More by Jack London

The Call of the Wild is a short adventure novel by Jack London, published in 1903 and set in Yukon, Canada, during the 1890s Klondike Gold Rush, when strong sled dogs were in high demand. The central character of the novel is a dog named Buck. The story opens at a ranch in Santa Clara Valley, California, when Buck is stolen from his home and sold into service as a sled dog in Alaska. He becomes progressively feral in the harsh environment, where he is forced to fight to survive and dominate other dogs. By the end, he sheds the veneer of civilization, and relies on primordial instinct and learned experience to emerge as a leader in the wild. The Call of the Wild was enormously popular from the moment it was published. H. L. Menken wrote of London's story: "No other popular writer of his time did any better writing than you will find in The Call of the Wild." A reviewer for The New York Times wrote of it in 1903: "If nothing else makes Mr. London's book popular, it ought to be rendered so by the complete way in which it will satisfy the love of dog fights apparently inherent in every man." The reviewer for The Atlantic Monthly wrote that it was a book: "untouched by bookishness...The making and the achievement of such a hero [Buck] constitute, not a pretty story at all, but a very powerful one." After the success of The Call of the Wild London wrote to Macmillan in 1904 proposing a second book (White Fang) in which he wanted to describe the opposite of Buck: a dog that transforms from wild to tame: "I'm going to reverse the process...Instead of devolution of decivilization ... I'm going to give the evolution, the civilization of a dog. Famous works of the author Jack London: "The Cruise of the Dazzler", "A Daughter of the Snows", "The Call of the Wild", "The Kempton-Wace Letters", "The Sea-Wolf", "The Game", "White Fang", "The Iron Heel", "Martin Eden", "Burning Daylight", "A Son of the Sun", "The Abysmal Brute", "The Valley of the Moon", "The Mutiny of the Elsinore", "The Star Rover", "The Little Lady of the Big House".
This carefully edited collection has been designed and formatted to the highest digital standards and adjusted for readability on all devices. Jack London is best known as the author of The Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire", "An Odyssey of the North", and "Love of Life". Content: The Son of the Wolf (1900): The White Silence, The Son of the Wolf, The Men of Forty Mile, In a Far Country, To the Man on the Trail, The Priestly Prerogative, The Wisdom of the Trail, The Wife of a King, An Odyssey of the North. - The God of His Fathers: Tales of the Klondike (1901): The God of His Fathers, The Great Interrogation, Which Make Men Remember, Siwash, The Man with the Gash, Jan, the Unrepentant, Grit of Women, Where the Trail Forks, A Daughter of the Aurora, At the Rainbow's End, The Scorn of Women. - Children of the Frost (1902): In the Forests of the North, The Law of Life, Nam-Bok the Unveracious, The Master of Mystery, The Sunlanders, The Sickness of Lone Chief, Keesh, the Son of Keesh, The Death of Ligoun, Li Wan, the Fair, The League of the Old Men. - The Faith of Men (1904): A Relic of the Pliocene, A Hyperborean Brew, The Faith of Men, Too Much Gold, The One Thousand Dozen, The Marriage of Lit-lit, Bâtard, The Story of Jees Uck. - Love of Life & Other Stories (1907): Love of Life, A Day's Lodging, The White Man's Way, The Story of Keesh, The Unexpected, Brown Wolf, The Sun Dog Trail, Negore, The Coward. - Lost Face (1910): Lost Face, Trust, To Build a Fire, That Spot, Flush of Gold, The Passing of Marcus O'Brien, The Wit of Porportuk. - Smoke Bellew (1902): The Taste of the Meat, The Meat, The Stampede to Squaw Creek, Shorty Dreams, The Man on the Other Bank, The Race for Number Three.
The Call of the Wild is regarded as Jack London's masterpiece. Based on London's experiences as a gold prospector in the Canadian wilderness and his ideas about nature and the struggle for existence, The Call of the Wild is a tale about unbreakable spirit and the fight for survival in the frozen Alaskan Klondike. The story takes place in the extreme conditions of the Yukon during the 19th-century Klondike Gold Rush where strong sled dogs were in high demand. After Buck, a domesticated dog, is snatched from a pastoral ranch in California, he is sold into a brutal life as a sled dog. The work details Buck's struggle to adjust and survive the cruel treatment he receives from humans, other dogs, and nature. He eventually sheds the veneer of civilization altogether and instead relies on primordial instincts and the lessons he has learned to become a respected and feared leader in the wild. White Fang is the story of a wild dog's journey toward becoming civilized in the Canadian territory of Yukon during the Klondike gold rush at the end of the nineteenth century. White Fang is a companion novel (and a thematic mirror) to Jack London's best-known work, The Call of the Wild, which concerns a kidnapped civilized dog turning into a wild wolf. The book is characteristic of London's precise prose style and his innovative use of voice and perspective. Much of the novel is written from the viewpoint of the animals, allowing London to explore how animals view their world and how they view humans. Jack London (1876–1916) was an American novelist, journalist, and social activist. A pioneer in the world of commercial magazine fiction, he was one of the first writers to become a worldwide celebrity and earn a large fortune from writing. He was also an innovator in the genre that would later become known as science fiction.
 "No other popular writer of his time did any better writing than you will find in Call of the Wild." —H.L. Menken 

