Law school

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DECODE THE QUESTIONS. DEFEAT THE LSAT.

All the practice in the world won’t help you improve if you can’t understand what you’re doing wrong.
 
That’s why The Princeton Review’s new LSAT Decoded series is the perfect companion for LSAC’s Official LSAT PrepTest® books. LSAC provides the real exams but no accompanying answer explanations; we skip the question stems but provide valuable, step-by-step solutions for every one of the 1000+ questions on those tests.
 
Armed with explanations, you can start to understand why you got an LSAT question wrong—and feel confident about when you’re getting them right.
 
By working through each question methodically, you’ll:
• learn how the test-writers think, and how to outthink them;
• start to pinpoint the argument types that consistently trip you up, and learn the best ways to handle them;
• train yourself to swiftly and effectively build diagrams for tricky Logic Games.

With the test-conquering tips and strategies found in LSAT Decoded’s explanations, you'll finally be able to decipher the secret language of this notoriously difficult exam.

This book is intended to be used as a companion to the LSAC-issued 10 Actual, Official LSAT PrepTests Volume V™: PrepTests 62–71, which contains real tests administered from December 2010 to December 2013. The full text of the PrepTests is not included in this book.
This eBook edition is optimized for on-screen viewing with cross-linked questions, answers, and explanations.

DECODE THE QUESTIONS. DEFEAT THE LSAT.

All the practice in the world won’t help you improve if you can’t understand what you’re doing wrong.
 
That’s why The Princeton Review’s new LSAT Decoded series is the perfect companion for LSAC’s Official LSAT PrepTest® books. LSAC provides the real exams but no accompanying answer explanations; we skip the question stems but provide valuable, step-by-step solutions for every one of the 1000+ questions on those tests.
 
Armed with explanations, you can start to understand why you got an LSAT question wrong—and feel confident about when you’re getting them right.
 
By working through each question methodically, you’ll:
• learn how the test-writers think, and how to outthink them;
• start to pinpoint the argument types that consistently trip you up, and learn the best ways to handle them;
• train yourself to swiftly and effectively build diagrams for tricky Logic Games.

With the test-conquering tips and strategies found in LSAT Decoded’s explanations, you'll finally be able to decipher the secret language of this notoriously difficult exam.

This book is intended to be used as a companion to the LSAC-issued 10 New Actual, Official LSAT PrepTests with Comparative Reading™ (PrepTests 52–61), which contains real tests administered from September 2007 to October 2010. The full text of the PrepTests is not included in this book.
I WISH I KNEW THEN WHAT I KNOW NOW!

Don't get to the end of your law school career muttering these words to yourself! Take the first step toward building a productive, successful, and perhaps even pleasant law school experience—read this book!

Written by students, for students, Law School Confidential has been the "must-have" guide for anyone thinking about, applying to, or attending law school for more than a decade. And now, in this newly revised third edition, it's more valuable than ever.
This isn't the advice of graying professors or battle-scarred practitioners long removed from law school. Robert H. Miller has assembled a blue-ribbon panel of recent graduates from across the country to offer realistic and informative firsthand advice about what law school is really like.
This updated edition contains the very latest information and strategies for thriving and surviving in law school—from navigating the admissions process and securing financial aid, choosing classes, studying and exam strategies, and securing a seat on the law review to getting a judicial clerkship and a job, passing the bar exam, and much, much more. Newly added material also reveals a sea change that is just starting to occur in legal education, turning it away from the theory-based platform of the previous several decades to a pragmatic platform being demanded by the rigors of today's practices.
Law School Confidential is a complete guide to the law school experience that no prospective or current law student can afford to be without.
On the surface, law schools today are thriving. Enrollments are on the rise, and their resources are often the envy of every other university department. Law professors are among the highest paid and play key roles as public intellectuals, advisers, and government officials. Yet behind the flourishing facade, law schools are failing abjectly. Recent front-page stories have detailed widespread dubious practices, including false reporting of LSAT and GPA scores, misleading placement reports, and the fundamental failure to prepare graduates to enter the profession.

