More by Theodore Roosevelt

A life of slothful ease, a life of that peace which springs merely from lack of either of desire or of power to strive after great things, is as little worthy of a nation as of an individual. I ask only that what every self-respecting American demands from himself and from his sons shall be demanded of the American nation as a whole. Who among you would teach your boys that ease, that peace, is to be the first consideration in their eyes?-from "The Strenuous Life"Of all the many sides of Theodore Roosevelt-politician and soldier, naturalist and historian-today he remains a grand symbol of booming American progress in the 20th century. Indeed, he is largely responsible for setting the nation on the course it has followed over those hundred years, as this 1904 volume handily demonstrates. This collection of speeches Roosevelt gave and essays he wrote from 1899 through 1901 illuminates his keen image of America as a nation strong of character, honest of leadership, and rich in material and moral wealth-and represents the splendid challenge he extended to the American people to match him in action and in spirit, and to create a political and social life for the country as robust as his own personal and public life was. This is, in the aggregate, a revealing picture of the character of one of the great American personalities.Also available from Cosimo Classics: Roosevelt's Letters to His Children, A Book-Lover's Holidays in the Open, America and the World War, Through the Brazilian Wilderness and Papers on Natural History, Ranch Life and the Hunting Trail, and Historic Towns: New YorkOF INTEREST TO: Roosevelt fans, students of the American presidency, readers of 20th-century U.S. and world historyAmerican icon THEODORE ROOSEVELT (1858-1919) was 26th President of the United States, serving from 1901 to 1909, and the first American to win a Nobel Prize, in 1906, when he was awarded the Peace Prize for mediating the Russo-Japanese War. He is the author of 35 books.
The one permanent move for obtaining peace, which has not yet been suggested, with any reasonable chance of attaining its object, is by an agreement among the great powers, in which each should pledge itself not only to abide by the decisions of a common tribunal but to back with force the decisions of that common tribunal. The great civilized nations of the world which do possess force, actual or immediately potential, should combine by solemn agreement in a great World League for the Peace of Righteousness. -from "World Peace"Theodore Roosevelt was still a young man when he left the Oval Office, and he remained a vigorous force on the American scene. The great influence he continued to hold over the public allowed him to contest the policies of President Woodrow Wilson, particularly Wilson's conduct in the leadup to America's belated entry into World War I. In this 1915 work, Roosevelt lays out the moral and political case for coming to the aid of the nation's European allies, from the ethics of self-defense to the practicalities of preparing for war.Roosevelt's arguments are compelling and humane, but agree with him or not, here is an essential part of the powerful basis for his place in American history as the architect of the American Century, as well as a revealing picture of the character of one of the great American personalities.Also available from Cosimo Classics: Roosevelt's Letters to His Children, A Book-Lover's Holidays in the Open, Through the Brazilian Wilderness and Papers on Natural History, Ranch Life and the Hunting Trail, The Strenuous Life: Essays and Addresses, and Historic Towns: New YorkOF INTEREST TO: Roosevelt fans, students of the American presidency, readers of World War IPolitician and soldier, naturalist and historian, American icon THEODORE ROOSEVELT (1858-1919) was 26th President of the United States, serving from 1901 to 1909, and the first American to win a Nobel Prize, in 1906, when he was awarded the Peace Prize for mediating the Russo-Japanese War. He is the author of 35 books.
The firsthand account of the life of adventurer, scholar, war hero, and twenty-sixth president of the United States Theodore Roosevelt.

There must be the keenest sense of duty, and with it must go the joy of living.
 
Here, in his own words, Theodore Roosevelt recounts his remarkable journey from a childhood plagued with illnesses to the US presidency and beyond. With candor and vivid detail, this personal account describes a life guided by a restless intelligence, a love for adventure, and an unflagging duty to his country. Roosevelt sheds light on his wide array of roles, from New York police commissioner, where he waged a battle against corruption, to cattle rancher in the Dakotas to assistant secretary of the US Navy under William McKinley to leader of the legendary Rough Riders at the outbreak of the Spanish–American War, when he led the 1st United States Volunteer Cavalry to victory in the Battle of San Juan Hill.
 
These extraordinary accomplishments earned Roosevelt national fame and set the stage for his ascent to the White House. As twenty-sixth president of the United States, he ushered in the Progressive Era with his domestic policies, such as the Square Deal, and trust-busting of monopolies, such as Standard Oil. He was a war hero, scholar, statesman, adventurer, and Nobel Peace Prize winner. Theodore Roosevelt: An Autobiography provides unique insight into the truly remarkable life of one of America’s most beloved presidents.
 
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This eBook has been formatted to the highest digital standards and adjusted for readability on all devices. This four-volume edition by one of the most admired Presidents of the United States thoroughly explains the historical process of the conquest of the American West and how the Americans fought Indian tribes, British, French, and Spanish troops to become the greatest power of the world. Contents: From the Alleghanies to the Mississippi 1769-1776 The Spread of the English-speaking Peoples The French of the Ohio Valley The Appalachian Confederacies The Algonquins of the Northwest Boon and the Long Hunters; and Their Hunting in No-man's-land Sevier, Robertson, and the Watauga Commonwealth Lord Dunmore's War The Battle of the Great Kanawha; and Logan's Speech Boon and the Settlement of Kentucky The Southern Backwoodsmen Overwhelm the Cherokees Growth and Civil Organization of Kentucky From the Alleghanies to the Mississippi 1777-1783 The War in the Northwest Clark's Conquest of the Illinois Clark's Campaign Against Vincennes Continuance of the Struggle in Kentucky The Moravian Massacre Kentucky Until the End of the Revolution The Holston Settlements King's Mountain Robertson Founds the Cumberland Settlement What the Westerners Had Done During the Revolution The Founding of the Trans- Alleghany Commonwealths 1784-1790 The Inrush of Settlers The Indian Wars The Navigation of the Mississippi Separatist Movements and Spanish Intrigues Kentucky's Struggle for Statehood The War in the Northwest…
This carefully crafted ebook: "The Winning of the West: A History of the American Frontiers" is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. This four-volume edition by one of the most admired Presidents of the United States thoroughly explains the historical process of the conquest of the American West and how the Americans fought Indian tribes, British, French, and Spanish troops to become the greatest power of the world. Contents: From the Alleghanies to the Mississippi 1769-1776 The Spread of the English-speaking Peoples The French of the Ohio Valley The Appalachian Confederacies The Algonquins of the Northwest Boon and the Long Hunters; and Their Hunting in No-man's-land Sevier, Robertson, and the Watauga Commonwealth Lord Dunmore's War The Battle of the Great Kanawha; and Logan's Speech Boon and the Settlement of Kentucky The Southern Backwoodsmen Overwhelm the Cherokees Growth and Civil Organization of Kentucky From the Alleghanies to the Mississippi 1777-1783 The War in the Northwest Clark's Conquest of the Illinois Clark's Campaign Against Vincennes Continuance of the Struggle in Kentucky The Moravian Massacre Kentucky Until the End of the Revolution The Holston Settlements King's Mountain Robertson Founds the Cumberland Settlement What the Westerners Had Done During the Revolution The Founding of the Trans- Alleghany Commonwealths 1784-1790 The Inrush of Settlers The Indian Wars The Navigation of the Mississippi Separatist Movements and Spanish Intrigues Kentucky's Struggle for Statehood The War in the Northwest…
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