"If nothing else makes Mr. London's book popular, it ought to be rendered so by the complete way in which it will satisfy the love of dog fights apparently inherent in every man." 
— The New York Times 

"…untouched by bookishness... The making and the achievement of such a hero [Buck] constitute, not a pretty story at all, but a very powerful one." 
— The Atlantic Monthly 

A gripping, fast-paced tale of adventure, The Call of the Wild focuses on Buck, a pampered sheepdog stolen from a California ranch and endures a harrowing journey into the Yukon. He is sold to men who use dogs to pull sleds carrying mail to the gold prospectors in Alaska. 

In the course of this story, Buck tangles with other dogs, the forces of nature and packs of wolves. He must deal with human brutality and hardship but eventually claims his own nature as a wild creature after being cared for by a rough but kind man. 

This book is a riveting experience, written by a true master of literature. 



About the Publisher 

Authors Jacob Nordby and Aaron Patterson founded Stonehenge Classics to restore timeless classics for the digital age and provide modern readers with new reasons to rediscover books that connect us to our past treasures of truth, beauty, and wisdom. 

More Titles in the Stonehenge Classics Literature Series 

don Quixote – Miguel de Cervantes 
Peter Pan – J.M. Barrie 
Treasure Island – Robert Louis Stevenson 
Kidnapped – Robert Louis Stevenson 
The Count of Monte Cristo – Alexandre Dumas 
Dracula – Bram Stoker 
A Tale of Two Cities – Charles Dickens 
The Legend of Sleepy Hollow – Washington Irving 
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland – Lewis Carroll 
The Picture of Dorian Gray – Oscar Wilde 
The War of the Worlds – H.G. Wells 
and many others...
This carefully crafted ebook collection is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. Jack London (1876-1916) was an American novelist, journalist, and social activist. His amazing life experience also includes being an oyster pirate, railroad hobo, gold prospector, sailor, war correspondent and much more. He wrote adventure novels & sea tales, stories of the Gold Rush, tales of the South Pacific and the San Francisco Bay area - most of which were based on or inspired by his own life experiences. Content: The Cruise of the Dazzler A Daughter of the Snows The Call of the Wild The Kempton-Wace Letters The Sea-Wolf The Game White Fang Before Adam The Iron Heel Martin Eden Burning Daylight Adventure The Scarlet Plague A Son of the Sun The Abysmal Brute The Valley of the Moon The Mutiny of the Elsinore The Star Rover The Little Lady of the Big House Jerry of the Islands Michael, Brother of Jerry Hearts of Three Son of the Wolf The God of His Fathers Children of the Frost The Faith of Men Tales of the Fish Patrol Moon-Face Love of Life Lost Face South Sea Tales When God Laughs The House of Pride & Other Tales of Hawaii Smoke Bellew The Night Born The Strength of the Strong The Turtles of Tasman The Human Drift The Red One On the Makaloa Mat Dutch Courage Uncollected Stories The Road The Cruise of the Snark John Barleycorn The People of the Abyss Theft Daughters of the Rich The Acorn-Planter A Wicked Woman The Birth Mark The First Poet Scorn of Woman Revolution and Other Essays The War of the Classes What Socialism Is What Communities Lose by the Competitive System Through The Rapids on the Way to the Klondike From Dawson to the Sea Our Adventures in Tampico With Funston's Men The Joy of Small Boat Sailing Husky, Wolf Dog of the North The Impossibility of War The Red Game of War Mexico's Army and Ours The Trouble Makers of Mexico Phenomena of Literary Evolution Editorial Crimes – A Protest Again the Literary Aspirant ...
