divided into two eras--the age of Roosevelt (roughly 1933 to 1973) and the age of Reagan (1974 to 2008). A focus on rehabilitation, corporate regulation, and the social roots of crime in the earlier period was dramatically reversed in the later era. In the age of Reagan, the focus shifted to the harsh treatment of street crimes, especially drug offenses, which disproportionately affected minorities and the poor and resulted in wholesale imprisonment. At the same time, a massive deregulation of business provided new opportunities, incentives, and even rationalizations for white-collar crime--and helped cause the 2008 financial crisis and subsequent recession.


The time for moving beyond Reagan-era crime policies is long overdue, Hagan argues. The understanding of crime must be reshaped and we must reconsider the relative harms and punishments of street and corporate crimes. In a new afterword, Hagan assesses Obama's policies regarding the punishment of white-collar and street crimes and debates whether there is any evidence of a significant change in the way our country punishes them.
Introduction to Security, Seventh Edition, presents the latest in security issues from security equipment and design theory to security management practice. This complete revision of the classic textbook has been reorganized to reflect the industry changes since the 9/11 World Trade Center attacks.

It includes new coverage throughout of terrorism as it relates to cargo and travel security, potential areas of attack and target hardening techniques, and the use of current technologies to combat new threats.

The book begins with a new chapter on the development of Homeland Security in the United States. Traditional physical and guard security is covered in addition to advances in the electronic and computer security areas, including biometric security, access control, CCTV surveillance advances, as well as the growing computer security issues of identity theft and computer fraud.

The Seventh Edition provides the most comprehensive breakdown of security issues for the student while detailing the latest trends, legislation, and technology in the private and government sectors for real-world application in students' future careers. As the definitive resource for anyone entering or currently working in the security industry, this book will also benefit law enforcement personnel, security consultants, security managers, security guards and other security professionals, and individuals responsible for Homeland Security.

* Examines the attacks of September 11th, 2001 and the lasting impact on the security industry
* Expanded figures and photographs support new coverage of emerging security issues
* Recommended reading for the American Society for Industrial Security's (ASIS) Certified Protection Professional (CPP) and Physical Security Professional (PSP) exams
The Professional Protection Officer: Security Strategies, Tactics and Trends, Second Edition, is the definitive reference and instructional text for career oriented security officers in both the private and public sectors. The first edition originated with the birth of the International Foundation for Protection Officers (IFPO) in 1988, which has been using the book as the official text since that time. Each subsequent edition has brought new and enlightened information to the protection professional. The material in this new edition includes all of the subjects essential to training of protection professionals, and has been updated to reflect new strategies, tactics, and trends in this dynamic field.

Written by leading security educators, trainers and consultants, this valuable resource has served as the definitive text for both students and professionals worldwide. This new edition adds critical updates and fresh pedagogy, as well as new diagrams, illustrations, and self assessments. The Professional Protection Officer: Security Strategies, Tactics and Trends is tailored to the training and certification needs of today’s protection professionals and proves to be the most exciting and progressive edition yet.

  • Information included is designed to reflect the latest trends in the industry and to support and reinforce continued professional development.
  • Concludes chapters with an Emerging Trends feature, laying the groundwork for the future growth of this increasingly vital profession.
  • Written by a cross-disciplinary contributor team consisting of top experts in their respective fields.
A New York Times bestseller
Now also an Oscar-nominated documentary


In Dirty Wars, Jeremy Scahill, author of the New York Times bestseller Blackwater, takes us inside America's new covert wars. The foot soldiers in these battles operate globally and inside the United States with orders from the White House to do whatever is necessary to hunt down, capture or kill individuals designated by the president as enemies.

Drawn from the ranks of the Navy SEALs, Delta Force, former Blackwater and other private security contractors, the CIA's Special Activities Division and the Joint Special Operations Command ( JSOC), these elite soldiers operate worldwide, with thousands of secret commandos working in more than one hundred countries. Funded through "black budgets," Special Operations Forces conduct missions in denied areas, engage in targeted killings, snatch and grab individuals and direct drone, AC-130 and cruise missile strikes. While the Bush administration deployed these ghost militias, President Barack Obama has expanded their operations and given them new scope and legitimacy.

Dirty Wars follows the consequences of the declaration that "the world is a battlefield," as Scahill uncovers the most important foreign policy story of our time. From Afghanistan to Yemen, Somalia and beyond, Scahill reports from the frontlines in this high-stakes investigation and explores the depths of America's global killing machine. He goes beneath the surface of these covert wars, conducted in the shadows, outside the range of the press, without effective congressional oversight or public debate. And, based on unprecedented access, Scahill tells the chilling story of an American citizen marked for assassination by his own government.

