Military engineering

In light of increasing economic and international threats, military operations must be examined with a critical eye in terms of process design, management, improvement, and control. Although the Pentagon and militaries around the world have utilized industrial engineering (IE) concepts to achieve this goal for decades, there has been no single resource to bring together IE applications with a focus on improving military operations. Until now.

Winner of the 2010 IIE/Joint Publishers Book-of-the-Year Award

The Handbook of Military Industrial Engineering is the first compilation of the fundamental tools, principles, and modeling techniques of industrial engineering with specific and direct application to military systems. Globally respected IE experts provide proven strategies that can help any military organization effectively create, adapt, utilize, and deploy resources, tools, and technology.

Topics covered include: Supply Chain Management and decision making Lean Enterprise Concepts for military operations Modeling and optimization Economic planning for military systems Contingency planning and logistics Human factors and ergonomics Information management and control

Civilian engineers working on systems analysis, project management, process design, and operations research will also find inspiration and useful ideas on how to effectively apply the concepts covered for non-military uses.

On the battlefield and in business, victory goes to those who utilize their resources most effectively, especially in times of operational crisis. The Handbook of Military Industrial Engineering is a complete reference that will serve as an invaluable resource for those looking to make the operational improvements needed to accomplish the mission at hand.

Naval, aeronautic, and mechanical engineers played a powerful part in the military buildup of Japan in the early and mid-twentieth century. They belonged to a militaristic regime and embraced the importance of their role in it. Takashi Nishiyama examines the impact of war and peace on technological transformation during the twentieth century. He is the first to study the paradoxical and transformative power of Japan’s defeat in World War II through the lens of engineering.

Nishiyama asks: How did authorities select and prepare young men to be engineers? How did Japan develop curricula adequate to the task (and from whom did the country borrow)? Under what conditions? What did the engineers think of the planes they built to support Kamikaze suicide missions? But his study ultimately concerns the remarkable transition these trained engineers made after total defeat in 1945. How could the engineers of war machines so quickly turn to peaceful construction projects such as designing the equipment necessary to manufacture consumer products? Most important, they developed new high-speed rail services, including the Shinkansen Bullet Train. What does this change tell us not only about Japan at war and then in peacetime but also about the malleability of engineering cultures?

Nishiyama aims to counterbalance prevalent Eurocentric/Americentric views in the history of technology. Engineering War and Peace in Modern Japan, 1868–1964 sets the historical experience of one country’s technological transformation in a larger international framework by studying sources in six different languages: Chinese, English, French, German, Japanese, and Spanish. The result is a fascinating read for those interested in technology, East Asia, and international studies. Nishiyama's work offers lessons to policymakers interested in how a country can recover successfully after defeat.

-- Shigeru Nakayama, Professor Emeritus, Kanagawa University
On May 25, 1863, after driving the Confederate army into defensive lines surrounding Vicksburg, Mississippi, Union major general Ulysses S. Grant and his Army of the Tennessee laid siege to the fortress city. With no reinforcements and dwindling supplies, the Army of Vicksburg finally surrendered on July 4, yielding command of the Mississippi River to Union forces and effectively severing the Confederacy. In this illuminating volume, Justin S. Solonick offers the first detailed study of how Grant’s midwesterners serving in the Army of the Tennessee engineered the siege of Vicksburg, placing the event within the broader context of U.S. and European military history and nineteenth-century applied science in trench warfare and field fortifications. In doing so, he shatters the Lost Cause myth that Vicksburg’s Confederate garrison surrendered due to lack of provisions. Instead of being starved out, Solonick explains, the Confederates were dug out.

After opening with a sophisticated examination of nineteenth-century military engineering and the history of siege craft, Solonick discusses the stages of the Vicksburg siege and the implements and tactics Grant’s soldiers used to achieve victory. As Solonick shows, though Grant lacked sufficient professional engineers to organize a traditional siege—an offensive tactic characterized by cutting the enemy’s communication lines and digging forward-moving approach trenches—the few engineers available, when possible, gave Union troops a crash course in military engineering. Ingenious midwestern soldiers, in turn, creatively applied engineering maxims to the situation at Vicksburg, demonstrating a remarkable ability to adapt in the face of adversity. When instruction and oversight were not possible, the common soldiers improvised. Solonick concludes with a description of the surrender of Vicksburg, an analysis of the siege’s effect on the outcome of the Civil War, and a discussion of its significance in western military history.

Solonick’s study of the Vicksburg siege focuses on how the American Civil War was a transitional one with its own distinct nature, not the last Napoleonic war or the herald of modern warfare. At Vicksburg, he reveals, a melding of traditional siege craft with the soldiers’ own inventiveness resulted in Union victory during the largest, most successful siege in American history.

Handbook of Defence Electronics and Optronics

Anil K. Maini, Former Director, Laser Science and Technology Centre, India

First complete reference on defence electronics and optronics

Fundamentals, Technologies and Systems

This book provides a complete account of defence electronics and optronics. The content is broadly divided into three categories: topics specific to defence electronics; topics relevant to defence optronics; and topics that have both electronics and optronics counterparts.

The book covers each of the topics in their entirety from fundamentals to advanced concepts, military systems in use and related technologies, thereby leading the reader logically from the operational basics of military systems to involved technologies and battlefield deployment and applications.

Key features:

• Covers fundamentals, operational aspects, involved technologies and application potential of a large cross-section of military systems.

Discusses emerging technology trends and development and deployment status of next generation military systems wherever applicable in each category of military systems.

• Amply illustrated with approximately 1000 diagrams and photographs and around 30 tables.

• Includes salient features, technologies and deployment aspects of hundreds of military systems, including: military radios; ground and surveillance radars; laser range finder and target designators; night visions devices; EW and EO jammers; laser guided munitions; and military communications equipment and satellites.

Handbook of Defence Electronics and Optronics is an essential guide for graduate students, R&D scientists, engineers engaged in manufacturing defence equipment and professionals handling the operation and maintenance of these systems in the Armed Forces.

The German Tiger I and Tiger II (known to the Allies as the 'King Tiger' or 'Royal Tiger') were the most famous and formidable heavy tanks of the Second World War. In their day their awesome reputation inspired such apprehension among Allied soldiers that the weaknesses of these brilliant but flawed designs tended to be overlooked. Anthony Tucker-Jones, in this illustrated history, tells the story of their conception and development and reconsiders their operational history, and he dispels the legends and misunderstandings that have grown up around them.The Tigers were over-engineered, required raw materials that were in short supply, were time-consuming to manufacture and difficult to recover from the battlefield. Only around 1,300 of the Tiger I and fewer than 500 of the Tiger II were produced, so they were never going to make anything more than a local impact on the outcome of the fighting. Yet the myth of the Tigers, with their 88mm guns, thick armour and brutal profiles, has grown over time to the extent that they are regarded as the deadliest tanks of the Second World War.Anthony Tucker-Jones's expert account of these remarkable fighting vehicles is accompanied by a series of colour plates showing the main variants of the designs and the common ancillary equipment and unit markings.Anthony Tucker-Jones is a prolific writer on the history of fighting vehicles and armoured warfare. He has also written extensively on military affairs and terrorism. After a career in the intelligence community, he became a freelance defence writer and military historian. His most recent books are Armoured Warfare on the Eastern Front, Armoured Warfare in the North African Campaign, Armoured Warfare in the Battle for Normandy, The Kalashnikov in Combat and The Soviet-Afghan War.
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