Addressing all these problems and more in a ringing critique is renowned legal scholar Brian Z. Tamanaha. Piece by piece, Tamanaha lays out the how and why of the crisis and the likely consequences if the current trend continues. The out-of-pocket cost of obtaining a law degree at many schools now approaches $200,000. The average law school graduate’s debt is around $100,000—the highest it has ever been—while the legal job market is the worst in decades, with the scarce jobs offering starting salaries well below what is needed to handle such a debt load. At the heart of the problem, Tamanaha argues, are the economic demands and competitive pressures on law schools—driven by competition over U.S. News and World Report ranking. When paired with a lack of regulatory oversight, the work environment of professors, the limited information available to prospective students, and loan-based tuition financing, the result is a system that is fundamentally unsustainable.

Growing concern with the crisis in legal education has led to high-profile coverage in the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times, and many observers expect it soon will be the focus of congressional scrutiny. Bringing to the table his years of experience from within the legal academy, Tamanaha has provided the perfect resource for assessing what’s wrong with law schools and figuring out how to fix them.

From first-day nerves to first-year grades, from bizarre job interviews to bar exam insanity, Ivy Briefs pulls back the curtain on the marbled halls of law school, revealing the absurdity often bubbling beneath the surface.

Meet Martha Kimes: a naïve small-town girl with strong neurotic tendencies who has (due to an inexplicable stroke of luck) been admitted to Columbia Law School. She's a Midwesterner in the middle of Manhattan, a student on the verge of a nervous breakdown. In her candid memoir -- the best of its kind since One L and the only one written by a woman -- Kimes makes her way through law school, doing battle with a memorable cast of characters:

The Sadistic Professor: Every law student's nemesis, the Sadistic Professor takes pity on no one. The Socratic Method is his favorite torture device, and he's got staying power that rivals that of the Energizer Bunny.

The Gunner: So enamored with the sound of his own voice, he finds it physically impossible to keep his hand from gunning up into the air every time a professor asks a question. Ten minutes into the start of the school year, everyone is already sick of the Gunner.

The Do-gooder: Lurking behind a kind exterior is a pit bull ready to pounce on those who don't plan to devote their legal careers to public service. But would she be so quick to categorize all those who dare go into corporate law as loathsome, soulless warriors for the devil if she, too, had student loans to repay?

The Boarding School Bastard: He wears a firmly pressed pin-striped oxford shirt and has a condescending attitude bigger than most European countries. By definition he is better than you because he went to Exeter. And he'll never let you forget it.

With sharp wit, dead-on aim, and a healthy dose of self-deprecation, Kimes proves that it is possible to survive law school with both your sense of humor and your sanity intact.
American law schools are in deep crisis. Enrollment is down, student loan debt is up, and the profession's supply of high-paying jobs is shrinking. Meanwhile, thousands of graduates remain underemployed while the legal needs of low-income communities go substantially unmet. Many blame overregulation and seek a "free" market to solve the problem, but this has already been tested. Seizing on a deregulatory policy shift at the American Bar Association, private equity financiers established the first for-profit law schools in the early 2000s with the stated mission to increase access to justice by "serving the underserved". Pursuing this mission at a feverish rate of growth, they offered the promise of professional upward mobility through high-tech, simplified teaching and learning.

In Law Mart, a vivid ethnography of one such environment, Riaz Tejani argues that the rise of for-profit law schools shows the limits of a market-based solution to American access to justice. Building on theories in law, political economy, and moral anthropology, Tejani reveals how for-profit law schools marketed themselves directly to ethnoracial and socioeconomic "minority" communities, relaxed admission standards, increased diversity, shook up established curricula, and saw student success rates plummet. They contributed to a dramatic rise in U.S. law student debt burdens while charging premium tuition financed up-front through federal loans over time. If economic theories have so influenced legal scholarship, what happens when they come to shape law school transactions, governance, and oversight? For students promised professional citizenship by these institutions, is there a need for protections that better uphold institutional quality and sustainability? Offering an unprecedented glimpse of this landscape, Law Mart is a colorful foray into these essential questions.