As US leaders draw the country deeper into conflicts across the globe, setting the world stage for enormous destabilization and blowback, Americans are not only at greater risk -- we are changing as a nation. Scahill unmasks the shadow warriors who prosecute these secret wars and puts a human face on the casualties of unaccountable violence that is now official policy: victims of night raids, secret prisons, cruise missile attacks and drone strikes, and whole classes of people branded as "suspected militants." Through his brave reporting, Scahill exposes the true nature of the dirty wars the United States government struggles to keep hidden.
America is in trouble. We face four major challenges on which our future depends, and we are failing to meet them—and if we delay any longer, soon it will be too late for us to pass along the American dream to future generations.
In That Used to Be Us, Thomas L. Friedman, one of our most influential columnists, and Michael Mandelbaum, one of our leading foreign policy thinkers, offer both a wake-up call and a call to collective action. They analyze the four challenges we face—globalization, the revolution in information technology, the nation's chronic deficits, and our pattern of excessive energy consumption—and spell out what we need to do now to sustain the American dream and preserve American power in the world. They explain how the end of the Cold War blinded the nation to the need to address these issues seriously, and how China's educational successes, industrial might, and technological prowess remind us of the ways in which "that used to be us." They explain how the paralysis of our political system and the erosion of key American values have made it impossible for us to carry out the policies the country urgently needs.
And yet Friedman and Mandelbaum believe that the recovery of American greatness is within reach. They show how America's history, when properly understood, offers a five-part formula for prosperity that will enable us to cope successfully with the challenges we face. They offer vivid profiles of individuals who have not lost sight of the American habits of bold thought and dramatic action. They propose a clear way out of the trap into which the country has fallen, a way that includes the rediscovery of some of our most vital traditions and the creation of a new thirdparty movement to galvanize the country.
That Used to Be Us is both a searching exploration of the American condition today and a rousing manifesto for American renewal.
NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY
The New York Times Book Review • The Economist • The Christian Science Monitor • Bloomberg Businessweek • The Globe and Mail

From the bestselling and award-winning author of Paris 1919 comes a masterpiece of narrative nonfiction, a fascinating portrait of Europe from 1900 up to the outbreak of World War I.
 
The century since the end of the Napoleonic wars had been the most peaceful era Europe had known since the fall of the Roman Empire. In the first years of the twentieth century, Europe believed it was marching to a golden, happy, and prosperous future. But instead, complex personalities and rivalries, colonialism and ethnic nationalisms, and shifting alliances helped to bring about the failure of the long peace and the outbreak of a war that transformed Europe and the world.
 
The War That Ended Peace brings vividly to life the military leaders, politicians, diplomats, bankers, and the extended, interrelated family of crowned heads across Europe who failed to stop the descent into war: in Germany, the mercurial Kaiser Wilhelm II and the chief of the German general staff, Von Moltke the Younger; in Austria-Hungary, Emperor Franz Joseph, a man who tried, through sheer hard work, to stave off the coming chaos in his empire; in Russia, Tsar Nicholas II and his wife; in Britain, King Edward VII, Prime Minister Herbert Asquith, and British admiral Jacky Fisher, the fierce advocate of naval reform who entered into the arms race with Germany that pushed the continent toward confrontation on land and sea.
 
There are the would-be peacemakers as well, among them prophets of the horrors of future wars whose warnings went unheeded: Alfred Nobel, who donated his fortune to the cause of international understanding, and Bertha von Suttner, a writer and activist who was the first woman awarded Nobel’s new Peace Prize. Here too we meet the urbane and cosmopolitan Count Harry Kessler, who noticed many of the early signs that something was stirring in Europe; the young Winston Churchill, then First Lord of the Admiralty and a rising figure in British politics; Madame Caillaux, who shot a man who might have been a force for peace; and more. With indelible portraits, MacMillan shows how the fateful decisions of a few powerful people changed the course of history.
 
Taut, suspenseful, and impossible to put down, The War That Ended Peace is also a wise cautionary reminder of how wars happen in spite of the near-universal desire to keep the peace. Destined to become a classic in the tradition of Barbara Tuchman’s The Guns of August, The War That Ended Peace enriches our understanding of one of the defining periods and events of the twentieth century.
 
Praise for The War That Ended Peace
 
“Magnificent . . . The War That Ended Peace will certainly rank among the best books of the centennial crop.”The Economist
 
“Superb.”The New York Times Book Review
 
“Masterly . . . marvelous . . . Those looking to understand why World War I happened will have a hard time finding a better place to start.”The Christian Science Monitor
 
“The debate over the war’s origins has raged for years. Ms. MacMillan’s explanation goes straight to the heart of political fallibility. . . . Elegantly written, with wonderful character sketches of the key players, this is a book to be treasured.”—The Wall Street Journal

“A magisterial 600-page panorama.”—Christopher Clark, London Review of Books
In 1993, as a 23-year-old correspondent covering the wars in the Balkans, I was initially comforted by the roar of NATO planes flying overhead. President Clinton and other western leaders had sent the planes to monitor the Bosnian war, which had killed almost 200,000 civilians. But it soon became clear that NATO was unwilling to target those engaged in brutal "ethnic cleansing." American statesmen described Bosnia as "a problem from hell," and for three and a half years refused to invest the diplomatic and military capital needed to stop the murder of innocents. In Rwanda, around the same time, some 800,000 Tutsi and opposition Hutu were exterminated in the swiftest killing spree of the twentieth century. Again, the United States failed to intervene. This time U.S. policy-makers avoided labeling events "genocide" and spearheaded the withdrawal of UN peacekeepers stationed in Rwanda who might have stopped the massacres underway. Whatever America's commitment to Holocaust remembrance (embodied in the presence of the Holocaust Museum on the Mall in Washington, D.C.), the United States has never intervened to stop genocide. This book is an effort to understand why. While the history of America's response to genocide is not an uplifting one, "A Problem from Hell" tells the stories of countless Americans who took seriously the slogan of "never again" and tried to secure American intervention. Only by understanding the reasons for their small successes and colossal failures can we understand what we as a country, and we as citizens, could have done to stop the most savage crimes of the last century.
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