Home Economics

CLUTTER FREE SOLUTIONS FOR AN ORGANIZED HOME

 

Real Life Organizing offers clutter free storage solutions and advice that can help you create a Pinterest worthy home on a small budget: Learn how to organize your home, simplify life and have more time for the things you love. Organizational expert Cassandra ‘Cas’ Aarssen, the guru from YouTube’s ClutterBug channel, reveals her tips, tricks and secrets to a clean and clutter free home in just 15 minutes a day. Aarssen, spends her time organizing other people’s homes, teaching college workshops on organization, and creating weekly videos and blog posts. Cas offers diy Pinterest type tips to people like you who are interested in how to get rid of clutter and how to organize your home.


Organized person on the outside: The secret to her success? She’s a giant mess on the inside, but an organized person who can teach you how to get rid of clutter and organize your home once and for all.


Simplify your life: In her debut book, Real Life Organizing, Cas walks you through the steps you can take to create a beautiful, organized, clutter free, and almost self-cleaning home ─ a DIY Pinterest home. Simplify your life. You do not have to get rid of all of your things, you do not have to be a yoga loving minimalist, and you do not have to radically change your lifestyle or personality in order to simplify your life and have an organized home. The truth is that you do not need to actually be an organized person to live like an organized person.


Organize home: Through her years of experience as an industry expert, Cas has uncovered easy and inexpensive tips, tricks and solutions that allow her to maintain a clean, organized and functional home with minimal effort. After you’ve read Real Life Organizing, you too will be able to live a more organized life without having to give up your sanity.


In Real Life Organizing: Get a Clean and Clutter-Free Home in Just 15 Minutes, you will learn how to:

• Create a Household Management Binder
• Make a “Kids Cupboard” in your kitchen
• Create an IN/OUT system
• Organize paperwork based on your unique style
• Create a Kitchen Command Center
• Organize your holidays with a gift closet
• Build the best toy organizing system
• And, enjoy a DIY Pinterest home

“Master everyday tasks and take on a variety of projects and repairs around the house [with] this DIY encyclopedia” (The Buffalo News).

A modern and energetically designed reference with everything you need to know to roll up your sleeves and cook it, build it, sew it, clean it, or repair it yourself. In other words, everything you would have learned from your shop and home ec teachers, if you’d had them.

The Useful Book features 138 practical projects and how-tos, with step-by-step instructions and illustrations, relevant charts, sidebars, lists, and handy toolboxes. There’s a kitchen crash course, including the must-haves for a well-stocked pantry; how to boil an egg (and peel it frustration-free); how to grill, steam, sauté, and roast vegetables. There’s Sewing 101, plus how to fold a fitted sheet, tie a tie, mop a floor, make a bed, and set the table for a formal dinner.

Next up: a twenty-first-century shop class. The tools that everyone should have, and dozens of cool projects that teach fundamental techniques. Practice measuring, cutting, and nailing by building a birdhouse. Make a bookshelf or a riveted metal picture frame. Plus: do-it-yourself plumbing; car repair basics; and home maintenance, from priming and painting to refinishing wood floors.

“Married couple Sharon Bowers and David Bowers serve as mom-and-pop guides through the never-ending task of housekeeping in this handy book of how-tos . . . Readers learning to live on their own will want to have this book on hand.” —Publishers Weekly

“Anyone who studiously read the book cover to cover would become the paragon jack of all trades.”—Arkansas Democrat Gazette
 An interdisciplinary effort of scholars from history, women's studies, and family and consumer sciences, Remaking Home Economics covers the field's history of opening career opportunities for women and responding to domestic and social issues. Calls to “bring back home economics” miss the point that it never went away, say Sharon Y. Nickols and Gwen Kay—home economics has been remaking itself, in study and practice, for more than a century. These new essays, relevant for a variety of fields—history, women's studies, STEM, and family and consumer sciences itself—take both current and historical perspectives on defining issues including home economics philosophy, social responsibility, and public outreach; food and clothing; gender and race in career settings; and challenges to the field's identity and continuity.
Home economics history offers a rich case study for exploring common ground between the broader culture and this highly gendered profession. This volume describes the resourcefulness of past scholars and professionals who negotiated with cultural and institutional constraints to produce their work, as well as the innovations of contemporary practitioners who continue to change the profession, including its name and identity.

The widespread urge to reclaim domestic skills, along with a continual need for fresh ways to address obesity, elder abuse, household debt, and other national problems affirms the field's vitality and relevance. This volume will foster dialogue both inside and outside the academy about the changes that have remade (and are remaking) family and consumer sciences.

