Similar

"Between 1650 and 1775 many thousands of Scots were banished to the American colonies for political, religious, or criminal offenses. In the aftermath of the English Civil War, for example, Oliver Cromwell transported thousands of Scots soldiers to Virginia, New England, and the West Indies. The Covenanter Risings of the later 17th century led to around 1,700 Scots being expelled as enemies of the state, and the Jacobite Rebellions of 1715 and 1745 resulted in an additional 1,600 men, women, and children being banished to the colonies. Moreover, from the 1650s to 1830, when it became illegal, banishment and transportation to the colonies was a traditional punishment for certain serious?but over time petty?crimes, thereby contributing even further to the Scottish population of colonial America. In the more than twenty-five years since Dr. David Dobson first endeavored to account for the individual Scots who took part in this forced emigration (1984)--the ancestors of thousands of Americans living today--he has established himself as the undisputed authority on Scottish emigration to the New World. In the absence of official Scottish passenger lists for the period, he initially derived his information from the records of the Privy Council of Scotland, the High Court of Justiciary, Treasury and State Pagers, and prison records, the sources of the majority of extant information available on the Scots who were banished to the colonies prior to 1775. His initial success, however, did not stop him over the intervening years from hunting in ever more obscure sources in North America and the UK--sources such as the Aberdeen Journal, Caledonian Mercury, the Dumfries and Galloway Archives, Justiciary Records of Argyll, Calendar of Home Office Papers, and more. Dr. Dobson?s tireless efforts have produced this new second edition of the Directory of Scots Banished to the American Plantations, 1650-1775, containing fully 30% more convict passengers than in the original. For each person cited in this directory, some or all of the following information is provided: name, occupation, place of residence in Scotland, place of capture and captivity, parents? names, date and cause of banishment, name of the ship carrying him or her to the colonies, and date and place of arrival in the colonies. The exact number of Scots banished to the Americas may never be known because records are not comprehensive; moreover, some Scottish felons sentenced in England were shipped from English ports. The contemporary English judicial system was harsher than in Scotland, which explains why the Hanoverian government had the Jacobite prisoners taken south to England for trial. The first edition of this work has been enlarged by the addition of fresh material, particularly from American sources but also from more obscure sources in Scotland. Dr. Dobson has made some modifications as well; for example, some men who were thought to have been Covenanters are now classed as rebels and English transportees have been omitted, while the references used have been enhanced to facilitate further research. In total, somewhere between 4,000 and 5,000 Scots were banished to the Americas during the Colonial period (whereas England transported around 50,000 and Ireland in excess of 10,000), all of whom contributed to the settlement and development of Colonial America."--Genealogical.com.
This is a definitive account of the land and the people of Old Monocacy in early Frederick County, Maryland. The outgrowth of a project begun by Grace L. Tracey and completed by John P. Dern, it presents a detailed account of landholdings in that part of western Maryland that eventually became Frederick County. At the same time it provides a history of the inhabitants of the area, from the early traders and explorers to the farsighted investors and speculators, from the original Quaker settlers to the Germans of central Frederick County.
In essence, the book has a dual focus. First it attempts to locate and describe the land of the early settlers. This is done by means of a superb series of plat maps, drawn to scale from original surveys and based both on certificates of survey and patents. These show, in precise configurations, the exact locations of the various grants and lots, the names of owners and occupiers, the dates of surveys and patents, and the names of contiguous land owners. Second, it identifies the early settlers and inhabitants of the area, carefully following them through deeds, wills, and inventories, judgment records, and rent rolls.
Finally, in meticulously compiled appendices it provides a chronological list of surveys between 1721 and 1743; an alphabetical list of surveys, giving dates, page reference--text and maps--and patent references; a list of taxables for 1733-34; and a list of the early German settlers of Frederick County, showing their religion, their location, dates of arrival, and their earliest records in the county.
Winner of the 1988 Donald Lines Jacobus Award!