Students and the public routinely consult various published college rankings to assess the quality of colleges and universities and easily compare different schools. However, many institutions have responded to the rankings in ways that benefit neither the schools nor their students. In Engines of Anxiety, sociologists Wendy Espeland and Michael Sauder delve deep into the mechanisms of law school rankings, which have become a top priority within legal education. Based on a wealth of observational data and over 200 in-depth interviews with law students, university deans, and other administrators, they show how the scramble for high rankings has affected the missions and practices of many law schools.

Engines of Anxiety tracks how rankings, such as those published annually by the U.S. News & World Report, permeate every aspect of legal education, beginning with the admissions process. The authors find that prospective law students not only rely heavily on such rankings to evaluate school quality, but also internalize rankings as expressions of their own abilities and flaws. For example, they often view rejections from “first-tier” schools as a sign of personal failure. The rankings also affect the decisions of admissions officers, who try to balance admitting diverse classes with preserving the school’s ranking, which is dependent on factors such as the median LSAT score of the entering class. Espeland and Sauder find that law schools face pressure to admit applicants with high test scores over lower-scoring candidates who possess other favorable credentials.

Engines of Anxiety also reveals how rankings have influenced law schools’ career service departments. Because graduates’ job placements play a major role in the rankings, many institutions have shifted their career-services resources toward tracking placements, and away from counseling and network-building. In turn, law firms regularly use school rankings to recruit and screen job candidates, perpetuating a cycle in which highly ranked schools enjoy increasing prestige. As a result, the rankings create and reinforce a rigid hierarchy that penalizes lower-tier schools that do not conform to the restrictive standards used in the rankings. The authors show that as law schools compete to improve their rankings, their programs become more homogenized and less accessible to non-traditional students.

The ranking system is considered a valuable resource for learning about more than 200 law schools. Yet, Engines of Anxiety shows that the drive to increase a school’s rankings has negative consequences for students, educators, and administrators and has implications for all educational programs that are quantified in similar ways.

Approximately 110,000 students take the Law School Admission Test, more commonly referred to as the LSAT, every year. The LSAT, used as a measure of a studentâe(tm)s acquired reading and verbal reasoning skills, is required by most American Bar Association approved law schools, as well as most others. On a scoring scale of 120 to 180, the average score is 150, with half of students scoring between 145 and 160. It is important to perform well on your LSATs because this test carries a lot of weight in the decision-making process. But how can you improve your score and be accepted into the law school of your choice? Reading 101 Ways to Score Higher on Your LSAT and employing the techniques found within is one way to do so.

In this new book, you will learn about and understand the scoring system, as well as the format and the content. You will learn how to read questions correctly, how to control your anxiety, and how to approach each section. In addition, you will be presented with a list of resources to help you prepare and dozens of proven strategies, mindsets, and problem solving methods.

101 Ways to Score Higher on Your LSAT is filled with practice questions and information found in each of the five sections, including reading comprehension, analytical reasoning, logical reasoning âe" of which there are two sections âe" and a variable section often used to pretest new questions. A writing sample is also included, but is not scored. You will find reviews of the skills believed to be essential for success in law school, such as reading and comprehending complex texts, organizing and managing information, drawing inferences, thinking critically, analyzing and evaluating othersâe(tm) arguments, and applying logic to abstract concepts.

Instead of panicking and worrying about the LSAT, pick up this book and be confident in your test-taking abilities. Whether you are taking the test for the first time or are reviewing for your second attempt, you will learn valuable information and practical tips to improve your score.