This carefully edited collection has been designed and formatted to the highest digital standards and adjusted for readability on all devices. Jack London (1876-1916) was an American novelist, journalist, and social activist. His amazing life experience also includes being an oyster pirate, railroad hobo, gold prospector, sailor, war correspondent and much more. He wrote adventure novels & sea tales, stories of the Gold Rush, tales of the South Pacific and the San Francisco Bay area - most of which were based on or inspired by his own life experiences. Content: The Cruise of the Dazzler A Daughter of the Snows The Call of the Wild The Kempton-Wace Letters The Sea-Wolf The Game White Fang Before Adam The Iron Heel Martin Eden Burning Daylight Adventure The Scarlet Plague A Son of the Sun The Abysmal Brute The Valley of the Moon The Mutiny of the Elsinore The Star Rover The Little Lady of the Big House Jerry of the Islands Michael, Brother of Jerry Hearts of Three Son of the Wolf The God of His Fathers Children of the Frost The Faith of Men Tales of the Fish Patrol Moon-Face Love of Life Lost Face South Sea Tales When God Laughs The House of Pride & Other Tales of Hawaii Smoke Bellew The Night Born The Strength of the Strong The Turtles of Tasman The Human Drift The Red One On the Makaloa Mat Dutch Courage Uncollected Stories The Road The Cruise of the Snark John Barleycorn The People of the Abyss Theft Daughters of the Rich The Acorn-Planter A Wicked Woman The Birth Mark The First Poet Scorn of Woman Revolution and Other Essays The War of the Classes What Socialism Is What Communities Lose by the Competitive System Through The Rapids on the Way to the Klondike From Dawson to the Sea Our Adventures in Tampico With Funston's Men The Joy of Small Boat Sailing Husky, Wolf Dog of the North The Impossibility of War...
THE PEOPLE OF THE ABYSS

by Jack London

AUTHOR'S PREFACE.

THE EXPERIENCES RELATED in this volume fell to me in the summer of

1902. I went down into the under-world of London with an attitude of

mind which I may best liken to that of the explorer. I was open to

be convinced by the evidence of my eyes, rather than by the

teachings of those who had not seen, or by the words of those who

had seen and gone before. Further, I took with me certain simple

criteria with which to measure the life of the under-world. That which

made for more life, for physical and spiritual health, was good;

that which made for less life, which hurt, and dwarfed, and

distorted life, was bad.

It will be readily apparent to the reader that I saw much that was

bad. Yet it must not be forgotten that the time of which I write was

considered 'good times' in England. The starvation and lack of shelter

I encountered constituted a chronic condition of misery which is never

wiped out, even in the periods of greatest prosperity.

Following the summer in question came a hard winter. To such an

extent did the suffering and positive starvation increase that society

was unable to cope with it. Great numbers of the unemployed formed

into processions, as many as a dozen at a time, and daily marched

through the streets of London crying for bread. Mr. Justin McCarthy,

writing in the month of January, 1903, to the New York Independent,

briefly epitomizes the situation as follows:-

'The workhouses have no space left in which to pack the starving

crowds who are craving every day and night at their doors for food and

shelter. All the charitable institutions have exhausted their means in

trying to raise supplies of food for the famishing residents of the

garrets and cellars of London lanes and alleys. The quarters of the

Salvation Army in various parts of London are nightly besieged by

hosts of the unemployed and the hungry for whom neither shelter nor

the means of sustenance can be provided.'

It has been urged that the criticism I have passed on things as they

are in England is too pessimistic. I must say, in extenuation, that of

optimists I am the most optimistic. But I measure manhood less by

political aggregations than by individuals. Society grows, while

political machines rack to pieces and become 'scrap.' For the English,

so far as manhood and womanhood and health and happiness go, I see a

broad and smiling future. But for a great deal of the political

machinery, which at present mismanages for them, I see nothing else

than the scrap heap.