Contributors: Elizabeth L. Andress, Rima D. Apple, Jorge H. Atiles, Susan F. Clark, Billie J. Collier, Caroline E. Crocoll, Stephanie M. Foss, Gwen Kay, Emma M. Laing, Richard D. Lewis, Peggy S. Meszaros, Rachel Louise Moran, Virginia Moxley, Sharon Y. Nickols, Margarete Ordon, Linda Przybyszewski, Penny A. Ralston, Jane Schuchardt.
Read a little, learn a lot!

In the bestselling The Experts’ Guide to 100 Things Everyone Should Know How to Do, the world’s most knowledgeable experts provided unparalleled insights into mastering the little things in life that are often invariably the hardest to accomplish. Now, Experts’ Guide series creator Samantha Ettus once again brings together 100 renowned experts who share their proficiency and know-how to show you not only how to make your home more beautiful, but how to live more happily in it.

The first book to join three home-related genres—home improvement, self-help, and interior design—The Experts’ Guide to Life at Home is the ultimate must-have guide to mastering your domain. Divided into six sections (To Nest, To Protect, To Improve, To Beautify, To Relax, and To Enjoy), 100 of the world’s leading experts provide consummate insight into how to successfully accomplish everything from properly folding fitted sheets, as taught by the world’s leading computational origami expert; to hanging holiday lights, with guidance from the man who decorates the world-renowned Rockefeller Center Christmas tree; to carving a turkey, with instructions from Oprah’s personal chef.

The experts include:

• Al Roker, on how to Create a Family Barbecue

• Senator Dianne Feinstein, on how to Prevent Identity Theft

• Joy Browne, on how to Compromise

• Ina Garten, on how to Host a Dinner Party

• Harvey Karp, on how to Discipline Your Children

• Susie Coelho, on how to Make the Most of a Spare Room

• Jorge Cruise, on how to Incorporate Fitness into Your Daily Life

• Alexandra Stoddard, on how to Lead a Happy Life

The contributors to The Experts’ Guide to Life at Home range from instantly recognizable names like Rachael Ray and Leeza Gibbons to industry leaders like the CEO of AARP and the co-creators of the hit TV show The Amazing Race. All have been chosen for inclusion because they are at the very top of their profession, be it finance, cooking, relationships, medicine, security, or even building the perfect snowman.

From the bedroom to the kitchen, the kid’s room to the basement, the backyard to the front yard, The Experts’ Guide to Life at Home makes it easy to read a little and learn a lot about making the most of your home.




Also available:The Experts’ Guide to 100 Things Everyone Should Know How to Do
The simplest things are the hardest to master. From brewing your morning cup of coffee and reading the newspaper to apologizing or remembering names, it’s the small stuff that makes up day-to-day life. The Experts’ Guide to 100 Things Everyone Should Know How to Do provides unparalleled insights into how to do them better—more resourcefully, more effectively, and more efficiently—in 100 brief how-to essays by 100 of the world’s leading experts, including:

• Interpersonal skills like how to Tell a Story by Ira Glass and Listen by Larry King

• Etiquette essentials like how to Shake Hands by Letitia Baldrige, Set a Formal Table by Peggy Post, and Give and Receive a Compliment by Ms. Demeanor, Mary Mitchell

• Home pointers such as how to Paint a Room by Bob Vila, Remove a Stain by Linda Cobb, the Queen of Clean, and Do Laundry by Heloise

• Beauty basics that include how to Apply Lipstick by Bobbi Brown and Wash Your Hair by Frederic Fekkai

• Cooking tips such as how to Bake Chocolate Chip Cookies by Mrs. Fields, Barbecue by Bobby Flay, and Make Eggs by Jean-Georges Vongerichten

• Health hints like how to Breathe by Bikram Choudhury and Do Push-ups and Sit-ups by Kathy Smith

• Athletic advice including how to Hit a Tennis Ball by Jennifer Capriati, Swing a Golf Club by Jim McLean, and Swim by Summer Sanders

Some of these experts are household names, others are industry leaders—all are at the very top of their professions. From Holiday Inn’s housekeeper of the year (Make a Bed), the head groundskeeper of Fenway Park (Mow a Lawn), and the mayor of Buffalo (Shovel Snow) to the CEOs of Harry Winston (Buy a Diamond) and Thomas Pink (Tie a Windsor Knot), they are the authorities on their subjects. The Experts’ Guide to 100 Things Everyone Should Know How to Do brings together the best of the best, offering the world’s most valuable advice. With this book in hand, life will indeed be better.
An astute, accessible, and fun guide that explains once and for all why all those organizing books only help 25% of us

Let your natural inclinations guide you toward gaining control of your environment and learn to live life on your own terms. Drawing on the science of brain function and her experience as a professional organizer, Lanna Nakone offers tailored and specific advice that will actually work to help you tame your desk, unclutter your closet, manage your time, and save your sanity.

