Religion

The beloved coming-of-age novel from the author whose “name has long been synonymous with young adult fiction” (Los Angeles Times).
 
“Are You There God? It’s Me Margaret is very special.” —Amy Poehler (Vulture)
 
“Generations of teenage girls have grown up reading the tales of teenage angst told by beloved author Judy Blume.” —Mashable
 
Margaret Simon, almost twelve, has just moved from New York City to the suburbs, and she’s anxious to fit in with her new friends. When she’s asked to join a secret club she jumps at the chance. But when the girls start talking about boys, bras, and getting their first periods, Margaret starts to wonder if she’s normal. There are some things about growing up that are hard for her to talk about, even with her friends. Lucky for Margaret, she’s got someone else to confide in . . . someone who always listens.
 
“The first Judy Blume books I read. . . served as a kind of introduction to myself.” —John Green quoted in The New York Times
 
“Mention Judy Blume to almost any woman under a certain age and you're likely to get this reaction: Her face lights up, and she's transported back to her childhood self — curled up with a book she knows will speak directly to her anxieties about relationships, self-image and measuring up.” —NPR
 
“Fans, readers, booksellers — even other authors and celebrities — often dissolve into tears upon meeting [Judy Blume], confessing that books like “Forever ... ” and “Are You There, God? It’s Me, Margaret” got them through adolescence; taught them about sex, love and friendship; and provided their first glimpse of adulthood.” —The New York Times 
 
“Blume wasn’t the first writer to legitimize and celebrate the interior life of young girls. . . . But Blume’s work feels significantly more influential than that of her predecessors and peers.” —The New Yorker
 
“These stories belong to young women. Real young women.” —Diablo Cody, Entertainment Weekly
A nuanced exploration of the part that religion plays in human life, drawing on the insights of the past in order to build a faith that speaks to the needs of our dangerously polarized age.
 
Moving from the Paleolithic age to the present, Karen Armstrong details the great lengths to which humankind has gone in order to experience a sacred reality that it called by many names, such as God, Brahman, Nirvana, Allah, or Dao. Focusing especially on Christianity but including Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, and Chinese spiritualities, Armstrong examines the diminished impulse toward religion in our own time, when a significant number of people either want nothing to do with God or question the efficacy of faith. Why has God become unbelievable? Why is it that atheists and theists alike now think and speak about God in a way that veers so profoundly from the thinking of our ancestors?

Answering these questions with the same depth of knowledge and profound insight that have marked all her acclaimed books, Armstrong makes clear how the changing face of the world has necessarily changed the importance of religion at both the societal and the individual level.  Yet she cautions us that religion was never supposed to provide answers that lie within the competence of human reason; that, she says, is the role of logos. The task of religion is “to help us live creatively, peacefully, and even joyously with realities for which there are no easy explanations.” She emphasizes, too, that religion will not work automatically. It is, she says, a practical discipline: its insights are derived not from abstract speculation but from “dedicated intellectual endeavor” and a “compassionate lifestyle that enables us to break out of the prism of selfhood.”
This carefully crafted ebook: “Tao Te Ching” is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. These 81 poems comprise an Eastern classic, the mystical and moral teachings of which have profoundly influenced mankind. The Tao Te Ching is a spiritual, inspirational work that guides us through life, helping us to live within each moment and find the beauty that is all around each of us. Simple, beautiful, and life changing. The Tao Te Ching is fundamental to the Taoist school of Chinese philosophy (Dàojia), and strongly influenced other schools, such as Legalism and Neo-Confucianism. This ancient book is also central in Chinese Buddhism, which when first introduced into China. According to Chinese tradition, Lao Tzu (also known as Laozi) lived in the 6th century BCE. Historians variously contend that Lao Tzu is a synthesis of multiple historical figures, that he is a mythical figure, or that he actually lived in the 4th century BCE, concurrent with the Hundred Schools of Thought and Warring States Period. A central figure in Chinese culture, both nobility and common people claim Lao Tzu in their lineage. Throughout history, Lao Tzu's work has been embraced by various anti-authoritarian movements. Lao Tzu was a mystic philosopher of ancient China, and best known as the author of the Tao Te Ching. His association with the Tao Te Ching has led him to be traditionally considered the founder of Taoism (pronounced as "Daoism"). He is also revered as a deity in most religious forms of the Taoist religion, which often refers to Lao Tzu as Taishang Laojun, or "One of the Three Pure Ones". Lao Tzu translated literally from Chinese means "old master" or "old one", and is generally considered honorific.
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