JACK LONDON.

Piedmont, California.


《深淵居民》是傑克·倫敦描寫1902年倫敦東區人民生活的一部著作。其內容都是他自己的親身體驗,數月裡他一直呆在該地區的濟貧院甚至露宿街頭以體驗生活。當時倫敦大約有50萬有類似遭遇的人們



THE IRON HEEL

by Jack London

FOREWORD.

IT CANNOT BE SAID THAT THE Everhard Manuscript is an important

historical document. To the historian it bristles with errors- not

errors of fact, but errors of interpretation. Looking back across

the seven centuries that have lapsed since Avis Everhard completed her

manuscript, events, and the bearings of events, that were confused and

veiled to her, are clear to us. She lacked perspective. She was too

close to the events she writes about. Nay, she was merged in the

events she has described.

Nevertheless, as a personal document, the Everhard Manuscript is

of inestimable value. But here again enter error of perspective, and

vitiation due to the bias of love. Yet we smile, indeed, and forgive

Avis Everhard for the heroic lines upon which she modelled her

husband. We know to-day that he was not so colossal, and that he

loomed among the events of his times less largely than the

Manuscript would lead us to believe.

We know that Ernest Everhard was an exceptionally strong man, but

not so exceptional as his wife thought him to be. He was, after all,

but one of a large number of heroes who, throughout the world, devoted

their lives to the Revolution; though it must be conceded that he

did unusual work, especially in his elaboration and interpretation

of working-class philosophy. 'Proletarian science' and 'proletarian

philosophy' were his phrases for it, and therein he shows the

provincialism of his mind- a defect, however, that was due to the

times and that none in that day could escape.

But to return to the Manuscript. Especially valuable is it in

communicating to us the feel of those terrible times. Nowhere do we

find more vividly portrayed the psychology of the persons that lived

in that turbulent period embraced between the years 1912 and 1932-

their mistakes and ignorance, their doubts and fears and

misapprehensions, their ethical delusions, their violent passions,

their inconceivable sordidness and selfishness. These are the things

that are so hard for us of this enlightened age to understand. History

tells us that these things were, and biology and psychology tell us

why they were; but history and biology and psychology do not make

these things alive. We accept them as facts, but we are left without

sympathetic comprehension of them.
Martin Eden

by Jack London

CHAPTER I

The one opened the door with a latch-key and went in, followed by a

young fellow who awkwardly removed his cap. He wore rough clothes

that smacked of the sea, and he was manifestly out of place in the

spacious hall in which he found himself. He did not know what to

do with his cap, and was stuffing it into his coat pocket when the

other took it from him. The act was done quietly and naturally,

and the awkward young fellow appreciated it. "He understands," was

his thought. "He'll see me through all right."

He walked at the other's heels with a swing to his shoulders, and

his legs spread unwittingly, as if the level floors were tilting up

and sinking down to the heave and lunge of the sea. The wide rooms

seemed too narrow for his rolling gait, and to himself he was in

terror lest his broad shoulders should collide with the doorways or

sweep the bric-a-brac from the low mantel. He recoiled from side

to side between the various objects and multiplied the hazards that

in reality lodged only in his mind. Between a grand piano and a

centre-table piled high with books was space for a half a dozen to

walk abreast, yet he essayed it with trepidation. His heavy arms

hung loosely at his sides. He did not know what to do with those

arms and hands, and when, to his excited vision, one arm seemed

liable to brush against the books on the table, he lurched away

like a frightened horse, barely missing the piano stool. He

watched the easy walk of the other in front of him, and for the

first time realized that his walk was different from that of other

men. He experienced a momentary pang of shame that he should walk

so uncouthly. The sweat burst through the skin of his forehead in

tiny beads, and he paused and mopped his bronzed face with his

handkerchief.

"Hold on, Arthur, my boy," he said, attempting to mask his anxiety

with facetious utterance. "This is too much all at once for yours

truly. Give me a chance to get my nerve. You know I didn't want

to come, an' I guess your fam'ly ain't hankerin' to see me

neither."

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