Chemical industry

Discussing the technological supremacy of the chemical industry, including pharmaceuticals, and how it will adopt a leading position to solve some of the largest global challenges humans have even seen, this book details how the industry will address climate change, aging populations, resource scarcity, globality, networks speed, pandemics, and massive growth and demand.

Following a detailed introduction to some of the megatrends shaping our world over the forthcoming decades, the book goes on to provide several scenarios of how the world could look by 2050, including 'business as usual' and a 'sustainable' one. Chapter 3 gives a comprehensive overview of the current status, while providing a short historical review of the chemical industry, its origins, achievements and fundamentals. The following chapter reviews the potential impact of each of the selected megatrends on the industry, while Chapter 5 proposes how it could look by 2050. Several features of the chemical industry are presented and discussed, including the industrial relevance from an economical, technological and profitability point of view. The largest chemicals markets in absolute and per capita bases and the areas and countries with largest growth potential for chemicals, pharmaceuticals and feedstock. This chapter also reviews the impact of climate change on the chemical industry from a feedstocks and products point of view and, more specifically, the potential costs in reducing CO2 emissions. A final, concluding chapter summarizes the forthcoming megatrends and potential challenges, opportunities and the outlook for the industry as a whole.
An essential introduction to the organic chemicals industry—in the context of globalization, advances in technology, and environmental concerns

Providing 95 percent of the 500 billion pounds of organic chemicals produced in the world, the petroleum and natural gas industries are responsible for products that ensure our present quality of life. Products as diverse as gasoline, plastics, detergents, fibers, pesticides, tires, lipstick, shampoo, and sunscreens are based on seven raw materials derived from petroleum and natural gas. In an updated and expanded Third Edition, Industrial Organic Chemicals examines why each of these chemical building blocks—ethylene, propylene, C4 olefins (butenes and butadiene), benzene toluene, the xylenes, and methane—is preferred over another in the context of an environmental issue or manufacturing process, as well as their individual chemistry, derivatives, method of manufacture, uses, and economic significance.

The new edition details the seismic shifts in the world's chemistry industry away from the United States, Western Europe and Japan, transforming the Middle East and Asia-Pacific region, especially China, into major players. The book also details:

  • The impact of globalization on the patterns of worldwide transportation of chemicals, including methods of shipping chemicals
  • The technological advances in the area of polymerization and catalysis, including catalyst design and single-site catalysts
  • Chemicals for electronics, with much new material on conducting polymers, photovoltaic cells, and related materials
  • The discovery of vast reserves of shale gas and shale oil, altering long-term predictions of resource depletion in the United States and other countries
  • Commercial and market aspects of the chemical industry, with coverage of emerging new companies such as INEOS, Formosa Plastics, LyondellBasell, and SABIC

With expanded coverage on the vital role of green chemistry, renewables, chemicals and fuels on issues of sustainability and climate change, Industrial Organic Chemicals offers an unparalleled examination of what is at the heart of this multi-billion dollar industry, how globalization has transformed it, and its ever growing role in preserving the Earth and its resources.

Now updated - the authoritative reference on one of the most exciting and challenging areas of the modern chemical industry

This highly readable and informative reference continues to take a comprehensive, in-depth view of the products, markets, and technology of the fine chemicals industry and business. Dr. Peter Pollak, one of the foremost authorities in the field, provides an insider's unique perspective on fine chemicals from both a technological and a commercial viewpoint, covering all recent developments. He provides ample facts and figures including sixty-three tables, thirty figures, and nineteen photo inserts - making this a well-illustrated and documented text.

This reference is divided into three parts:

  • Part One: The Industry discusses the types of fine chemical companies, the range of products and services, the role of research and development, the underlying technologies, and the challenges facing management

  • Part Two: The Business explores the key markets for fine chemicals - such as the pharmaceutical, agrochemical, and animal health industries - and the relevant marketing strategies, as well as the ins and outs of pricing, distribution channels, intellectual property rights, account management, and promotion

  • Part Three: Outlook examines trends such as globalization and outsourcing, forecasts future growth and development by industry segment, and discusses prerequisites for success in the field

This new edition features both updated and new information on the offer/demand balance for fine chemicals and the escalating impact of emerging companies in Asia, particularly from China and India. It describes the inversion of the mergers and acquisitions scenario from a seller's to a buyer's market, the broadening of the fine chemical business model, and the expanding role of biotechnology, as well as the impact of increased outsourcing of chemical manufacturing and the growing consumption of pharmaceuticals and agrochemicals by the life science industry. Also included are numerous molecular structures, engineering diagrams, and tables to facilitate understanding.

For a thorough understanding of the technology, the business, and the future of the fine chemicals industry, this book's insight is unprecedented. It is ideally suited for those in the industry - including employees, suppliers, customers, investors, and consulting companies - as well as academic and other research organizations, students and educators, public officials, media representatives, and anyone else who wants to understand the intricacies of the industry.


Fine Chemicals has been recognized as Outstanding Academic Title 2012 (Choice, v.50, no. 05, January 2013).

