Education

This brief, interpretive history of American schooling focuses on the evolving relationship between education and social change. Like its predecessors, this new edition adopts a thematic approach, investigating the impact of social forces such as industrialization, urbanization, immigration, globalization, and cultural conflict on the development of schools and other educational institutions. It also examines the various ways that schools have contributed to social change, particularly in enhancing the status and accomplishments of certain social groups and not others. Detailed accounts of the experiences of women and minority groups in American history consider how their lives have been affected by education, while "Focal Point" sections within each chapter allow the reader to hone in on key moments in history and their relevance within the broader scope of American schooling from the colonial era to the present.

This new edition has been comprehensively updated and edited for greater readability and clarity. It offers a revised final chapter, updated to include recent change in education politics and policy, in particular the decline of No Child Left Behind and the impact of the Common Core and movements against it. Further additions include enhanced coverage of colonial and early post-colonial American schooling, added materials on persistent issues such as race in education, an updated discussion of the GED program, and a closer look at the role of technology in schools. With its nuanced treatment of both historical and contemporary factors influencing the modern school system, this book remains an excellent resource for investigating and critiquing the social, economic, and cultural development of American education.

Guteks classic volume on the history of American education has been thoroughly revised and updated to provide a twenty-first-century perspective on the development of American educational institutions. Like earlier editions, the well-researched Third Edition employs a topical approach to examine the evolution of key institutions like the common school and the high school, as well as significant movements like progressive education, racial desegregation, and multiculturalism. Primary source readings enhance and reinforce chapter content and feature new writings from Benjamin Rush, Horace Mann, Maria Montessori, W. E. B. Du Bois, John Dewey, and Jane Addams.

Two new chapters add depth to this comprehensive, richly illustrated work. Immigration, Multiculturalism, and Education examines the response of public schools to the education of immigrant children in the context of Americas industrialization and urbanization. This compelling addition also looks at the changing demographics of immigration and discusses the experiences and contributions of Hispanic Americans and Asian Americans. Progressive Education and John Dewey explores the origins of progressive education, the philosophies of John Dewey and other leading progressive educators, and this movements ongoing influence in American classrooms.

The Third Editions topical organization lends itself to multiple uses in the classroom. Each chapter provides the historical foundation for the study of a contemporary topic in education, including the organization and structure of schools, the philosophy of education, early childhood education, curriculum and instruction, multicultural and bilingual education, and educational policy. 
Featuring current information and challenging perspectives on the latest issues and forces shaping the American educational system—with scholarship that is often cited as a primary source, Joel Spring introduces readers to the historical, political, social, and legal foundations of education and to the profession of teaching in the United States. In his signature straightforward, concise approach to describing complex issues, he illuminates events and topics that are often overlooked or whitewashed, giving students the opportunity to engage in critical thinking about education. Students come away informed on the latest topics, issues, and data and with a strong knowledge of the forces shaping the American educational system.

Thoroughly updated throughout, the 18th edition of this clear, authoritative text remains fresh and up to date, reflecting the many changes in education that have occurred since the publication of the previous edition. Topics and issues addressed and analyzed include

• The decline of the Common Core State Standards, particularly as result of a Republican-controlled administration currently in place

• Increasing emphasis on for-profit education, vouchers, charter schools and free-market competition between schools, expected to surge with the appointment of the new U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos

• Current debates about immigration and "Dreamers"—new statistics on immigrant education, discussion of education proposals to accommodate the languages, cultures and religions of newly arrived immigrants

• New education statistics on school enrollments, dropouts, education and income, school segregation, charter schools and home languages

• The purposes of education as presented in the 2016 platforms of the Republican, Democratic, Green, and Libertarian parties

• Discussions around transgender students

This volume considers the ways in which educational research is being shaped by policy across the globe. Policy effects on research are increasingly influential, as policies in and beyond education drive the formation of a knowledge-based economy by supporting increased international competitiveness through more effective, evidence-based interventions in schooling, education and training systems.

What consequences does this increased steering have for research in education? How do transnational agencies make their influence felt on educational research? How do national systems and traditions of educational research - and relations with policy - respond to these new pressures? What effects does it have on the quality of research and on the freedom of researchers to pursue their own agendas?

The 2006 volume of the World Yearbook of Education explores these issues, focusing on three key themes:

globalising policy and research in education steering education research in national contexts global-local politics of education research.

The 2006 volume has a truly global reach, incorporating transnational policy perspectives from the OECD and the European Commission, alongside national cases from across the world in contrasting contexts that include North and South America, Canada, France, Singapore, China, Russia and New Zealand. The range of contributions reflect how pervasive these developments are, how much is new in this situation and to what extent evidence-based policy pressures on research in education build on past relationships between education and policy.

This book considers the impact of the steering processes on the work and identities of individual researchers and considers how research can be organised to play a more active role in the politics of the knowledge economy and learning society.