Take the Brain Style quiz to determine which of the four parts of the brain you rely on the most to process information, and which organizing style complements your brain function. If you rely on the

* Posterior left section of your brain, you're a Maintaining Style. You develop and follow routines well and adhere to traditional organizing methods.

* Frontal right section of your brain, you're an Innovating Style. Artistically creative, you have a unique stacking system that no one else understands.

* Posterior right section of your brain, you're a Harmonizing Style. Valuing interconnectedness with your family or coworkers, you need to be organized enough to keep your environment peaceful.

* Frontal left section of your brain, you're a Prioritizing Style. Adept at analyzing data, you prefer to delegate organizing.

Chapters specific to each type offer practical tips and strategies for implementing an organizing system, maintaining your system, and coexisting with different brain styles.

Insightful and understanding, Organizing for Your Brain Type turns the task of managing your life into an enjoyable experience.

With the blockade of Southern ports and the lack of trading between the North and South during the Civil War, the Confederacy found itself in great deprivation, lacking its customary supplies. Showing great resourcefulness, southerners developed new ways to feed and clothe themselves and these adaptations and recipes were pulled together in 1863 by Richmond publishers West & Johnson, to share throughout the region in Confederate Receipt Book. The recipes were assembled from newspapers, staff, and other sources and were “designed to supply useful and economical directions and suggestions of cookery, housewifery, and for the camp.” Examples of resourceful recipes in Confederate Receipt Book include apple pie without apples, artificial oysters, and coffee substitutes as well as medicinal remedies for headaches, croup, and sore throats and making household items like candles and soap. The nature and extent of the items highlight the degree of difficulty that the Confederates faced and their ability to acclimate to the supplies at hand. Other examples include recipes for making ink, wicks for lamps, fire balls for fuel, and bread from numerous types of flours. The Confederate Receipt Book has as much quaint and amusing charm to present-day readers as it had practical significance to the beleaguered South fighting for its independence.  This edition of Confederate Receipt Book was reproduced by permission from the volume in the collection of the American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, Massachusetts. Founded in 1812 by Isaiah Thomas, a Revolutionary War patriot and successful printer and publisher, the Society is a research library documenting the life of Americans from the colonial era through 1876. The Society collects, preserves, and makes available as complete a record as possible of the printed materials from the early American experience. The cookbook collection includes approximately 1,100 volumes.
Published in Hartford in 1796, this volume in the American Antiquarian Cookbook Collection is a facsimile edition of one of the most important documents in American culinary history. This is the first cookbook written by an American author specifically published for American kitchens.
Named by the Library of Congress as one of the 88 "Books That Shaped America," American Cookery was the first cookbook by an American author published in the United States. Until its publication, cookbooks printed and used by American colonists were British. As indicated in Amelia Simmons’s subtitle, the recipes in her book were “adapted to this country,” reflecting the fact that American cooks had learned to make do with what was available in North America. This cookbook reveals the rich variety of food colonial Americans used, their tastes, cooking and eating habits, and even their rich, down-to-earth language. Bringing together English cooking methods with truly American products, American Cookery contains the first known printed recipes substituting American maize for English oats; and the recipe for Johnny Cake is apparently the first printed version using cornmeal. The book also contains the first known recipe for turkey. Possibly the most far-reaching innovation was Simmons’s use of pearlash—a staple in colonial households as a leavening agent in dough, which eventually led to the development of modern baking powders.  

“Thus, twenty years after the political upheaval of the American Revolution of 1776, a second revolution—a culinary revolution—occurred with the publication of a cookbook by an American for Americans.” (Jan Longone, curator of American Culinary History, University of Michigan)

This facsimile edition of Amelia Simmons's American Cookery was reproduced by permission from the volume in the collection of the American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, Massachusetts. Founded in 1812 by Isaiah Thomas, a Revolutionary War patriot and successful printer and publisher, the Society is a research library documenting the life of Americans from the colonial era through 1876. The Society collects, preserves, and makes available as complete a record as possible of the printed materials from the early American experience. The cookbook collection includes approximately 1,100 volumes.
One of the Guardian's TOP TEN BOOKS to gift.