In recent years many developments have taken place in promote co-operation between governments and other the field of risk assessment of chemicals. Many reports parties involved in chemical safety and to provide policy have been published by national authorities, industries guidance with emphasis on regional and subregional co and scientific researchers as well as by international bod operation. The Inter-Organization Programme for the ies such as the European Union, the Organization of Sound Management of Chemicals (IOMC) was estab Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and lished in 1995 and provides a mechanism for the six par the joint International Programme on Chemical Safety ticipating organizations (UNEP, ILO, FAO, UNIDO,WHO (IPCS) of the World Health Organization (WHO), the and OECD) to better co-ordinate policies and activities in International Labour Organization (lLO), and the United the field of chemical risk management. Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). The present book is an introduction to risk assessment of The development and international harmonization of risk chemicals. It contains basic background information on assessment methods is an important challenge. In sources, emissions, distribution and fate processes for Agenda 21 of the United Nations Conference on exposure estimation. It includes dose-effects estimation Environment and Development (UNCED), chapter 19 is for both human health related toxicology and ecotoxicol entirely devoted to the management of chemicals. For ogy as well as information on estimation methodologies. one of its recommendations, i. e.
It’s the new rock and roll. It’s the new black. Sustainability is trendy, and not just among hipsters and pop stars. The uncool chemical sector helped pioneer it, and today, companies inside and outside the sector have embraced it. But what have they embraced? Surely not the Brundtland definition of meeting “the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.”

Sustainability describes a change in the chemical industry’s approach to the external world: to regulators, to greens, to neighbors, to investors and to the general public. Displacing the adversarialism of the 1970s-80s, sustainability is a new approach to social/political conflict, and an attempt to rebuild the industry’s long-suffering public image. In practice, it consists of:
A ‘stakeholder’ approach to communications and external relations
A rebranding of regulatory compliance and risk management, with the emphasis on their benefits to stakeholders
Recognition (and even celebration) of the opportunities, not just the costs, of environmental and social protection

The core of this book is a survey of the world’s 29 largest chemical companies: how they put sustainability into action (six of the 29 do not), and the six ‘sustainability brands’ they have created. It begins with a history of stakeholders conflict, before looking at various definitions of sustainability – by academics, by the public and by investors. After the survey and analysis, the book covers sustainability and ‘greenwash’ plus the ROI of sustainability, and it gives five recommendations.

The petroleum and chemical industries contain a wide variety of corrosive environments, many of which
are unique to these industries. Oil and gas production operations consume a tremendous amount of iron
and steel pipe, tubing, pumps, valves, and sucker rods. Metallic corrosion is costly. However, the cost of
corrosion is not just financial. Beyond the huge direct outlay of funds to repair or replace corroded structures are the indirect costs – natural resources, potential hazards, and lost opportunity. Wasting natural resources is a direct contradiction to the growing need for sustainable development.

By selecting the correct material and applying proper corrosion protection methods, these costs can be
reduced, or even eliminated. This book provides a minimum design requirement for consideration when
designing systems in order to prevent or control corrosion damage safely and economically, and addresses:

• Corrosion problems in petroleum and chemical industries
• Requirements for corrosion control
• Chemical control of corrosive environments
• Corrosion inhibitors in refineries and petrochemical plants
• Materials selection and service life of materials
• Surface preparation, protection and maintainability
• Corrosion monitoring - plant inspection techniques and laboratory corrosion testing techniques

Intended for engineers and industry personnel working in the petroleum and chemical industries, this book is also a valuable resource for research and development teams, safety engineers, corrosion specialists and researchers in chemical engineering, engineering and materials science.

Industrial products that are made from, or contain, nitrogen are described in parts of some encyclopedias and standard reference works. However it is not always simple to determine from these varied sources the present status of the technology and markets for various nitrogen products. We therefore perceived a need for a text that provides a comprehensive description of: 1) products that are made from or that contain nitrogen; 2) the processes that produce these products; and 3) the markets that consume these products. I have attempted to present the material in a standardized format that should make this book easy to use and helpful to the readers. The standard format for each product is: Introduction, Process, Production, and Uses, with some variations in different chapters. This book provides information that could be used by a wide range of readers: Fertilizer companies—to evaluate different production processes and review general trends in the market. Basic chemical companies—to evaluate different production processes and review general trends in the market. Specialty chemical companies—to investigate new chemical production and/or sales opportunities and the processes that could make those sales a possibility. Chemical distributors—to obtain a feel for the general market size for some chemicals and the basic handling and distribution procedures for various chemicals. Engineering Companies—to evaluate different production processes and review general trends in the market. Engineering and Chemistry Students—to learn more about practical applications of the principals that they have experienced in their classrooms and laboratories.
The tremendous progress in biology over the last half century - from Watson and Crick's elucidation of the structure of DNA to today's astonishing, rapid progress in the field of synthetic biology - has positioned us for significant innovation in chemical production. New bio-based chemicals, improved public health through improved drugs and diagnostics, and biofuels that reduce our dependency on oil are all results of research and innovation in the biological sciences. In the past decade, we have witnessed major advances made possible by biotechnology in areas such as rapid, low-cost DNA sequencing, metabolic engineering, and high-throughput screening. The manufacturing of chemicals using biological synthesis and engineering could expand even faster. A proactive strategy - implemented through the development of a technical roadmap similar to those that enabled sustained growth in the semiconductor industry and our explorations of space - is needed if we are to realize the widespread benefits of accelerating the industrialization of biology.

Industrialization of Biology presents such a roadmap to achieve key technical milestones for chemical manufacturing through biological routes. This report examines the technical, economic, and societal factors that limit the adoption of bioprocessing in the chemical industry today and which, if surmounted, would markedly accelerate the advanced manufacturing of chemicals via industrial biotechnology. Working at the interface of synthetic chemistry, metabolic engineering, molecular biology, and synthetic biology, Industrialization of Biology identifies key technical goals for next-generation chemical manufacturing, then identifies the gaps in knowledge, tools, techniques, and systems required to meet those goals, and targets and timelines for achieving them. This report also considers the skills necessary to accomplish the roadmap goals, and what training opportunities are required to produce the cadre of skilled scientists and engineers needed.

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