This book began as Jean Stephenson's effort to validate the family tradition that her great-great-grandparents emigrated from Belfast to South Carolina under the leadership of Covenanter Presbyterian minister William Martin in 1772. The author was not only able to authenticate the crux of the story, but, in the process, to place nearly 500 Scotch-Irish families in South Carolina on the eve of the Revolutionary War. The impetus for the colonization was the combination of exorbitant land rents in Northern Ireland, sometimes provoking violent resistance, and the offer of free land and inexpensive tools and provisions tendered by the colonial government of South Carolina. For instance, each Scottish Covenanter was entitled to 100 acres for himself and 50 acres for his spouse, and an additional 50 acres for each child brought to South Carolina. Faced with this crisis and opportunity, Reverend Martin persuaded his parishioners that they had nothing to lose by leaving Ulster, and before long he was in charge of a small fleet of vessels bound for South Carolina. This story is recounted by Ms. Stephenson from the records of the South Carolina Council Journal and tax lists, passenger lists, church histories, and other sources housed at the South Carolina Department of Archives and History. Genealogists will want to pore over the land evidences assembled by the author from entries found in the Council Journal, namely, authorizations, survey abstracts, wills, deeds and other records which demonstrate where each family settled, or was entitled to settle. The families, which are grouped under the vessel they traveled in, are identified by the name of the household head, names of spouse and children, number of acres surveyed, county, location of the nearest body of water and the names of abutting neighbor, and the source of the information. For the reader's convenience, there is not only an index of the persons found in the list of survey entries and a separate subject index, but also a table of spelling variants. A work of exacting scholarship, Scotch-Irish Migration to South Carolina, 1772 is a crucial source on settlement of the Palmetto State on the eve of the American Revolution.
According to some estimates as many as 100,000 Scotsmen were re-settled by the British government in the Irish Plantation of Ulster during the 17th century. After the turn of the next century, the descendants of many of these Ulster Scots, better known as the Scotch-Irish, would play a major role in diversifying the population of the British colonies and, in particular, in opening up the American frontier to European settlement. The purpose of this series book is to help persons of Scotch-Irish descent make the linkage first to Ulster and then back to Scotland. Compiled from primary sources at the Scottish Record Office in Edinburgh, as well as from various burgess rolls, registers, and prerogative court records in Aberdeen, Dunbarton, Glasgow, Inveraray, London or Canterbury, the work identifies some 1,200 Scotsmen (in two alphabetically arranged lists) who resided in Ulster between the early 1600s and the early 1700s. Many of the persons so identified were young men from Ireland-many bearing Scottish surnames-attending universities in Scotland. Still other Scots-Irish links were apprentices, ministers, merchants, weavers, teachers, or persons in flight. While most of the students are described merely by name, university, and date of attendance, in a number of cases Mr. Dobson is able to provide information on the man or woman's spouse, children, local origins, landholding, and, of course, the source of the information. While there is no certainty that each of the persons identified in Scots-Irish Links or their descendants ultimately emigrated to America, undoubtedly many did or possessed kinsmen who did. It is their descendants today who will be forever indebted to Mr. Dobson for making their ancestors' origins accessible.
David Dobson sets out to overcome some of the obstacles facing North Americans attempting to trace ancestors in Ireland prior to 1820. Researchers with colonial Irish ancestors must contend with the fact that no official records of arriving immigrants exist for the United States prior to 1820, nor prior to 1865 in Canada. On the other hand, if the researcher can establish that an immigrant ancestor lived in or near a certain port of entry at a particular time, he may be able to "jump" the Atlantic by utilizing the records of the very vessels known to or likely to have transported passengers from Ireland to North America between 1623 and 1850. Modeled after a similar volume compiled by the author for Scottish vessels of this era, Ships from Ireland to Early America is an alphabetically arranged list of 1,500 vessels known to have embarked from Ireland to North America. For each vessel we learn the dates and ports of embarkation and arrival and the source of the information, and frequently the number of passengers and the name of the ship's captain. In the compilation of the volume, Mr. Dobson combed through contemporary newspapers, government records in Great Britain and North America, and a small number of published works. The author's sources are itemized and coded at the front of the volume, where the reader will also find an informative essay on the conditions of colonial transportation to North America. While Mr. Dobson makes no claims as to the comprehensiveness of this list of Irish vessels, he has nonetheless assembled another groundbreaking work on a subject of great importance to American genealogists.