Atlantic Publishing is a small, independent publishing company based in Ocala, Florida. Founded over twenty years ago in the company presidentâe(tm)s garage, Atlantic Publishing has grown to become a renowned resource for non-fiction books. Today, over 450 titles are in print covering subjects such as small business, healthy living, management, finance, careers, and real estate. Atlantic Publishing prides itself on producing award winning, high-quality manuals that give readers up-to-date, pertinent information, real-world examples, and case studies with expert advice. Every book has resources, contact information, and web sites of the products or companies discussed.

Professors Fischl and Paul explain law school exams in ways no one
has before, all with an eye toward improving the reader’s performance.
The book begins by describing the difference between educational
cultures that praise students for “right answers,” and the law school
culture that rewards nuanced analysis of ambiguous situations in which
more than one approach may be correct. Enormous care is devoted to
explaining precisely how and why legal analysis frequently produces such
perplexing situations.


But the authors don’t stop with mere description. Instead, Getting to Maybe
teaches how to excel on law school exams by showing the reader how
legal analysis can be brought to bear on examination problems. The book
contains hints on studying and preparation that go well beyond
conventional advice. The authors also illustrate how to argue both sides
of a legal issue without appearing wishy-washy or indecisive. Above
all, the book explains why exam questions may generate feelings of
uncertainty or doubt about correct legal outcomes and how the student
can turn these feelings to his or her advantage.


In sum, although the authors believe that no exam guide can
substitute for a firm grasp of substantive material, readers who devote
the necessary time to learning the law will find this book an invaluable
guide to translating learning into better exam performance.


“This book should revolutionize the ordeal of studying for
law school exams… Its clear, insightful, fun to read, and right on the
money.” — Duncan Kennedy, Carter Professor of General Jurisprudence, Harvard Law School 
“Finally
a study aid that takes legal theory seriously… Students who master
these lessons will surely write better exams. More importantly, they
will also learn to be better lawyers.” — Steven L. Winter, Brooklyn Law School
“If
you can't spot a 'fork in the law' or a 'fork in the facts' in an exam
hypothetical, get this book. If you don’t know how to play 'Czar of the
Universe' on law school exams (or why), get this book. And if you do
want to learn how to think like a lawyer—a good one—get this book. It's,
quite simply, stone cold brilliant.” — Pierre Schlag, University of Colorado School of Law (Law Preview Book Review on The Princeton Review website)

Attend a Getting to Maybe seminar! Click here for more information.