'It's practical AND beautiful . . . an ideal gift' Graham Norton, BBC Radio 2

Britain's best-loved cook and national treasure Mary Berry lets readers in on her very own household secrets . . . A comprehensive, beautifully illustrated guide that shares her greatest tips on how to care for your home.

'This book is a collection of skills I've learned for running a home. Gleaned from years of practical experience, along with all the hints that friends and family have imparted to me, I hope it will be a helping hand' - Mary Berry

Inside you'll find . . .

A KITCHEN KNOW-HOW for the heart of your home - Freezer tips - Organize your food - CLEANING & CONFIGURING YOUR HOME - Create cleaning products from store cupboard items - LAUNDRY & WARDROBE WISDOM - Banish moths from your home for good - Remove stains from every kind of fabric - get green fingered with GARDENING & FLOWERS - Bring greenery into your home even without a garden - Create beautiful flower arrangements - And finally master the art of HOSTING & ADDING THE EXTRA TOUCHES for sparkling parties at home.

Easy to use, practical and gorgeously illustrated, Mary's Household Tips & Tricks covers everything from Mary's golden rules for baking to her favourite flowers for each season, from how to polish silver to whether tea should be poured before or after milk. With secrets for accomplishing the most challenging home-keeping tasks with ease, Mary's wonderfully simple book will help turn any house into a home.

'The Queen of British baking has whipped up a recipe for home happiness' The Independent

'A domestic goddess' The Daily Telegraph

When Jennifer Reese lost her job, she was overcome by an impulse common among the recently unemployed: to economize by doing for herself what she had previously paid for. She had never before considered making her own peanut butter and pita bread, let alone curing her own prosciutto or raising turkeys. And though it sounded logical that “doing it yourself” would cost less, she had her doubts. So Reese began a series of kitchen-related experiments, taking into account the competing demands of everyday contemporary American family life as she answers some timely questions: When is homemade better? Cheaper? Are backyard eggs a more ethical choice than store-bought? Will grinding and stuffing your own sausage ruin your week? Is it possible to make an edible maraschino cherry? Some of Reese’s discoveries will surprise you: Although you should make your hot dog buns, guacamole, and yogurt, you should probably buy your hamburger buns, potato chips, and rice pudding. Tired? Buy your mayonnaise. Inspired? Make it.

With its fresh voice and delightful humor, Make the Bread, Buy the Butter gives 120 recipes with eminently practical yet deliciously fun “Make or buy” recommendations. Reese is relentlessly entertaining as she relates her food and animal husbandry adventures, which amuse and perplex as well as nourish and sustain her family. Her tales include living with a backyard full of cheerful chickens, muttering ducks, and adorable baby goats; countertops laden with lacto-fermenting pickles; and closets full of mellowing cheeses. Here’s the full picture of what is involved in a truly homemade life—with the good news that you shouldn’t try to make everything yourself—and how to get the most out of your time in the kitchen.
Bring your home out of the mess it’s in and learn how to keep it under control.

“The dirty little secret about most organizing advice is that it’s written by organized people,” says blogger, speaker, and decluttering expert Dana K. White. “But that’s not how my brain works. I’m lost on page three.” Dana blogs at A Slob Comes Clean, chronicling her successes and failures with her self-described “deslobification process.” In the beginning she used the name “Nony” (short for aNONYmous), because she was sharing her deep, dark, slob secret. Now she has truly come clean—with not only her real name but the strategies she has developed, tested, and proved in her own home. She has learned what it takes to bring a home out of Disaster Status, which habits make the biggest and most lasting impact, and how to keep clutter under control.

In How to Manage Your Home Without Losing Your Mind, Dana explains that cleaning your house is not a onetime project but a series of ongoing premade decisions. Her reality-based cleaning and organizing techniques debunk the biggest housekeeping fantasies and help readers learn what really works. Chapter titles include

My First Step: Giving Up on the FantasyThe Worst Thing About the Best WayJust Tell Me What to DoConquering LaundryGet Dinner on the TablePutting an End to the Never-Ending Weekly Cleaning TasksDon’t Get OrganizedHow to Declutter Without Making a Bigger MessFighting the Perceived Value BattleBut Will It Last?

With a huge helping of empathy and humor, Dana provides a step-by-step process with strategies for getting rid of enormous amounts of stuff in as little time (and with as little emotional drama) as possible.

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