"By law and by custom women's individual identities have been subsumed by those of their husbands. For centuries women were not allowed to own real estate in their own name, sign a deed, devise a will, or enter into contracts, and even their citizenship and their position as head of household have been in doubt. Finding women in traditional genealogical record sources, therefore, presents the researcher with a unique challenge, for census records, wills, land records, pension records--the conventional sources of genealogical identification--all have to be viewed in a different perspective if we are to establish the genealogical identity of our female ancestors. Whether listed under their maiden names, married names, patronymic/matronymic surnames or some other permutation, or hidden under such terms as "Mrs.," "Mistress," "goodwife," "wife of," or even "daughter of," it is clear that women are hard to find. But while women may never be as easy to locate as their male counterparts, Christina Schaefer here pioneers an approach to the problem that just might set genealogy on its head! And her solution is simplicity itself: Look closely at those areas where the female ancestor interacts with the government and the legal system, she advises, where law, precedent, and even custom mandate the unequivocal identification of all parties, male and female. According to this thesis, the legal status of women at any point in time is the key to unraveling the identity of the female ancestor, and therefore this work highlights those laws, both federal and state, that indicate when a woman could own real estate in her own name, devise a will, enter into contracts, and so on. The first part of the book--a lengthy and informative introduction--deals with the special ways women are dealt with in federal records such as immigration records, passports, naturalization records, census enumerations, land records, military records, and records dealing with minorities. All such records are discussed with reference to their impact on women, as are a group of miscellaneous, non-governmental records, including newspapers, cemetery records, city directories, church records, and state laws covering common law marriages and marriage and divorce registration. The bulk of this absorbing new reference work, however, deals with the individual states, showing how their laws, records, and resources can be used in determining female identity. Each state section begins with a time line of events, i.e. important dates in the state's history, following which is a detailed listing of eight key categories of information: (1) Marriage and Divorce (marriage and divorce laws and where to find marriage and divorce records); (2) Property and Inheritance (women's legal status in a state as reflected in statute law, code, and legislative acts); (3) Suffrage (information as to when any voting rights were granted prior to the ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1920); (4) Citizenship (dates when residents of an area became U.S. citizens); (5) Census Information (special notes on searching federal, state, and territorial enumerations); (6) Other (information on welfare, pensions, and other laws affecting women); (7) Bibliography (books and articles relating to women in the state, historical and biographical sources, and publications regarding legal history and jurisprudence); and (8) Selected Resources for Women's History (addresses of state archives, historical societies, and libraries; women's studies programs, women's history programs, and more). This engrossing new work is as amazing as it is informative: amazing because it shows how women have been written out of genealogical history; informative because it demonstrates how their identities can be recovered. This is a new and promising path in genealogy, suggesting fruitful avenues of research and many new possibilities."--Amazon.
"The Adobe Kingdom" is one of those rare things: the true story of two families across twelve generations. They came to New Mexico seeking a new homeland, not to initiate a new society but to transplant an old one. What they found, as they lived their lives in what they came to believe was one of the most beautiful places on earth, was a forbidding land, both hostile and nurturing, and not unlike the land they had left behind. Their daily contact with its remarkable landscape assured that they would remain a pastoral people centered on their herds and flocks and, at once, one with the land. Culturally isolated and little disturbed by outside influences for over two and one-half centuries, they retained their way of life. Yearning for his roots and for a return to the land of his birth, Donald Lucero follows two families across twelve generations, from their entry into New Mexico at "La Toma del Rio del Norte," in 1598, to their achievement of statehood in 1912 and beyond. This account of their journey, littered with both joys and sorrows, invites the reader to share in the New Mexico experience. Lucero is a former resident of Las Vegas, New Mexico, where he was born in his father's home, formerly the home of his paternal grandfather. He was educated in the Las Vegas schools through college, where in 1958 he received his B. A. in history from New Mexico Highlands University. After service with the U. S. Army, he served a two-year commitment with the U. S. Peace Corps in Colombia, South America. He then returned to New Mexico on a Peace Corps Preferential Fellowship to pursue graduate work in Counseling at the University of New Mexico. He received his M.A. in Counseling from this institution in 1965 and returned to complete his doctorate in Counseling Psychology in 1970. Since completion of a post-doctoral fellowship in Community Psychiatry and a second master's degree in Mental Health Administration at the University of North Carolina Medical School and School of Public Health, he has held several clinical and administrative positions in mental health. Dr. Lucero, a licensed psychologist, conducts a private practice in psychology in Raynham, Massachusetts. He is also the author of "A Nation of Shepherds" and "The Rosas Affair," both from Sunstone Press.
©2021 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.