Like an atlas, the LL.M. Roadmap: An International Student's Guide to U.S. Law School Programs provides a series of "roadmaps" to guide prospective LL.M. students through every step of their journey. From assessing your reasons to acquire an LL.M., to choosing an American law school, meeting financial and immigration challenges, and succeeding in law school and a career in law, the LL.M. Roadmap provides straightforward guidance, along with plenty of checklists and reference sources. In ten parts and 33 chapters, this valuable text offers a careful examination of every consideration and contingency for making important life decisions.
An indispensable guide for prospective LL.M. candidates, the LL.M. Roadmap features:
  • information and analysis to help readers answer their most pressing questions, such as
    • Should I worry about an LL.M. program's ranking and reputation?
    • How do I get admitted to a U.S. LL.M. Program?
    • What questions should I ask before accepting a U.S. law school's offer of admission?
    • What kind of financial assistance is available? Can I work part-time during my LL.M. program?
    • What will it take to succeed in a U.S. LL.M. program?
  • practical guidance for navigating through the entire LL.M. experience
    • degree and English-language proficiency requirements
    • how U.S. law professors teach
    • legal writing, research, and communication techniques
    • determining whether extracurricular activities will help
    • common immigration and student visa challenges and requirements
  • employment and career advice
  • numerous checklists and lists of resources
'A nation without a national government is an awful spectacle.' In the winter of 1787-8 a series of eighty-five essays appeared in the New York press; the purpose of the essays was to persuade the citizens of New York State to ratify the Constitution of the United States. The three authors - Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay - were respectively the first Secretary of the Treasury, the fourth President, and the first Chief Justice of the Supreme Court in American history. Each had played a crucial role in the events of the American Revolution; together they were convinced of the need to weld thirteen disparate and newly-independent states into a union. Their essays make the case for a new and united nation, governed under a written Constitution that endures to this day. The Federalist Papers are an indispensable guide to the intentions of the founding fathers who created the United States, and a canonical text in the development of western political thought. This new edition pays full attention to the classical learning of their authors and the historical examples they deploy. ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.
In this engaging, erudite new book, Robert J. Kaczorowski, Director of the Condon Institute of Legal History, immerses readers in the story of Fordham Law School from the day it opened its doors in 1905 in the midst of massive changes in the United States, in the legal profession, and in legal education. Kaczorowski explores why so many immigrants and their children needed the founding of Catholic law schools in order to enter the legal profession in the first half of the twentieth century. He documents how, in the 1920s and 30s, when the legal profession's elites were actively trying to raise barriers that would exclude immigrants, Dean Wilkinson and the law faculty at Fordham were implementing higher standards while simultaneously striving to make Fordham the best avenue into the legal profession for New York City's immigrants. Tracing Fordham Law School's history in the context of developments in legal education over the course of the twentieth century, this book pinpoints those factors that produce greatness in a law school and those that contribute to its decline. Fordham University School of Law: A History shows and explains why, prior to World War II, Fordham was one of the leading law schools in America and, along with Columbia, one of the top two law schools in New York City. As one of those leading schools, Fordham was in the vanguard of legal education reform, and its faculty made important contributions to legal scholarship. Fordham University School of Law: A History also reveals that, after World War II, the Law School suffered a decline, primarily because of inadequate funding resulting from the university's fiscal policies. These policies brought the university's administration into direct conflict with the American Bar Association (ABA) and the Association of American Law Schools (AALS), which consistently observed that the Law School was being starved for funds compared to its peer schools, with the result that peer law schools were improving their quality while Fordham was in decline. The conflict, which did not approach resolution at Fordham until the last quarter of the century, was replicated throughout legal education, especially in Catholic universities yet, this is the first scholarly work to document and explain it. Kaczorowski's wonderfully contextualized, meticulously documented history of Fordham Law School brings readers right up to the present day and traces how the Law School, with the unprecedented financial support and active involvement of its alumni, is resuming its prior position as one of the nation's leading law schools.
In 1946 a young woman named Ada Lois Sipuel Fisher (1924–1995) was denied admission to the University of Oklahoma College of Law because she was African American. The OU law school was an all-white institution in a town where African Americans could work and shop as long as they got out before sundown. But if segregation was entrenched in Norman, so was the determination of black Oklahomans who had survived slavery to stake a claim in the territory. This was the tradition that Ada Lois Sipuel sprang from, a tradition and determination that would sustain her through the slow, tortuous path of litigation to gaining admission to law school. A Step toward Brown v. Board of Education—the first book to tell Fisher’s full story—is at once an inspiring biography and a remarkable chapter in the history of race and civil rights in America.

Cheryl Elizabeth Brown Wattley gives us a richly textured picture of the black-and-white world from which Ada Lois Sipuel and her family emerged. Against this Oklahoma background Wattley shows Sipuel (who married Warren Fisher a year before she filed her suit) struggling against a segregated educational system. Her legal battle is situated within the history of civil rights litigation and race-related jurisprudence in the state of Oklahoma and in the nation. Hers was a test case organized by the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) to go all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court and, as precedent, strike another blow against “separate but equal” public education.

Fisher served as both a litigant, with Thurgood Marshall for counsel, and, later, a litigator; both a plaintiff and an advocate for the NAACP; and both a student and, ultimately, a teacher of the very history she had helped to write. In telling Fisher’s story, Wattley also reveals a time and a place undergoing a profound transformation spurred by one courageous woman taking a bold step forward.
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