Arizona

This carefully crafted ebook: "To The Last Man: A Story of the Pleasant Valley War (Western Classic)” is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. Table of Contents: To The Last Man The Mysterious Rider Desert Gold To the Last Man: A Story of the Pleasant Valley War is a western novel. It is a story of a family feud healed by young love. The story is based on a factual event involving the notorious Hashknife gang of Northern Arizona. The story follows an ancient feud between two frontier families that is inflamed when one of the families takes up cattle rustling. "Seventeen years ago miners working a claim of Belllounds's in the mountains above Middle Park had found a child asleep in the columbines along the trail. Near that point Indians, probably Arapahoes coming across the mountains to attack the Utes, had captured or killed the occupants of a prairie-schooner. There was no other clue. The miners took the child to their camp, fed and cared for it, and, after the manner of their kind, named it Columbine. Then they brought it to Belllounds.” - Zane Grey, "The Mysterious Rider” "A face haunted Cameron—a woman's face. It was there in the white heart of the dying campfire; it hung in the shadows that hovered over the flickering light; it drifted in the darkness beyond.” - Zane Grey, "Desert Gold” Zane Grey (1872-1939) was an American author best known for his popular adventure novels and stories that were a basis for the Western genre in literature and the arts. With his veracity and emotional intensity, he connected with millions of readers worldwide, during peacetime and war, and inspired many Western writers who followed him. Grey was a major force in shaping the myths of the Old West; his books and stories were adapted into other media, such as film and TV productions. He was the author of more than 90 books, some published posthumously and/or based on serials originally published in magazines.
Make Your Escape with Moon Travel Guides!

Wander world-class museums, relax in Scottsdale's resorts, and hike through red rocks in the Valley of the Sun with Moon Phoenix, Scottsdale & Sedona. Inside you'll find:

Strategic itineraries, including a luxurious desert getaway, a family road trip, and a 10-day "Best of the Valley of the Sun"Helpful photos and detailed maps throughoutMust-see attractions and off-beat ideas for making the most of your trip: Explore the local art scene, from Native American exhibits to contemporary galleries. Taste the best Sonoran-style cuisine this side of the Mexican border. Luxuriate in five-star resorts, world-class spas, and gourmet restaurants. Go stargazing in Sedona, or clubbing in Scottsdale. Browse new-agey shops or high-end boutiques, hike water-carved canyons and climb mountains, or go golfing at one of nearly 200 courses. Discover the rich culture of the Native American people who first settled the Valley, and venture to the leafy respite of Oak Creek Canyon to witness the red-rock monolithsHonest advice from Phoenix local Lilia Menconi on when to go and where to stay, with special focus on the best resorts in the area In-depth coverage of all three cities, including the Apache Trail and Superstition MountainsRecommendations for visitors with disabilities and for traveling with kidsThorough background on the culture, environment, wildlife, and historyWith Moon's local insight, diverse activities, and expert tips on experiencing the best of Phoenix, Scottsdale, and Sedona, you can plan your trip your way!

Expanding your trip? Try Moon Arizona. Hitting the road? Try Moon Southwest Road Trip.

From acclaimed novelist Kate Christensen, Blue Plate Special is a mouthwatering literary memoir about an unusual upbringing and the long, winding path to happiness.

“To taste fully is to live fully.” For Kate Christensen, food and eating have always been powerful connectors to self and world—“a subterranean conduit to sensuality, memory, desire.” Her appetites run deep; in her own words, she spent much of her life as “a hungry, lonely, wild animal looking for happiness and stability.” Now, having found them at last, in this passionate feast of a memoir she reflects upon her journey of innocence lost and wisdom gained, mistakes made and lessons learned, and hearts broken and mended.
   In the tradition of M. F. K. Fisher, Laurie Colwin, and Ruth Reichl, Blue Plate Special is a narrative in which food—eating it, cooking it, reflecting on it—becomes the vehicle for unpacking a life. Christensen explores her history of hunger—not just for food but for love and confidence and a sense of belonging—with a profound honesty, starting with her unorthodox childhood in 1960s Berkeley as the daughter of a mercurial legal activist who ruled the house with his fists. After a whirlwind adolescent awakening, Christensen strikes out to chart her own destiny within the literary world and the world of men, both equally alluring and dangerous. Food of all kinds, from Ho Hos to haute cuisine, remains an evocative constant throughout, not just as sustenance but as a realm of experience unto itself, always reflective of what is going on in her life. She unearths memories—sometimes joyful, sometimes painful—of the love between mother and daughter, sister and sister, and husband and wife, and of the times when the bonds of love were broken. Food sustains her as she endures the pain of these ruptures and fuels her determination not to settle for anything less than the love and contentment for which she’s always yearned.
   The physical and emotional sensuality that defines Christensen’s fiction resonates throughout the pages of Blue Plate Special. A vibrant celebration of life in all its truth and complexity, this book is about embracing the world through the transformative power of food: it’s about listening to your appetites, about having faith, and about learning what is worth holding on to and what is not.
Hailed as a model state history thanks to Thomas E. Sheridan's thoughtful analysis and lively interpretation of the people and events shaping the Grand Canyon State, Arizona has become a standard in the field. Now, just in time for Arizona's centennial, Sheridan has revised and expanded this already top-tier state history to incorporate events and changes that have taken place in recent years. Addressing contemporary issues like land use, water rights, dramatic population increases, suburban sprawl, and the US-Mexico border, the new material makes the book more essential than ever. It successfully places the forty-eighth state's history within the context of national and global events. No other book on Arizona history is as integrative or comprehensive.

From stone spear points more than 10,000 years old to the boom and bust of the housing market in the first decade of this century, Arizona: A History explores the ways in which Native Americans, Hispanics, African Americans, Asians, and Anglos have inhabited and exploited Arizona. Sheridan, a life-long resident of the state, puts forth new ideas about what a history should be, embracing a holistic view of the region and shattering the artificial line between prehistory and history. Other works on Arizona's history focus on government, business, or natural resources, but this is the only book to meld the ethnic and cultural complexities of the state's history into the main flow of the story.

A must read for anyone interested in Arizona's past or present, this extensive revision of the classic work will appeal to students, scholars, and general readers alike.

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