This volume of Perspectives opens with two contrasting perspectives on the purpose of higher education at the dawning of the university age--perspectives that continue to define the debate today. First A. J. Angulo recreates the controversy surrounding the founding and early years of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Whether presented as an alternative to or a repudiation of the prevailing classical liberal education, MIT was rejected as inherently inferior by college defenders. Second is George Levesque's penetrating reappraisal of Yale president Noah Porter (1870-1886). Known almost solely for his role as a college defender, Porter is revealed as a vigorous scholar who became fixated with preserving the strengths of Yale College. As these matters were vigorously debated during these years, Porter's position was superseded by more powerful forces. Considering the cliches about liberal domination of higher education, it is seldom appreciated that the conservative movement has had a presence on campus throughout the postwar era. Jennifer de Forrest uses the reorganization of several conservative foundations to offer a critical appraisal of their impact. Known as the "four sisters," the Bradley Foundation, the Scaife Foundations, the Smith Richardson Foundation, and the Olin Foundation have been sharply focused on winning student support by funding conservative scholars and networking organizations, as well as student groups and newspapers. The tempestuous state of academic publishing is made more vivid by the clash of colorful characters. At the dawn of modern academic publishing, the Educational Review, published by Columbia's Nicholas Murray Butler, was the foremost journal in its field. Paul McInerny interweaves the history of this journal with the educational issues of the late nineteenth century and the remarkable career of Columbia's longtime president. An additional actor is James McKeen Cattell, a noted psychologist and prolific academic publisher. As a Columbia professor, Cattell was also a thorn in the side of President Butler. In 1917 Butler fired Cattell for criticizing the war effort, an egregious breach of academic freedom even for those early times. Events took an ironic turn, however, when Cattell later acquired Butler's former Review.
Praise for the Previous Edition of The American Community College

"Projecting the future for the community colleges of the early twenty-first century involves projecting the future for the nation in general: its demographics, economy, and public attitudes.... At heart is a discourse on how the institutions may adapt historical structures and practices to a changing world, and how those changes may ultimately affect students, the community, and society at large."

—from the Conclusion, "Toward the Future"

"Since 1982, The American Community College by Cohen and Brawer has been the authoritative book on community colleges. Anyone who wants to understand these complex and dynamic institutions—how they are evolving, the contributions they make, the challenges they face, the students they serve, and the faculty and leaders who deliver the services and the curricula—will find The American Community College both essential reading and an important reference book."

—George R. Boggs, former president and CEO, American Association of Community Colleges

"I have been a community college president for over forty-one years and a graduate professor for three decades. This book has been an inspiration to generations of students, faculty members, and administrators. It has become the classic of the field because it has great 'take-home' value to us all."

—Joseph N. Hankin, president, Westchester Community College

"Cohen and Brawer's classic work is the touchstone for a comprehensive overview of the American community college. This is a seminal book for graduate students as well as seasoned professionals for understanding this uniquely American institution."

—Charles R. Dassance, former president, Central Florida Community College

Globalisation and Historiography of National Leaders: Symbolic Representations in School Textbooks, the 18th book in the 24-volume book series Globalisation, Comparative Education and Policy Research, explores the interrelationship between ideology, national identity, national history and historical heroes, setting it in a global context. Based on this focus, the chapters represent hand-picked scholarly research on major discourses in the field of history textbooks and symbolic representations of national heroes, and draw upon recent studies in the areas of globalisation, history textbooks, and national leaders.A number of researchers have written on the importance of teaching national history in order to foster national identity and a sense of belonging to a certain society, state, and people among the younger generation. Some nations prefer to create national heroes out of their political leaders who are still in power, and whose lives and reputation are portrayed as being eminently spotless. Using diverse comparative education paradigms from critical theory, social semiotics, and historical-comparative research, the authors analyse the unpacking of the ideological agenda hidden behind the choice and lionization (or silencing) of the preferred national heroes. They provide an informed critique of various historical narratives depicting national leaders and national heroes.The book provides an easily accessible, practical yet scholarly source of information on international concerns in the field of globalisation, history education and policy research. Offering an essential sourcebook of ideas for researchers, history educators, practitioners and policymakers in the fields of globalisation and history education, it also provides a timely overview of current changes in politically correct history education narratives in history textbooks.
First published in 1999, American Higher Education in the Twenty-First Century offered a comprehensive introduction to the central issues facing American colleges and universities. This thoroughly revised edition brings the classic volume up to date. The contributors have rewritten every chapter to address major changes in higher education, including the rise of organized social movements, the problem of income inequality and stratification, and the growth of for-profit and distance education. Three new chapters cover information technology, community colleges, and teaching and learning.

This edition seeks to capture several crucial dynamics in the nexus of higher education and society. Placing higher education within its social and political contexts, the contributors discuss finance, federal and state governance, faculty, students, curriculum, and academic leadership. They also grapple with growing concerns about the future of the academy and reflect more deeply on the racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic diversity within higher education.

No other book covers such wide-ranging issues under the broader theme of higher education’s relationship to society. Highly acclaimed and incorporating cutting-edge research, American Higher Education in the Twenty-First Century is now more useful and engaging than ever.

Contributors: Michael N. Bastedo, Philip G. Altbach, Patricia J. Gumport, Benjamin Baez, Peter Riley Bahr, Joy Blanchard, Corbin M. Campbell, Melanie E. Corrigan, Peter D. Eckel, Roger L. Geiger, Lawrence E. Gladieux, Sara Goldrick-Rab, Jillian Leigh Gross, D. Bruce Johnstone, Adrianna Kezar, Jacqueline E. King, Aims C. McGuinness, Jr., Michael Mumper, Anna Neumann, Robert M. O’Neil, Laura W. Perna, Gary Rhoades, Roman Ruiz, Lauren Schudde, Sheila Slaughter, Daryl G. Smith

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